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tension and characterisation of King's Quest games

posted by karmo on - last edited - Viewed by 119 users

Hi,
I hope my English don't screw up my post too much.
In King's Quest game being stuck with puzzles itself creates tension, so complex story telling tehniques aren't neccessarily needed to keep player's intrest up. Same time intro works as hook and outro creates feeling that all this adventuring lead something to that is wortwhile.
Part of story telling in King's Quest series as whole is adding layers in sequels. It also let's build characters from game to game. Heroic Graham comes heroic and lonely Graham in KQ2, heartbroken Graham in KQ3 without beeing seen untlil late in game. In KQ4 with sole power of intro Graham comes vulnerbale not in soul only as in KQ3 but also physically vulnerable to age.

Karmo

3 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I think what you're trying to say is that King's Quest is more about the puzzles than the plot. And yes, that's true. Hopefully Telltale will remember that. I'm not saying they should forget about plot, of course, but after Back to the Future, I definitely hope they don't forget about puzzles. :p

  • @RAnthonyMahan said: I think what you're trying to say is that King's Quest is more about the puzzles than the plot.


    I think there is more to that. While sometimes people complain that puzzles pull them out of story in some games, it can also be seen this way that too complex story telling techniques distract from puzzle solving and /or exploration.

  • @karmo said: I think there is more to that. While sometimes people complain that puzzles pull them out of story in some games, it can also be seen this way that too complex story telling techniques distract from puzzle solving and /or exploration.

    I agree completely.

    And your language barrier didn't confuse your message one bit. Kudos! :)

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