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IGN is worried...maybe TellTale should listen?

posted by Shadowknight1 on - last edited - Viewed by 1.2K users

http://ps3.ign.com/articles/118/1183778p1.html No need to copy/paste the whole article. He addresses most things that we've been worrying about. Pacing, animation, gameplay...TellTale, please read what he has to say and take it into account.

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  • I dunno... I can agree on stiff looking characters... but them talking about the "Rex waiting" and stuff is ridiculous .. This is a game they need the player to be able to make choices..

    I think its a good fit.. TTG has in my opinion turned in a pretty solid story in the past.. and the gameplay they are proposing is new for them I can see it working well... I know that it might not but I am pretty sure its going to be a fun game... and I anticipate it being true to franchise.. more so than Back to the Future.

  • The characters are stiff looking, and the animations don't feel fluid is the main thing I agree with. I hope they're woking on that. But I don't remember seeing scenes where the dinosaurs just stood there. I mean, you have a limited time to hit these buttons. Unless they're talking about an area of the game that we haven't seen yet, I call bull sh!t on that.

    Anyway, I think that as far as a TellTale game, this is looking awesome. The story seems solid, I like the adventure style gameplay with Heavy Rain mixed in and I just love the fact that we're on Isla Nublar again. This is looking good for a telltale game.

    I think what it is is that when people think dinosaurs on an island they automaticly want to explore. They want to just go out and looks at things. They basicly want a Trespasser. I'm all for that kind of game as well. But we have to stop and remember that this is a TellTale game. They do adventure and storytelling. Not FPS and Platforms. We have to think inside the TellTale universe.

  • I think they got to play IN the Visitor's Center. Not sure though, he mentioned "Busting in" and "Hiding behid a pillar". Plus look at that little screen shot on the bottom.

  • Come to think of it. If the character is standing still then the T-Rex would be just standing there. Cause she can't see you if you don't move.

  • That thing about the T-Rex waiting is nonsense, maybe the T-Rex just need time to check the location and locate the prey. But the girl falling on the nose of the T-Rex? Sound very overrated.

    I must agree with the stiff characters and animations, thats a major problem anyone has with the game right now, they better fix that properly!

    About the pacing, I must agree there also. I dunno, it just kinda feels overrated at times, I mean the action sequences in the first film were very dosed, most of it was suspense with some peaks of action, in the game there are sequences with non-stop action, but not as good directed as in a "real" movie. I cannot really name what doesnt feel right, but at least I know now that I'm not alone with this feeling.

    I know we cant expect anything else gameplay-wise from telltale, but I understand that people dont care about that, they just want a proper JP-Game they can look forward too and dont have to worry about if the animations will look better in the final game or if the gameplay really will be good enough...

  • My biggest graphical problem other than the animations is the Dilophosaurus frill. It looks like crap.

  • @Shadowknight1 said: http://ps3.ign.com/articles/118/1183778p1.html No need to copy/paste the whole article. He addresses most things that we've been worrying about. Pacing, animation, gameplay...TellTale, please read what he has to say and take it into account.



    While they're at it, they should take this into account, too: "Even if the game is more expository than exhilarating, this is Jurassic Park in all the right ways. Just know going in that it's a bit boring to actually play."

    @Shadowknight1 said: I think what it is is that when people think dinosaurs on an island they automaticly want to explore. They want to just go out and looks at things. They basicly want a Trespasser. I'm all for that kind of game as well. But we have to stop and remember that this is a TellTale game. They do adventure and storytelling. Not FPS and Platforms. We have to think inside the TellTale universe.

    The lack of exploration is a departure from adventure games, not a feature of them. Adventure games invented exploration in gaming, long before there was any such things as shooters and platformers. If you want to defend the lack of exploration in this particular game, that's fine. But please stop staying lack of exploration is justified on the basis of it being an adventure game; such a statement is laughable to anyone with any familiarity with the genre, and to keep repeating it is just willfully ignorant. Explorable gameworlds are an essential part of adventure gaming and they're well within "Telltale's universe":

    flotsam.png

  • By exploration, I mean 3D free roaming like in Oblivion or GTA. Point and Click Adventure games are all very linear or at least have only a small area to explore. Unless you can find me a point and click adventure game that features a large scale free roaming like in Oblivion or GTA where you can go anywhere you want when ever you want I'm gona have to stick with my statement.

    I was just saying that some gamers want a FPS free roaming Jurassic Park game and that's why a lot of people feel uneasy about a linear adventure Jurassic Park game.

    As for me, I like the direction Telltale is going with this game and I can't wait to play it.

  • Yeah adventure games where immersive and seemed heavy on exploration back in the 80's and 90's but nowadays when people think of exploring and immersion they think of games like GTA IV, Oblivion, fallout 3, Arkham Asylum.. or Tetris.. ok not tetris.. When compared to some modern games Adventure games are pretty light on content... not that they have to be mind you.

  • @waroftheworlds01 said: By exploration, I mean 3D free roaming like in Oblivion or GTA.



    Exploration is not defined by 3D graphics, or any kind of graphics for that matter: the first adventure game was all about an explorable gameworld and didn't have graphics at all. Exploration is not defined by control scheme; gamepad, keyboard or point-and-click are equally valid methods for moving a character. Exploration is not defined by continuity; maps and other kinds of "express travel" devices are more common in adventure games than other genres, but that doesn't make exploration any less important.

    @waroftheworlds01 said: Point and Click Adventure games are all very linear or at least have only a small area to explore.

    Wrong. Very few adventure games have linear gameworlds. I posted that screenshot to specifically show a game that, like the vast majority, allows the player to explore a variety of locations in any order they wish. The number of and size of locations vary widely among adventure games, but even in an adventure game with a relatively small gameworld, exploration is still an essential component of gameplay.

    Apart from the recent trend toward free-roam sandbox style games, non-linearity was just as common in shooters and action-adventures as it was in adventures. It varied from game to game in all genres. Play Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Father or Myst or Grim Fandango, compare it to a shooter like Doom 3 or a typical platformer, and then talk to me about linearity. :rolleyes:

    @waroftheworlds01 said: Unless you can find me a point and click adventure game that features a large scale free roaming like in Oblivion or GTA where you can go anywhere you want when ever you want I'm gona have to stick with my statement.

    Okay... King's Quest; most games in the series apply but let's take KQ2. Note that that map is not incorporated in the game -- players had to actually explore and discover the environment for themselves. The gameworld represented in that image is totally continuous and free-roam.

    @waroftheworlds01 said: I was just saying that some gamers want a FPS free roaming Jurassic Park game and that's why a lot of people feel uneasy about a linear adventure Jurassic Park game.

    There are gamers who complain about every title that isn't free-roam sandbox; countering such complaints is easy even without mischaracterizing the adventure genre as you have repeatedly done. The serious criticisms come from the perspective of long-time adventure gamers -- or any gamer who relishes being immersed in a richly interactive gameworld -- lamenting the lack of any exploration, not caring whether that exploration is "free-roam" or the more traditional kind of exploration in gameworld-oriented games, the full range of adventures, shooters, platformers, etc.

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