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Bulletin: Telltale is not LucasArts

posted by Sean A on - last edited - Viewed by 1.3K users

Just for those of you on these boards who don't seem to get it, Telltale wants to do things differently from LucasArts, hence the absence of insanely abstract puzzles and longer games that only come out once every few years.

Also, when they announce a project, it actually comes out.

So for those of you who are bashing the difficulty of Culture Shock, or are griping about its length, or are saying it's not as good as Hit the Road, stop letting your nostalgia get in the way of your opinion. Culture Shock is every bit a Sam and Max game as Hit the Road, but it will never live up to the latter's legacy because it's not trying to. It's a different kind of game, and will never be just like an old LucasArts game. Ever.

Telltale still has a few kinks to iron out of its games, true, but they're doing that, going so far as to update their old games (Bone, for example) to accomodate some of our suggestions and comments.

What other company on earth does that? LucasFarts? How much gameplay do you want for $7-$9 an episode? If you take your time, enjoying all of the dialogue, easter eggs and other shenanigans Telltale incorporated into Culture Shock, you're getting more than your money's worth. Way more.

As far as I'm concerned it's a monumental achievment that this game even exists, not even accounting for how freaking good it is.

So shut up. (This goes for me, too; I've said things elsewhere on these boards that may make it seem like I don't believe any of this, but the more I think about it the more I love some of the changes Telltale made, and I'm tired of comparing it to something it's not trying to be.)

Okay, I'm done.

Telltale, you rock my world, babies.

35 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Can't we just merge these threads with the other ones on difficulty? *sigh

    What does everyone think of the challenge level of monkey 2?
    I think it is about right for an adventure game.... though I was much younger then so maybe it wasn't as challenging as I thought.

  • @Alucard said: Can't we just merge these threads with the other ones on difficulty? *sigh

    What does everyone think of the challenge level of monkey 2?
    I think it is about right for an adventure game.... though I was much younger then so maybe it wasn't as challenging as I thought.

    I'm done with these threads for now anyway. TellTale has plenty of material to work with, and I think we've all given them some great Ideas. It's up to them now to decide whether to do anything with it.

  • I'm just glad people have stopped complaining about the voices. :D

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    Sean A Telltale Staff

    @Jokieman said: That's an easy out isn't it? Considering The Lucas Arts games remain the best of the Genre, until another company can capture that feel again, they will pale in comparison.

    So you're saying Culture Shock pales? In comparison?

    Interesting, considering this whole thread is a plea to stop comparing them and follow Telltale wherever it is they're taking us.

  • @Emily said: I'm just glad people have stopped complaining about the voices. :D

    And another thing, the voices in TT's games aren't nearly as good as LucasArts!

    Jokes! Jokes! (I'm one of the few who has had little to no problem with the voices in any of the games so far :) )

  • shoemonkey if you dont like the threads..dont read em! telltale have shown they respond to customer feedback(look at improvement from bone 1 to bone 2) so people are going to express how they feel about the game. I agree with incognito too, everytime someone says they want more of a challenge, someone else says we dont want ridiculous puzzles no 1 can solve.. No one's even asking for that!

  • If you don't want to solve puzzles, why play an adventure game? Gametap has lots of Sam & Max cartoons you can watch...

  • I play adventuregames for the story, characters and (in cases like this) the humour.

    Puzzles are wonderful, granted, but they're not the reason I play these games.

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    Sean A Telltale Staff

    @jp-30 said: I play adventuregames for the story, characters and (in cases like this) the humour.

    Puzzles are wonderful, granted, but they're not the reason I play these games.

    I'm totally in agreement here.

    Once again: The point of this thread is not to say there should not be difficult puzzles (especially not ones that no one can solve, ye who won't spell "one"), it is to say that these episodic Sam & Max games should not necessarily be looked at as "Adventure Games". Telltale has stated many times it's not going for the tried-and-true system, it's trying to mix things up a bit.

    That's all I'm saying. The only reason we even got into a difficulty discussion on this thread is because I used difficulty as an example of what might remain different in a Telltale game, okay?

    I honestly could give a crap if I had to solve another illogical puzzle if it means I get to laugh. Really. All that's important to me is more Sam & Max. Period.

  • Wow. I just wrote a tremendously long post with my opinions on the matter and it got lost somewhere in the Internet. Maybe I should take that as a sign. Oh well.

    Here goes. I think the whole controversy about the difficulty of Culture Shock comes down to what we expect from it. To some of us it was a shock, if you will. Here's my story.

    I learned about Culture Shock today. I downloaded it today. I finished it... today. Never before have I done that with any game. Yes, I know, It's episodic. So it HL2 episode 1 and it is episodic, but I digress. I have no problem with the length of the game.

    I am a nostalgic gamer. Lucasarts adventure games were some of the first games that I played and I loved them. Still do. The Monkey Island franchise, S&M HtR, DoTT, Indiana Jones, Grim Fandango. All spectacular games. I enjoyed having to figure out that I need gunpowder and flint to blow up a damn to float a log to make a dead guy fall out of a tree. The puzzle is the fun part for me. I realize that we don't all feel the same way.

    Here are 2 common examples of puzzles from Culture Shock and my take on them. First, the psycho-therapist. I had a form that told me I needed certain dependencies, I had various options to choose from. I had to figure out what would make me seem violent toward dentists. Brilliant stuff. Not hard at all, but not a given. It was a puzzle.

    On the other hand, I was given a diagram with a big hanger on it so I knew immediately that I would need the hanger from the TV. Not necessarily a bad thing. What disappointed me was that instead of building the helmet, I had to give the diagram to someone I already knew could build it and was told I needed an antenna, which is exactly what the hanger was already being used for.
    That isn't a puzzle to me. That's being told what to do. In my head that was drawing a line from A to B, which is much less gratifying than figuring out where A and B are located. To me, that made it like, to steal someones line, an interactive movie. I'd rather just watch a Sam & Max cartoon than go through the monotony of clicking on things they tell me to click on. To me, the fun is in figuring it out.

    Others have said they don't like the monotony of finding a cup, a golf ball retriever and twin to get a bit a tar. I don't find that monotonous, I find drawing that line to be the monotonous thing.

    @jp-30 said: I play adventuregames for the story, characters and (in cases like this) the humour.

    Puzzles are wonderful, granted, but they're not the reason I play these games.


    I'm the opposite. I like this type of game for the puzzles. The story, characters and humor, while also very important, come after that. And this is why we get the current controversy on the forums. Some like the puzzles, some like the story.

    Now I'm not bashing the game, I enjoyed it, but it wasn't an adventure game like I expected. It was a different, fun, type of game. I just hope Telltale continues to take these games somewhere that makes them more popular. Granted I'd be much happier with more puzzles. But if that happened others would be less interested. Ideally there would be a happy medium somewhere that pleases everyone. Let's hope they find that (not that I wasn't pleased.) Going back to monkey island, which is and probably always will be my favorite game franchise, I like the 2 difficulty method. "The easy version" vs "The hard version" Not only does it give you the option to play the game a second time without doing the same things, but it makes the hard version easier if you play the easy one first. Or don't. The option is yours. But some people don't like playing easy vs hard. Okay, let's change the names and see if it works any better: "The storyline version" and "The puzzle version" Some sort of implementation of this is what I would like. The best of both worlds.

    And who knows, maybe the future episodes of Sam and Max will be "harder". Maybe not. Either way I'm looking forward to them.

    To sum up:

    I'm a nostalgic adventure gamer that found Sam and Max and was thrilled. However I was a little disappointed when it turned out a little different from a classic adventure game. But we all have our different opinions and the puzzles and that is what kindled these discussions.
    I like complex puzzles. I mean for crying out loud, I like the torturous puzzles at http://weffriddles.com/ I find that fun. A lot of the people that would want to play a game like this would think that's a waste of time. My opinion is, if it's possible, which I do believe it is, build both ways into the game. 2 versions with different emphasises. Storyline and Puzzles.

    Now I hope I made sense with what I wanted to say. I'm running on no sleep and incredibly tired, but wanted to contribute while I had just finished the game.

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