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Was it difficult to get the rights?

posted by Ashton on - last edited - Viewed by 134 users

I was just curious, as most of you original members of the Telltale Team were former, disgruntled, employees of Lucus Arts, if you had a lot of trouble getting the lisence to make ToMI (or if the reverse happened - they knew you personally and were more willing to give you the rights as opposed to other game studios)

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  • I think LucasArts was willing to give the rights because they kinda felt bad about focusing on Star Wars and leaving the franchise of Monkey Island behind. Then they thought like "screw it, give it to another company so we can squeeze up SW for more profit without any remorse".

  • I do not get the feeling that they were all disgruntled, just that the direction they wanted to go with LA's games where not entirely in tune with what their talent wanted to do so it was time for some of them to go on and try new things...

    Its like friends you see years after graduation... you have all grown up, and your interests may have changed but there is still some mutual respect and you decide to do something together that you used to love back in the day.

  • Might have something to do with Darrell Rodriguez becoming president of LucasArts in April 2008; IIRC it was said then that one thing he wanted to do was breath some fresh air in LucasArts adventure franchises...

  • @Leak said: Might have something to do with Darrell Rodriguez becoming president of LucasArts in April 2008; IIRC it was said then that one thing he wanted to do was breath some fresh air in LucasArts adventure franchises...

    I hadnt heard that (I kinda fell out of the gaming news world after my subscriptions to EGM and NP ran out in like 2002) I thought it was odd that so many adventure games were popping up now with the familiar LA logo (and re-releases/Remakes of older games) oh it would be nice if they dug out the old code for S+M:FP and completed it :D lol

    It's highly amusing also that they went to TTG for ToMI since TTG is most of the old LA Adventure game department... I have to wonder if anyone from TTG went back to LA...

  • I think you'll find TTG approached LA with the intention of reviving the MI licence.

  • @Leak said: Might have something to do with Darrell Rodriguez becoming president of LucasArts in April 2008; IIRC it was said then that one thing he wanted to do was breath some fresh air in LucasArts adventure franchises...


    This. It wouldn't surprise me if they had approached LA before he became president, and had been declined.

  • Check this thread out and in particular the below excerpt from 2006;


    [quote]
    (Source);

    GI: A lot of those LucasArts franchises are still very popular - you spoke about Day of the Tentacle. Is there a chance you'll be able to wrangle a few more of those away for more episodes? Are you working on that at all?

    Connors: It's definitely on our minds and it's definitely something we think about. Maybe I can give you more information a while from now. It's definitely something that makes good sense to everybody. For them it's the same thing. For them it's "What's the business model? What's the retail model?" It's not their type of game - it's not Star Wars, it's not with the movie, with the lightsaber - an action game. When trying to do the two things at the same time it makes it challenging. They've been trying to figure out the right solution, and hopefully Telltale is part of it.[/quote]

  • "Looks like something went horribly wrong somewhere in the Internet. As a result, the page you've requested isn't available. Or maybe it doesn't exist. Maybe it never existed. Maybe this page is a figment of your imagination. Maybe you're a figment of your own imagination. Did we just blow your mind?"

  • I had heard LA approached them, actually, although I can't find where I read that, so take what I say with a grain of salt. Also, I think most of the Telltale employees left LA awhile ago or were fired in the purges of the early 2000's. I mean, Ron Gilbert left way back, and Dave Grossman and Chuck Jordan were both freelancers for awhile before they joined Telltale, Grossman even more so than Jordan. Plus there's a lot of new blood at Telltale as well.

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