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Why does everything need to be in 3D??

posted by ymoran00 on - last edited - Viewed by 707 users

I loved the old Monkey Island games, and I was annoyed when the fourth went out as 3D. When I play these new episodes - it's annoying even more.
You may say I'm old fashioned, but it's not only that - today TV has 2D and 3D animations together co-existing - each one of the techniques has its place. In 2D, the game looked smooth and was funny, comics like. But in 3D it looks awful - the non-smooth circles, the jittery movements, the fire on the boat in the start of the game that looked totally unrelated to the boat - it just doesn't look right.
What do you think?

84 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • The non smooth circles? What?

    Also, if your movement is jittery, turn down the graphics details until they are smooth.


    Generally 3D is preferred over 2D because it's faster and easier to develop for, and is cheaper.

  • He means that you can see polygon edges on stuff that's supposed to be round.

    Both have their place and hopefully once the whole chaos around adventure games as settled, we'll get both kinds as well. The adventure-revival movement is still in its infancy :)

  • Why does everything need to be in 3D??

    'cos you will probably see a line if you are looking a character from his/her side.

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    jmm

    @jp-30 said: The non smooth circles? What?

    Also, if your movement is jittery, turn down the graphics details until they are smooth.


    Generally 3D is preferred over 2D because it's faster and easier to develop for, and is cheaper.

    Plus, you can reuse models and scales better (if the engine is good enough) to different resolutions

  • There should be an official statement about this, because it has been said a lot of times.

    2D is too expensive for such a small-time company, because, surprise, Telltale doesn't have the resources for that, especially not with the episodic formula.

  • @smashing said: Why does everything need to be in 3D??

    'cos you will probably see a line if you are looking a character from his/her side.

    If you can see it from the side it isn't 2D.

  • Um, how is 2D too expensive? It's *simpler* than 3D -- one fewer dimensions to worry about.

  • @CuriosTiger said: Um, how is 2D too expensive? It's *simpler* than 3D -- one fewer dimensions to worry about.

    For 3D games, once the models and environment is in place, the script will just manipulate these elements and camera angles for the game. The reusability of models can be very high in a game, especially apparent in ToMI, where two character model template are pretty much used through the games for a number of characters.

    For 2D game, every single scene is an image. In order to do close-up for instance, you have to draw another scene. In order to change a perspective, you have to make another scene as well.

    It used to be that 2D games are cheaper to produce. But nowadays, with off-the shelf 3D illustrators, anyone can generate 3D atmosphere easily.

    Anyway, any good machinima on ToMI yet?

  • Not really, with 2D drawings you have to simulate perspective as well. It's just that it isn't generated automatically but instead has to be imagined and created by a human. A human who wants to get paid and who can only do so many drawings in a given timespan.

    In 3D you create the model, the bones and if you want to animate it, you just push the bones around. (It's not quite as simple, but that should give you a general idea of the differences)

    Edit: Sorry, didn't refresh before posting.

  • Some guy called Ron Gilbert answers why 2D is no longer the adventure-game style of choice these days:

    http://grumpygamer.com/4904226

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