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"I've misfiled my glorious mundis!"?

posted by Debbie82 on - last edited - Viewed by 295 users

I noticed that when Guybrush and D'Oro bust Stan for selling a counterfeit Porcelain Power Pirates treasure map in Chapter 4, Stan responds, "I've misfiled my glorious mundis!" I suppose there's some spelling errors in Latin. Shouldn't it be "glorias mundi", since it is Latin for "glories of the world", and it is derived from the words "Sic transit gloria mundi" ("Thus passes the glory of the world")?

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  • It's been while since I played Tales, but I believe that he was referring to the actual maps as mappa mundi means world map. And it's intentional that his choice of words sounds bit like gloria mundi. In other words his just saying: "I misfiled my glorious maps."

  • Aha! So that's another Latin language parody/amalgam, just like the words "Sword of Lustitia", with the word "Lustitia" a parody/amalgam of the English word "lust" and the Latin word "iustitia", meaning "justice", also named for Lady Justice, the Roman goddess of justice, equivalent to the Greek goddess Dike, daughter of the goddess Themis. I understand now! Thanks! :)

  • @Debbie82 said: I noticed that when Guybrush and D'Oro bust Stan for selling a counterfeit Porcelain Power Pirates treasure map in Chapter 4, Stan responds, "I've misfiled my glorious mundis!" I suppose there's some spelling errors in Latin. Shouldn't it be "glorias mundi", since it is Latin for "glories of the world", and it is derived from the words "Sic transit gloria mundi" ("Thus passes the glory of the world")?

    Actually, if you want it properly pluralized, it should probably be "Gloriae Mundi" as Gloria is a first declension Latin noun (feminine) and Mundi is a second declension noun (Masculine). However, I doubt Stan actually meant to use the phrase 'Glories of the worlds', as Olaus Petreus already pointed out. It was probably just Stan using gratuitous Latin because Latin pops up in court terminology frequently since it was the language of the courts since before the Middle Ages.

  • Yeah. You know, at the beginning of Chapter 4, Stan comes up and says that he "had to in flagrante his delicto", which is a play on the words, "in flagrante delicto", which means "in the act of committing a misdeed", or "while performing sexual activity", equivalent to "caught red-handed". Weird.

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