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Traditional animation vs. 3D animation...

posted by Leplaya on - last edited - Viewed by 4.8K users

I am not that big of King's quest, but I have seen bits of pieces of the games. The only game of King's quest that I remember playing was the 7th one, and that one was the Princeless Bride. I'm not that big into the animation of that one(Since I dislike it when people mimic the Disney style) but my sister likes it and it reminds her of Don Bluth's style. I know the game is likely to be done in 3D but will there be certain parts of the game that will use 2D? Or even better, used for the cutscenes of the game? It would be sweet if that would happen.

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  • @JuntMonkey said: Yea this is one of the arguments people make to defend mediocre graphics in adventure games, but I don't think it's accurate. The adventure game market is small because the games are mediocre with bad graphics, not the other way around.

    Sorry, but that just doesn't square with economic logic. If there was a sufficient market for big-budget adventure games with state-of-the-art graphics, the game industry would have moved to fill that demand by now. But it was not better graphics alone that led to shooters and other genres eclipsing the popularity of adventures among video gamers.

    Incidentally, how is it you see an explanation, which is what I offered whether accurate and not, as somehow a "defense of mediocre graphics"? (If someone explains the political and economic reasons for why the healthcare system sucks, do you conclude that they are defending poor healthcare?)

    I believe that adventure gamers in general are very much in favor of high-quality graphics, but some define that differently than you do (and each other for that matter). It's not really fair to equate those views as "defending mediocrity".

  • @thom-22 said: Sorry, but that just doesn't square with economic logic. If there was a sufficient market for big-budget adventure games with state-of-the-art graphics, the game industry would have moved to fill that demand by now. But it was not better graphics alone that led to shooters and other genres eclipsing the popularity of adventures among video gamers.

    Incidentally, how is it you see an explanation, which is what I offered whether accurate and not, as somehow a "defense of mediocre graphics"? (If someone explains the political and economic reasons for why the healthcare system sucks, do you conclude that they are defending poor healthcare?)

    I believe that adventure gamers in general are very much in favor of high-quality graphics, but some define that differently than you do (and each other for that matter). It's not really fair to equate those views as "defending mediocrity".

    Every played Heavy Rain? Solid straight adventure game with excellent graphics. Sold extremely well.

  • @wilco64256 said: Every played Heavy Rain? Solid straight adventure game with excellent graphics. Sold extremely well.

    I can say that I haven't because I don't think there's PC version. And I'm not certain if I would buy it even if there was PC version, because based on my experience PC versions of console games are bit clumsy and awkward. For example Resident Evil 2 wasn't a bad action-adventure, but it suffered from limited saves (which makes sense with consoles, but not on PC) and clumsy keyboard controls. Console adventures are their own genre and not the same as PC's adventure games.

  • If console adventures are their own genre than how do you explain Telltale's games? Almost all of them are available on consoles.

    Personally, I think the Heavy Rain style is what Telltale should be doing (Jurassic Park doesn't count, you can't even walk).

  • @MusicallyInspired said: If console adventures are their own genre than how do you explain Telltale's games? Almost all of them are available on consoles.

    Personally, I think the Heavy Rain style is what Telltale should be doing (Jurassic Park doesn't count, you can't even walk).

    Some PC games are ported also to the consoles and vice versa, it's nothing new, even some of the older adventures were available on consoles (IIRC even some King's Quest games were ported). However console adventure games seem to have their own tradition, which has very little to do with the PC's adventure games.

  • Telltale's games are conformed to console standards. They aren't just "ported." They're developed with consoles in mind and that changes the way they are developed than if they were developing only for the PC. That makes them console games. Like directional controls. That's a console scheme. Jurassic Park seems to be even more heavily influenced by console game design (despite the fact that you can't walk).

  • Yeah my point wasn't so much aimed at consoles specifically, just that there is still plenty of market interest in a good adventure game with good graphics.

  • @wilco64256 said: Every played Heavy Rain? Solid straight adventure game with excellent graphics. Sold extremely well.

    The success of one platform-exclusive game hardly refutes my point (which covers more than a decade). Besides, given that traditional adventure game mechanics are heavily supplanted with something borrowed from the action genre makes it a weak counter-example.

    I do think Heavy Rain is an example of something else for which there is a growing market -- the "interactive entertainment experience". I would not be surprised to see an avalanche of Heavy Rain clones; time will tell whether it's a fad or something sustainable. I think many adventure fans will see these games as meeting their adventure-gaming desires and be pleased to see more of them and with top-notch graphics; others, like myself who have a different idea about what's important in an adventure game, might not.

  • @MusicallyInspired said: Telltale's games are conformed to console standards. They aren't just "ported." They're developed with consoles in mind and that changes the way they are developed than if they were developing only for the PC. That makes them console games. Like directional controls. That's a console scheme. Jurassic Park seems to be even more heavily influenced by console game design (despite the fact that you can't walk).

    Yes, but most of TTG's games follow PC adventure game traditions. I'm not very familiar with console gaming as whole, but to me it seems that consoles have their own traditions which are different than PC's traditions. It doesn't just apply to adventures, but also to console RPGs etc. What I have read about Heavy Rain gives me impression that it's more a console game than traditonal computer adventure game.

  • @Olaus Petrus said: Yes, but most of TTG's games follow PC adventure game traditions.

    Not remotely. That's actually the main complaint that people who are concerned about what Telltale's KQ game will look like have. PC adventure games let you walk around and explore and stumble into deaths and get stuck. Telltale is against all of those things.

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