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Jurassic Park : feasability, and other related prehistoric cloning projects.

posted by SWGNATE on - last edited - Viewed by 760 users

I created this thread to show the feasability of cloning dinosaurs and other prehistoric life. where science is at this point in time regarding the subject and some ideas involving prehistoric cloning... No trolling please..

i will be starting with my first argument that it is entireley possible.. my first refrence is here : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnudC9INVJ0

that to a degree solves wether or not finding ancient DNA is possible.
as far as filling sequence gaps i would not go with amphibians, instead i believe using DNA fragments from one of the 3-4 dinosaur mummies would be a more pure method.

9 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Oh its possible. It's just a matter of finding DNA. And then it's a matter of those people who don't believe in cloning to get with the program.

  • @waroftheworlds01 said: Oh its possible. It's just a matter of finding DNA. And then it's a matter of those people who don't believe in cloning to get with the program.

    http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/woolly-mammoth-cloning-project-fast-track-say-scientists

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKbR1bcze8A

  • Well they're already cloning the Wooly Mammoth so yeah.

  • Thanks for providing the link SWGNATE. Just a while ago, I also read an article connected with this sensational issue. Please allow me to share the link here. Check this out: http://www.newsytype.com/13798-clone-wooly-mammoth/.

    For many years, researchers have talked about the potential for cloning historic species. A wooly mammoth was always considered to be among the best prospects. Now, experts in Japan and Russia have agreed to interact in an effort to clone a mammoth by 2017.

    Moreover, albeit researchers intend to create a cloned wooly mammoth in 5 to 6 years, there are still queries about the ethics of this plan. There are strong polemics on both sides, and as researchers continue their work, the final deadline for decision and intervention will soon come.

    Now, what is your stand regarding this scientific issue?

  • I remember reading a published piece passed out by a local museum after the first movie came out as to why it wouldn't have worked. Their reasoning was it would have taken 50 years to go through the Dino's entire genetic code to fill in the gaps. If there was a single mistake they would have to start over.

    Mr DNA said in the movie if you looked at screens like the one simulated once a second for 8 hours a day it would take 2 years to read the entire strand. They worked around it by saying VR could break down a strand in minutes. I don't think that was possible with the day's computing power.

    And that's the trick. Those figures were done based on 1993 computing power. I think a computer I build tomorrow for 1000 would have 100x more processing power than a computer that would have cost a million in those days. Those figures need to be redone. DNA can be computed. The human genome was mapped.

  • I found this article a pretty interesting read - a Canadian paleontologist plans to manipulate chicken embryos to show he can create a dinosaur.

    "The idea for the project, Larsson said, came about during discussions with renowned American paleontologist Jack Horner, who served as technical advisor for the Jurassic Park films."

    Canadian scientist aims to turn chickens into dinosaurs

  • aligning sequence fragments is a relatively simple problem and was one of the key ideas behind shotgun sequencing, which was the precursor to modern-day genome sequencing. the cost of sequencing has also been dropping incredibly. the human genome, for scale, is 3,000,000,000 basepairs, or 3,000,000 kilobases. it would not be unreasonable to expect to have one's own entire sequence sequenced for under $100 in the next five to ten years.

    cost_per_megabase.jpg

    on a related note: within three months, i will have completed my master of science in bioinformatics from boston university. bioinformatics, for those of you who are unfamiliar with the term, is a field dedicated to using computers and math to manage biological data and try to withdraw insight in a way that intelligently guides experimentation. it's awesome. if you're interested in trying to bring dinosaurs back to life, studying bioinformatics is a good start.

  • Hey, I wrote up an entire article on my site about the concept's plausability, it's a regular feature I do on my site called Science Check. After playing through the JP game I decided to do my next article on the park, previously I've talked about rocket tanks.

    http://gamexcess.net/2012/01/25/science-check-jurassic-park/

    @hiplobonoxa said:

    on a related note: within three months, i will have completed my master of science in bioinformatics from boston university. bioinformatics, for those of you who are unfamiliar with the term, is a field dedicated to using computers and math to manage biological data and try to withdraw insight in a way that intelligently guides experimentation. it's awesome. if you're interested in trying to bring dinosaurs back to life, studying bioinformatics is a good start.

    If I got anything wrong or you have anything you want to contribute just tell me, I wrote it based upon my own scientific research because my previous science check contributers were physicists and chemists, not biologists or geneticists.

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