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Jack Black Likes Grickle? o_O

posted by The Highway on - last edited - Viewed by 843 users

@Space Wolf T-Shirt Page said: This iconic design originated from a short video by Grickle illustrator Graham Annable. The video's good, the shirt's even better! Even Jack Black thinks so!

spacewolf_jackblack.jpgDoes Jack Black like Grickle? That's pretty cool, you'd think Telltale would feature that more prominently on the site!

Never mind, just realised that was shopped. I think.

Actually, now I don't think it was shopped.

50 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Laserschwert said: THAT'S FORBIDDEN!!!


    The image was manipulated using Adobe® Photoshop® software!

  • @Laserschwert said: THAT'S FORBIDDEN!!!

    I wonder why they care. Surely it just shows how well known they have become.

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @Laserschwert said: THAT'S FORBIDDEN!!!

    Haha, that's ridiculous. Trying to control language? You'd have better luck trying to control an avalanche of cats.

    Anyway, I don't see Hoover, Xerox, or Google complaining. :rolleyes:

  • @puzzlebox said: Haha, that's ridiculous. Trying to control language? You'd have better luck trying to control an avalanche of cats.

    Anyway, I don't see Hoover, Xerox, or Google complaining. :rolleyes:


    See, I didn't even know 'to hoover' came from a company name.
    Maybe Adobe is on to something then, if people that use the verb start to forget the origins...

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    Tor

    @puzzlebox said: Anyway, I don't see Hoover, Xerox, or Google complaining. :rolleyes:


    Google and Xerox have both tried it... not that it helps much, of course.

  • @Jake said: It's real!

    Wow, I wonder how many celebraties order from your game warehouse? I wonder if any are on the forums... Watching us :eek:.

  • If companies don't make attempts to protect and enforce their trademarks, then the marks fall into the public domain and are no longer the property of their owners/creators. Most companies get around this problem by creating a generic noun or phrase to describe their products, like Rollerblade inline skates, Kleenex facial tissue, and Xerox copiers.

    So Adobe has to make such warnings in order to legally protect the Photoshop trademark.

  • It's true. Adobe has to care, because if they did not show an "attempt to protect their trademark", the government could allow any image editing software to use the term "Photoshop". It of course seems horribly asinine for regular everyday life, but Kleenex used to be a trademark and now it's not.

  • @Rather Dashing said: It's true. Adobe has to care, because if they did not show an "attempt to protect their trademark", the government could allow any image editing software to use the term "Photoshop". It of course seems horribly asinine for regular everyday life, but Kleenex used to be a trademark and now it's not.


    The Kleenex mark is still valid, according to the US Patent & Trademark Office.

    A canonical example of a genericized trademark is escalator; most people don't know it was a trademark at one time.

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    You're a lawyery-type person, aren't you Wap? Thanks for the explanation! It makes a lot more sense if the aim is legal protection of the trademark rather than trying to stop generic use of that trademark in everyday speech in any realistic way.

    I was under the impression that Microsoft actually wants "Bing" to become a verb. I heard it used on some TV show (as in, "Why don't you Bing it?"), and assumed it had to be product placement because it was so jarring. No one says "Bing it". I think they showed the webpage too. Would a company court common usage like that for the exposure, then whack up some legal stuff to the contrary to ensure the trademark remains protected?

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