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Should this game be cancelled?

posted by Anakin Skywalker on - last edited - Viewed by 1.9K users

Be honest, fan groups and their groupies. Should KQ stay dead unless a fan group gets it? Should TT's game be cancelled?

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  • I enjoyed the Strong Bad games too -- I wasn't familiar with the characters when I started playing the series, but now I have little PVC Homestar Runner figures watching over my desk.

  • @BagginsKQ said: Rather Dashing, Trogdor, and that whole sequence are taken directly out of Peasant's Quest. Pretty much... It's also quite a bit more silly than King's Quest, a complete parody...

    Wasn't Trogdor first introduced in a Strong Bad E-Mail?

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @lattsam said: Wasn't Trogdor first introduced in a Strong Bad E-Mail?

    Sure was.

  • The poll options are not collectively exhaustive of all/most responses to the question at hand.


    [LIST]
    [*]No, I don't want the game cancelled, but I am not "open-minded" about it either. I am skeptical and frustratedly calloused toward TTG about it.
    [*]Yes, I would rather the series ended with just the 7 core (point-and-click) games.
    [*]Yes, I think AGDI/IA would have been truer to the franchise with the finished product than TTG will be, but I think they would also take for-fricken-ever getting around to completing it, even if it was their only project;
    [*] so No, I don't think another fan group deserves the license instead.
    [/LIST]

    Your poll is too restrictive about the choice of motivation behind which answer is given, so it is not a properly balanced selection which is why I have not voted.

    Also, what I want and what happens are two different things:

    [LIST]
    [*]I want such a game to be as true to the core series as possible (of which I don't personally include MoE);
    [*]I want the developers to realize and implement what aspects of the original games that hardcore fans loved most about them, rather than targeting casual gamers;
    [*]I want to know how the project is progressing, since it is currently the only project TTG is (supposedly) working on that I care about whatsoever;
    [*]and I want the game to be developed/released in a reasonably timely fashion.
    [/LIST]

  • I resent the implication that only "hardcore" fans liked the unique features of Sierra style adventure games. There are plenty of of adventure game fans (enough to pledge hundreds of thousands of dollars to those kickstarters) who aren't so hardcore that they would, say, devote years of their lives to creating faithful point-and-click VGA-style remakes of 16 color parser games. ;) It's not a matter of being a "hardcore" fan of Sierra style adventure games. It's simply being a fan of GOOD point and click adventure games, in any style.

    Telltale simply doesn't make good point and click adventure games anymore. Period.

  • @Lambonius said: I resent the implication that only "hardcore" fans liked the unique features of Sierra style adventure games. There are plenty of of adventure game fans (enough to pledge hundreds of thousands of dollars to those kickstarters) who aren't so hardcore that they would, say, devote years of their lives to creating faithful point-and-click VGA-style remakes of 16 color parser games. ;) It's not a matter of being a "hardcore" fan of Sierra style adventure games. It's simply being a fan of GOOD point and click adventure games, in any style.

    Telltale simply doesn't make good point and click adventure games anymore. Period.

    I would have to agree with this. It's not only hardcore fans. Sierra was indeed unique, and I too have a BIG soft spot for the VGA era Sierra games. In truth, Sierra's adventure games are really the ONLY adventure games I like, except for LA's Indy games and Myst. I tried but could never get into other adventure games.

    Sierra had an awesome interface, an awesome way of presenting the story and game, the puzzles, etc--No adventure game I've ever played has lived up to Sierra's standard. I

    I guess if I were to re-evaluate why I've been so open minded about TT's KQ is because I don't want KQ to stay dead. I love it, and I'm very open minded, so long as a game retains the spirit and atmosphere of the series or retains the magic in some way--even if in a meager way--I'd support it. I guess I'm starved for KQ, who knows?

    I've always been very flexible in terms of game formats--I loved KQ7 and KQ8 which strayed from the VGA era formula greatly. And I also do have a liking for the "interactive movie" kind of adventure game--I loved Phantas. To be honest, I love the idea of a KQ game in the interactive movie format (I don't mean live action, but the interactive movie feel) of Phantas so long as it retained the spirit--if it didn't go too dark. My big gripe with BTTF for example was that the world seemed too limited and too repetitive and that the game held you by the hand and that there was too much focus on characters instead of exploration. But the format itself--an interactive movie--could work with KQ, if done right, if the world was still large and interactive, if it was challenging, etc.

  • @Chyron8472 said: The poll options are not collectively exhaustive of all/most responses to the question at hand.
    ...
    Your poll is too restrictive about the choice of motivation behind which answer is given, so it is not a properly balanced selection which is why I have not voted.

    Seriously. This isn't a poll; it's a temper tantrum.

    There are plenty of posts in this forum wherein people have explained (in sometimes excruciating detail, or maybe that's just my posts LOL) why and how they have arrived with negative feelings toward Telltale making a KQ game. Different mindsets, different starting points, different conclusions.

    Read them, and then construct a poll in which there's an honest attempt to devise choices covering the opinions that people actually have rather than paranoid delusions about their motivations. Then you'll have a poll in which people might actually care to place a vote. (Except I think it's already been done, somewhere down the list.)

  • @Anakin Skywalker said: But the format itself--an interactive movie--could work with KQ, if done right, if the world was still large and interactive, if it was challenging, etc.

    In the way I've been using the term, "interactive movie" is mutually exclusive with large (assuming you mean non-linearly large) and challenging. So I'm not really sure what you're talking about when you say "interactive movie".

  • @thom-22 said: In the way I've been using the term, "interactive movie" is mutually exclusive with large (assuming you mean non-linearly large) and challenging. So I'm not really sure what you're talking about when you say "interactive movie".

    Hmm.
    Something sort of like the direction in terms of format that KQ7 was taking things in (I don't mean cartoony graphics or tone) but with a narrator and increased interactivity. Something I suppose like BTTF but much harder with a narrator and the ability to die, with real puzzles, but with the sort of cinematic feel BTTF has. What do you mean by non-linerarly large, in terms of the world?

    Sierra/Roberta had always dreamed of KQ and adventure games becoming more and more cinematic, more like a movie where you were the actor, director, and audience all at once. I'd like to find some happy, more modernized, medium between TT's approach, the approach of the VGA era games, and the approach Sierra was taking with games like KQ7 and Phantas. Some perfect combination which is both "modern" yet also traditional enough so as not to piss everyone off. I want to see something NEW done to the genre, in some ways, while not straying too far away from KQ's traditional boundaries.

  • @Anakin Skywalker said: Hmm.
    Something sort of like the direction in terms of format that KQ7 was taking things in (I don't mean cartoony graphics or tone) but with a narrator and increased interactivity. Something I suppose like BTTF but much harder with a narrator and the ability to die, with real puzzles, but with the sort of cinematic feel BTTF has. What do you mean by non-linerarly large, in terms of the world?

    The size of the gameworld means little to me if it's nothing but a single corridor. Put a true-to-life model of Route 66 from LA to Chicago in a game and it would be huge, but if it's nothing but the highway there's no real exploration, and that's not an adventure to me. It's hard to see what you're getting at when you explain by reference only: like game x except this, like game y except that.

    @Anakin Skywalker said: Sierra/Roberta had always dreamed of KQ and adventure games becoming more and more cinematic, more like a movie where you were the actor, director, and audience all at once.

    Well then Telltale has been trying to fulfill Roberta's dream. Except it has resulted in less interactivity, and you keep saying "more". I'm not sure that you can fully reconcile the two, that trying to do both won't automatically result in something less than either. I mean, it's been tried long before Telltale and mostly rejected, as PC Gamer noted in a recent review:
    Yes, Jurassic Park: The Game is an unwelcome trip back to the interactive movies of the ’90s, somehow surviving their extermination like one final smallpox virus hiding in a dung beetle’s arse. It’s 3D instead of FMV, but you’re still stuck doing little but hitting keys as they flash on screen and trying to convince yourself you’re in control.

    Telltale said during development they wanted JP to be like you were directing a movie. But that's not the movie-related job players ended up with, also accurately depicted by PC Gamer (emphasis added):
    You’re the projectionist, your only real job being to keep the film running smoothly until the end credits finally roll.

    Presumably Roberta had something different in mind, but it's meaningless without some proof of concept. If you think you know what it is, then explain it in concrete terms.

    Telltale's use of the cinematic camera, dialog close-ups, its talent in crafting cut-scenes, staging scripted events etc. are all things I really appreciated about Telltale's adventure games (along with above-average writing). KQ7 did some things along those lines much more than its predecessors, other adventure game developers were doing and continued to do the same, but Telltale really brought a level of quality that I would be happy to see in a King's Quest game.

    But those things are just trappings. They can enhance an already good game but they're not a substitute for one. It seems the praise Telltale received for those things went to their head and they began (at least as early as The Devil's Playhouse) emphasizing the trappings and neglecting interactivity. And this was not a failure of execution, it was a deliberate design decision, to make "cinematic adventures" (or what I think are more accurately described as trivially interactive content-delivery systems).

    So I don't know if a Sierra-style game with Telltale's trademark cinematic-ness ca. 2008, or at least pre-BTTF, is close to what you mean by a happy medium. It sounds good to me, but they have to get the Sierra-style game part right first! I will remain skeptical, and even negative, until I see some indication that Telltale is willing to do that.

    One last quote from PC Gamer, because I can't resist:
    Dear interactive movies: Go away, go away, go away. And get eaten by dinosaurs. Thank you very much.

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