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Possible BTTF Season 2 ideas/speculation/suggestion

posted by itssas83 on - last edited - Viewed by 24.5K users

ok first things first, I have made this page in hopes of gathering some reasonable suggestions to making the possible BttF: Season Two more enjoyable, not so everyone can post whats been said a million times about the puzzle difficulty, so here goes...

Make Puzzles more Complex/Fun/Creative/Etc.. (its said, moving on...)

One thing I been thinking about a lot these past few days is Jurassic Park, and how it will be the first game that Telltale will give you the option, or misfortune, of dying. I was thinking that we can incorporate a similar concept into the BttF series, which i would like to call "Caught Scenes". In the next paragraph I take 2 examples of this concept and explore possible scenarios from season one.

1931, when you and Doc are getting ready to jump into the Delorean, Officer Parker walks up and tries to put an end to the fun. Well what if you failed to get the keys and jump in the Delorean in time, and Parker catches you. Would he shoot/arrest you and Carl Sagan, altering the future forever?

When you are back in 1931 hiding behind the tree, what would happen if you failed to lure your alt self away from that tree? "Caught Scene" begins of you coming face to face with your alternative self, breaking rule #1 of time travel, causing irreparable damage to the time space continuum?!?!

personally i have found that if your not allowed to generally suffer some type of consequences for your actions, and puzzles essentially play on a harmless loop, the game just becomes repetitive and kinda boring. As a BttF fan, i think this would also be an exciting and safe way to explore the consequences of time travel and paradoxes etc. without having to have it play into the actual storyline. this alone could lead to some really exciting ideas.

as we know from the "its a wrap" video, telltale listens to us at the forums and values our opinions. this is a great chance to give our two cents, for whatever it might be worth! even if they use just use one or two suggestions everything can make a difference!

607 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Toneiiblue said: A prequel showing Marty meeting Doc for the first time. Whole 5 episode season is spent sweeping his driveway, walking Einie, buying his groceries & the like. THAT would be great gameplay. ;) Mixing things up will be minigames of attending detention, writing essays & sneaking out to spend the night with Jennifer. Twin Pine Malls will cameo in Episode 3 where Marty gets his first job working at the Burger King.

    :D

    That sounds like the perfect game too me :D

  • Ok, enough with the "I think there will be time travel in it" "jokes", actually post something meaningful like Toneiiblue did.

    @Toneiiblue said: A prequel showing Marty meeting Doc for the first time. Whole 5 episode season is spent sweeping his driveway, walking Einie, buying his groceries & the like. THAT would be great gameplay. ;) Mixing things up will be minigames of attending detention, writing essays & sneaking out to spend the night with Jennifer. Twin Pine Malls will cameo in Episode 3 where Marty gets his first job working at the Burger King.

    :D

  • Okay, just finished the game and might i add...FANTASTIC.
    I loved the entire concept and the end....holy crud.....totally came out of left field.

    (below is a tiny spoiler. read at your discretion...i'm new to this so i don't know how to change the colors)
    So, at the end of the credits, it said "to be continued..." like it did in the sequel movie. any thoughts on an upcoming story line??? I'll be honest, the whole three martys threw me off, but sooooo cool at the same time!!! what do you think will happen??? (cause i am clueless......)

  • Agreed, the last episode was more fun then a barrel of monkeys, when the cop vanished mid sentence, then the town, it was a pretty great idea! Here is hoping for a second season! I actually enjoyed the young Emmet stuff, I maybe in a minority but wouldn't mind a second season involving him in some way again. I think we have had enough of Edna though lol

  • So, now that we're all done and finished with season one, let's see if we can't think up plenty of ways--and I'm sure we can--to improve upon what we saw in this first season to turn Back to the Future: The Game into an actual game.

    First off, significantly tighter writing needs to be applied. I'm talking serious work, with some real thought to it. Telltale seemed to be far too used to working on games with nonsensical premises like Sam and Max that didn't take themselves too seriously, and it shows in the writing of BttF:TG where it is often very cartoony, something that fits Sam and Max but doesn't quite fit BttF, at least not in the same way.

    Secondly, the episodes need to flow much better, preferably by having one writing team for the entire season instead of splitting up episodes the way they did. As Rather Dashing has pointed out often, issues are resolved as if they never happened and in general things just don't flow. Again, this is probably due to how Telltale is used to operating--again Sam and Max show their faces here, since the episodes rarely had much in common with each other in their various seasons, apart from Season Three.

    Thirdly, graphics need to be tightened up. I'm not a graphics kiddy by any means--I grew up on stuff like Commander Keen. So long as graphics are servicable I'm usually fine with what's presented. But in this particular case, things were just plain painful to watch, particularly animations of walking, turning, etc...it baffles the mind that the same people that made such a good looking Sam and Max season in three did this.

    Fourthly, we need some significant puzzles. I'm talking real puzzles, not "HEY LOOK THAT LIGHTS UP HIT THAT." Along with this goes actual interactivity, real exploration, a useful inventory, and so on and so forth. Now, I'm not necessarily asking for free reign with the DeLorean here--probably be best for each episode to, say, stick to a small number of eras/times that Marty could go to, for instance, rather like the fourth episode of Sam and Max season two.

    So, what are your guy's thoughts and suggestions?

  • As much as I loved this season, there is one thing that would have made it better. A real sense of peril. A couple of the chase scenes kind of did this, but, as Dashing has pointed out, there's no consequence for failure. That alone would go a long way towards making this more of a game in some peoples' eyes. Plus it'd be fun to see what they could come up with.

  • User Avatar Image
    Flo

    "Peril" in adventure games is a double-edged sword. This isn't an action game where quick reflexes are expected, but critical thinking. Not being able to "fail" harkens back to the Lucasfilm/LucasArts games of old, which were much more forgiving than their contemporaries (Sierra, I'm looking at you). Being able to do the "wrong" thing and end up either dead or in a dead end would change the entire tone of the game.

    I agree that the game seems a bit too "cartoony" in its puzzles (and in particular, their solutions) at times. Though that's not entirely unexpected given the stylized look of the game.

    What disappointed me the most as far as gameplay is concerned is that BttF seemed like a step back from Tales of Monkey Island. Where'd the combination puzzles go all of a sudden? On the other hand, dialog puzzles seem overused given the overall "lack" of total puzzles.

    And while this might seem contrary to everything I've said so far, I hope that season two tries to diverge from the movies. To me, season one's ending signaled that "anything goes". Run with that! Let your imaginations run wild and try something outside the game's established 1885-to-2015-with-more-or-less-alterations timeline. Whether that means going further back or ahead, or causing more drastic alterations... Back to the Future doesn't strike me as the kind of franchise that should take itself too seriously.

  • I absolutely agree with Kyronea's points, especially in regards to animations. The animations looked like amateur work and we all know TTG can do better.

    It also would be improved had the player had the sense that time was running out and there were several things that had to be in place within a short period of time. Like the scene with the lightning hitting the clock tower in the first movie; it was intense and fast-paced because of all these things kept going wrong while time was running out.
    The game just completely lacked puzzles in that spirit. There needs to be ways to run out of time, and ways to die, even if they implement a retry option.

    And of course the puzzles need to be significantly scaled up in difficulty. The ability to combine items in the inventory, more things to interact with in the game world and unique responses for using items in the world. Generic responses the way we just had is just lazy and gives no entertainment value.
    There should be more areas to explore, even if some areas are not relevant to any puzzles in one particular episode they should just keep them to dumbfound players so that they are forced to try maybe 20 different things before finding the solution.
    And to make it extra challenging, why not make it so every time you fail/die/run out of time the game fries your CPU so you're forced to buy a new one? I'd like that.

  • User Avatar Image
    Flo

    @caeska said: There needs to be ways to run out of time, and ways to die, even if they implement a retry option.


    I respectfully disagree. An adventure game can be challenging without deaths or dead ends. And Back to the Future in particular isn't the "right" kind of property for this. Time travel as portrayed in the series presents a wonderful opportunity to fix mistakes.

    Do you really think that, if they had missed the lightning bolt in the first movie, Doc and Marty would have simply given up? In my opinion, no way. They would have found another solution and Marty would still have gone back to the exact point in time he ended up at in the movie as we know it.

    The game's implementation of "trying again" might not be the most elegant (in fact, it's rather Sam-&-Max-ish in its "whoops, let's try that again" methodology), but Back to the Future as a whole doesn't strike me as the kind of universe where you'd ever truly run out of contingency options.

  • @Flo said: I respectfully disagree. An adventure game can be challenging without deaths or dead ends. And Back to the Future in particular isn't the "right" kind of property for this. Time travel as portrayed in the series presents a wonderful opportunity to fix mistakes.

    Do you really think that, if they had missed the lightning bolt in the first movie, Doc and Marty would have simply given up? In my opinion, no way. They would have found another solution and Marty would still have gone back to the exact point in time he ended up at in the movie as we know it.

    The game's implementation of "trying again" might not be the most elegant (in fact, it's rather Sam-&-Max-ish in its "whoops, let's try that again" methodology), but Back to the Future as a whole doesn't strike me as the kind of universe where you'd ever truly run out of contingency options.

    I personally believe that if you can take as much time as you want to solve a puzzle, or whatever, it removes the peril from said situation.

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