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Most Hated Grammatical/Spelling Errors

posted by Hayden on - last edited - Viewed by 2.1K users

Here's a thread for the grammar Nazis to vent. Do you see any spelling or grammatical errors that really get up your nose? Here are some of my pet hates:

'Your dumb'
'Definately'
'I should of'

I have many more, but I'll leave them for the rest of you guys.

281 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • - Bought and Brought
    - Your and You're
    - There, Their, and of course, They're

    These are currently the only three I can think of at the moment, but I know there are more.

    Also, does pronouncing things count. I've said it before and I will say it again. The word is pronounced straw-berry. Note the 'E'. It's there for a reason. Why can no one pronounce it where I live?

  • @jeeno0142 said: Also, does pronouncing things count. I've said it before and I will say it again. The word is pronounced straw-berry. Note the 'E'. It's there for a reason. Why can no one pronounce it where I live?

    Yeah, pronunciations count. I always hate it when people pronounce 'H' as 'haych' instead of 'aych'. But I'm pretty sure both are acceptable.

    Extra Note: Also, another of my most hated grammatical errors is when people write 'to' when it should be 'too'. Is it really so hard to write/type an extra 'o'?

  • @Hayden said: Yeah, pronunciations count.

    Good. Then I can go ahead and mention another pronunciation that I know I've mentioned before. Library. Spelt with an 'r' between the 'b' and 'a'. Yet nobody seems to pronounce it. WHY???!!!

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    DPB

    "I could care less." You could? Thanks for letting me know!

    I'm also amazed how often rogue gets mispelled as 'rouge' - what's so difficult about this word that half the internet can't spell it correctly?

  • Oh, finally! A thread for Grammar Nazis is here.

    One of the hardest things in my life is going on Facebook and seeing my cousin's posts.

    For example, check this out: going tp hearshy park taday. :)

    If I could only tell her what I thought of that....

    Let's see... zero capitalization, you spelled "to" wrong, (is that possible?) you spelled Hershey Park wrong, and I have no idea how you spelled today wrong. That's nothing to smile about, Sarah.

    (Don't forget, she's 13.)

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    Tor

    @Weeblerjake said: That's nothing to smile about, Sarah.


    Most important of all, a smiley constitutes incorrect use of punctuation.

  • My favourite and most hated at the same time is when people mispell genius

    "I'm a genious" *snigger*

  • I agree completely with everything everyone's said so far. I have to restrain myself from correcting people when I see this stuff. I do realise, though, that they're perfectly innocent mistakes and that by correcting them I'd be being a massive dick :p

    For those of you who are unsure about some of these things, here's some help with the things that have been brought up so far (and one or two more things):

    Brought/Bought - "bRought" pertains to the word "bRing" whereas "bought" pertains to the word "buy". So if you go to the shop and buy something, you have "bought" that item because there is no R in "buy", but if you bring something to work/school with you, you have "brought" that item because there IS and R in "bring".

    There/Their/They're - "Their" is a possessive pronoun. This means that it always refers to a PERSON and to their POSSESSIONS (not necessarily physical possessions, maybe just qualities which they possess). For example. "that's their picture", or "their face looks funny".

    "There" is an adverb. It can be remembered in some cases because it is similar to the word "here", but just with a T at the beginning. For example, "that's neither Here nor tHere" or "I'm going over tHere/Come over Here".
    It can also be used as a pronoun in cases such as "there's a snake in my boot" or "there is a problem with my lower intestines".

    "They're" is a shortened version of "they are". The apostrophe signifies that letters have been missed out (the letter A, in this case). If you can change the sentence to include "they are", then use "they're". For example, you can't say "they are is a snake in my boot", but you CAN say, "they are not listening to me".

    Definitely/Definately - You can remember that "definitely" is the correct spelling because it's just the word "finite" (as in "infinite") with "de" in front of it and "ly" at the end.

    Were/Was - Sometimes it's difficult to know whether to say, for example, "if I was you" or "if I were you". The trick is to remember that "were" is used in instances where the thing you're referring to hasn't happened. Usually, if you're using the word "if", then you're looking for "were" and not "was". The word "was" is used when something has already happened. For example, "that was awesome" rather than "that were awesome".

    Your/You're - As with above, the apostrophe in "You're" signals that there is a missing letter. Again, the letter is A. If you can replace the word with "you are", you should use "you're". The word "your" is a pronoun. It is usually used to referred to somebody's possessions, for example, "is this your knife? It appears to have thrust itself into my lower intestine".

    Should of/should have - With phrases like "shoulda", coulda" and "woulda", the word "have" is used rather than "of". This example will show you the logic behind that: "I have been to the doctor", "I should have gone to the doctor" Vs. "I of been to the doctor", "I should of gone to the doctor". The second two examples don't make sense.

  • Most of the worst offenders have already been mentioned, but one thing that always annoys me is misuse of "less" and "fewer".

    Like when people say that there are less people. It hurt just to type that example.

  • @Alcoremortis said: Like when people say that there are less people. It hurt just to type that example.

    If there was fewer disregard for the proper use of grammar there'd be less mistakes like that.


    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLO

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