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Spelling Errours

posted by Iron Curtain on - last edited - Viewed by 875 users

I haven't completed the Bogey Man yet, but I can tell the orthography is mostly Webster's American and not The Queen's British. This is a problem.

Here are some examples:[list]
[*]A street sign saying "Town Center" instead of "Town Centre"
[*]Miss Prudence Flitt saying "Organizations" instead of "Organisations"
[*]Miss Prudence Flitt saying "Squalor" instead of "Squalour"[/list]
I'm just saying, to immerse myself in the "Britishness" of the Wallace & Gromit license, I think the English orthography should be British rather than American (even though my personal preference is American).

46 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Iron Curtain said: Spelling Errours


    This is just so ironic.

  • @SS the Free! said: This is just so ironic.

    That was the point. I was making a joke with by spelling "error" as "errour." I was mocking the way the British spell things (colo(u)r, flavo(u)r, etc.).

  • I think they try to but being an American company, I'm not surprised they've not picked up on the slightly different spellings of certain words.

    I can't say I even noticed until reading this thread.

  • @corruptbiggins said: I think they try to but being an American company, I'm not surprised they've not picked up on the slightly different spellings of certain words.

    I can't say I even noticed until reading this thread.

    I'm more concerned with them spelling words correctly for ANY English dialect, since they always seem to have like 50 spelling errors in the subtitles.

  • Yeah, that Town Center thing was narking me off a bit, glad someone else picked up on it.

    Also, not really a spelling error as such, but the chemists had a sign saying "DRUGS" in the window. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I've never seen any chemists selling "drugs", as the word has a bit of a nasty connotation here.
    It's usually medication or prescriptives.

  • If were talking technicalities here though, most medication are drugs, as they're absorbed into the body and change bodily functions, which is the definition of a drug... However Harmful drugs have been shortened down to just drugs, so it's no surprising that people don't realise medication can be drugs too. I do agree it does give a bit of a nasty connotation, but that adds to the humour of it. :P

    Personally, although I'm British, and I spell using the british spellings, I've gotten so used to seeing American spellings in games that I've become immune to it, so I don't really notice it. Usually only scan read subtitles anyway too, so I don't pick up the spellings. I can see why some people might get annoyed with it though, considering it's set in Britain.

  • But the point is, a British pharmacy wouldn't display a sign saying 'drugs' (Superdrug notwithstanding).

  • @giant_frying_pan said: But the point is, a British pharmacy wouldn't display a sign saying 'drugs' (Superdrug notwithstanding).


    good point..never seen a pharmacy say "drugs" on the window.

  • @Badwolf said: Also, not really a spelling error as such, but the chemists had a sign saying "DRUGS" in the window. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I've never seen any chemists selling "drugs", as the word has a bit of a nasty connotation here.
    It's usually medication or prescriptives.


    Not really. Superdrug are the second largest chain of chemists in the UK.

    That said we are more coy about drugs than in the States. The "ask your doctor for..." adverts would be illegal over here, but virtually everyone knows medications are normally drugs.

    Personally, I think the games do feel quite British and these are relatively small niggles.

  • Yeah but you're missing the point, it's a game, it's meant to be humerous, and personally I think that adds to the humerous nature. If it was a serious game, perhaps.

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