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Well, just played 1 and 2 and I was right-review

posted by shadow9d9 on - last edited - Viewed by 2.7K users

The idea of episodic adventure gaming always sounded troublesome to me. For FPSs, it made sense. For adventures, I assumed that since each episode would be short, the fun part of adventure gaming would be missing. Puzzling. The combination of fewer locations and fewer items would lead to a lack of puzzle amount and challenge. I decided to wait until all episodes were released.

In checking out Myst Online, I found that for 99 cents I could join gametap for a month. After signing up I figured I might as well play the sam and max sooner rather than later since it is included.

Good points: Fantastic graphics, fairly amusing dialogue, good voice acting.

Bad points: Long and frequent load times, very few items(6 in the first episode) leads to easy puzzles, forced to watch intro movie and ending credits with no way of bypassing, few locations, super short and predictable stories.

Unfortunately, my fears were justified. Despite fantastic graphics and decent, if over the top stabs at humor, the game felt completely watered down. The fun of adventure gaming comes from slowly accumulating new items, talking to people, and trying to figure out what the next logical step is amongst all the items/puzzles/characters/locations. As such I felt little motivation to play-"well, I might as well finish since I get it free with gametap."

The idea that the full season will "equal" 15 hours total or whatever is really misleading. It is more like 6 x 2-3 hours of gaming. The difference is that you'll never have a ton of items and a ton of places where they could possibly be used, which would require you to slowly explore your options and think.

I'd rather have nothing than these kind of episodes to be honest. It is great financially for telltale, but not good for the gamer.

Sorry if I sound harsh, but the episodes were even more simplistic than I imagined, even after preparing myself with the reviews. I don't even think I'll end up playing episode 3, which I get for free.

Adventure gaming isn't dead, and with new games like Barrow Hill, Al Emmo, Runaway 2 still coming out, why settle for less?

109 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @shadow9d9 said: The idea that the full season will "equal" 15 hours total or whatever is really misleading. It is more like 6 x 2-3 hours of gaming. The difference is that you'll never have a ton of items and a ton of places where they could possibly be used, which would require you to slowly explore your options and think.



    Many, many beloved adventure games (Grim Fandango is the classic example) have distinct 'chapters', from where you cannot return to past locales, and the transitions are often accompanied by a significant loss of inventory.

    @shadow9d9 said: I'd rather have nothing than these kind of episodes to be honest.

    So, don't play them then.

    To each their own of course, but I don't agree with much of your assessment myself, nor at least 2 of your 3 recommended alternate adventure games to play.

  • @shadow9d9 said:
    The idea that the full season will "equal" 15 hours total or whatever is really misleading. It is more like 6 x 2-3 hours of gaming. The difference is that you'll never have a ton of items and a ton of places where they could possibly be used, which would require you to slowly explore your options and think.



    We're all entitled to our own gaming habits, but to me 12-18 hours of gaming total (6 x 2-3 hours) where most of that total time is spent seeing/hearing new content at a consistent pace is a lot better than a 15 hour game where most of that time is spent slowly wandering around and having content arrive at a slow pace. I've tried Myst Online, but while intriguing, I really didn't have the time or patience to spend hours and hours on the puzzles--just not the pace for me.

    ---

    And anyway, wouldn't Myst Online actually sort of qualify as episodic adventuring, since new content (locations, puzzles, and storyline) are supposed to arrive at a consistently scheduled pace? The difference with Sam and Max is that Sam and Max are following a more-or-less stand-alone episodic model (akin to a TV sitcom like Seinfeld or The Simpsons) while Myst is more of a serial episodic model (ala 24 and Lost).

    Forgive me if I'm misinterpreting Myst Online.

  • I fail to understand why you think episodic gaming with first person shooters make sense. I don't know about you, but FPS would be in my mind worse examples on episodic gaming. This is because:

    * Half Life 2 Episode 2 is delayed and it's release has been pushed into 2007
    * Release date for the second Sin has yet to be announced
    * Who actually plays the episodic games from Kuma?

    Lets not hope Half Life and Sin will have its episodes be on Forever development.

    On the other hand, Sam and Max Season 1 episodes are coming out on reliable releases. Not to mention the writing is excellent. So yeah, I think episodic gaming for adventure games make more sense than FPS. The latter type of game is more difficult to develop and keep a schedule.

  • @numble said: We're all entitled to our own gaming habits, but to me 12-18 hours of gaming total (6 x 2-3 hours) where most of that total time is spent seeing/hearing new content at a consistent pace is a lot better than a 15 hour game where most of that time is spent slowly wandering around and having content arrive at a slow pace. I've tried Myst Online, but while intriguing, I really didn't have the time or patience to spend hours and hours on the puzzles--just not the pace for me.

    ---

    And anyway, wouldn't Myst Online actually sort of qualify as episodic adventuring, since new content (locations, puzzles, and storyline) are supposed to arrive at a consistently scheduled pace? The difference with Sam and Max is that Sam and Max are following a more-or-less stand-alone episodic model (akin to a TV sitcom like Seinfeld or The Simpsons) while Myst is more of a serial episodic model (ala 24 and Lost).

    Forgive me if I'm misinterpreting Myst Online.



    I am trying myst online for 99 cents... it is beta... plus, each age is much much longer than one s and m episode, which is the point. You never get stuck in s and m.. you often get stuck in a myst age.
    I am trying it because I want a coop game with my wife... I only brought it up because its promotion of 99 cents for a month let me try sam and max for free.

    Did you read what I enjoy about adventure gaming? Enough areas/items/puzzles to present a challenge... myst's ages are long enough to accomplish that, unless you think myst games are easy....

  • @Mishakun said: I fail to understand why you think episodic gaming with first person shooters make sense. I don't know about you, but FPS would be in my mind worse examples on episodic gaming. This is because:

    * Half Life 2 Episode 2 is delayed and it's release has been pushed into 2007
    * Release date for the second Sin has yet to be announced
    * Who actually plays the episodic games from Kuma?

    Lets not hope Half Life and Sin will have its episodes be on Forever development.

    On the other hand, Sam and Max Season 1 episodes are coming out on reliable releases. Not to mention the writing is excellent. So yeah, I think episodic gaming for adventure games make more sense than FPS. The latter type of game is more difficult to develop and keep a schedule.



    Did you read why I complained about adventure game episodes? I explained it in detail and it had nothing to do with the release schedule. Perhaps you should go back and read it.

    I don't care if each s and m episode was released a day after another, they suffer from lack of locations/items/puzzles to make a compelling adventure game...no challenge/no exploration/little thought needed... therefore contrived.

  • Well, It's obvious that you won't be convinced. It's your opinion and you are welcome to it. We just have a different opinion from you. :)

  • @shadow9d9 said: Did you read why I complained about adventure game episodes? I explained it in detail and it had nothing to do with the release schedule. Perhaps you should go back and read it.



    No, I'm pretty sure I've read it several times.

    But I have to confess that I'm still confused to why you start off arguing FPS is better for episodic gaming than adventure games. I thought it was the same thing, i.e. taking a full game and make it in smaller chunks instead. Am I being stupid? :confused:

  • @Mishakun said: No, I'm pretty sure I've read it several times.

    But I have to confess that I'm still confused to why you start off arguing FPS is better for episodic gaming than adventure games. I thought it was the same thing, i.e. taking a full game and make it in smaller chunks instead. Am I being stupid? :confused:



    Well, I explained what makes adventure games unique... fps games are straight forward.. just need to add more landscape...can make it as hard or easy as you want,...

    Adventure games require items/puzzles... Sam and max episode 1 had a whole 6 items and about 6 total locations... It was easy, lacking thought needed.. therefore, what is the point in bothering? I play adventure games to think...

  • @fhqwhgads said: Well, It's obvious that you won't be convinced. It's your opinion and you are welcome to it. We just have a different opinion from you. :)



    Feel free to explain to me what you enjoy in adventure games if not for enjoying the challenge of figuring out what items goers where/puzzling... I explained what makes adventure games enjoyable and how this game is lacking in those categories... what am I missing?

    No one has commented on the long loading times, forced watching of credits in the beginning and end, etc of my cons btw.

  • I can comment on the long loading times with a question mark. What are these long loading times you are speaking of? :) Maybe my two year old computer is not so old as I thought it was.

    I play adventure games to think as well. The language in Sam and Max is actually difficult and rich in vocabulary (for non-native-english this would be a challenge in itself). But I don't want to play puzzles where you have to bring in this stuffed cat from two scenes ago and together with duct tape combine it with a phone booth in order to call all the hip cats just so you can get some swiss cheese. Ludicrous! That wierd kind of puzzles is what killed adventure games genre in the first place (according to Old Man Murray).

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