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Anyone else feel like the writer for Episode 5 ignored everything set up in Ep 4?

posted by viruscarrier on - last edited - Viewed by 858 users

Having digested the ending for a few days, I'm starting to realize a few issues I've had with the ending, and a good number of them seem to likely stem from the fact that episodes 4 and 5 have different writers.

1. Ben's treatment
For those who saved Ben in Episode 4, I feel like the writer for Episode 5 completely missed what the one for Episode 4 had been building up for the character. After his series of ****-ups I expected there to be some redeeming moment (or hell, even just an attempt at one). Instead, all we got was Ben falling to his death and providing no closure for his character arc.

2. Kenny's treatment
Related to the above. This probably doesn't come into play with the Christa version, but it makes absolutely no sense from what we've learned about Kenny in the previous episodes for him to just randomly flip on his opinion of Ben so much that he would just sacrifice himself for absolutely no reason. Honestly, he could have just shot Ben much sooner and escaped just fine, but I guess the writer felt that an uncharacteristic suicide was in order.

3. Omid and Chrsta's fate.
This was also pretty bad. No matter what you tell the two of them, the simply disappear without an explanation. Clem doesn't find them and they certainly don't find you before you turn. What the hell was the point of the option then telling them what they should do? Was it really that hard for Telltale to make just 3 scenes depending on what you tell them to do that shows their fate? Hell, for instance, if you tell them to find the boat it could cut to a scene where they get attacked and killed by a horde near the harbor. If you tell them to wait for Clem it could show them meet up, or fail to meet up even. To simply have them disappear forever without any explanation is poor closure and poor writing.

4. Clem's Parents.
This was by far the worst handled segment of the entire series. For all the build-up towards finding her parents, all we got out of it was a 10 second segment where Lee falls unconscious and Clem almost freaks out. For something they've been building up since Episode 1, the essential hand wave of "hey here they are" and instant removal was simply insulting. I honestly can't believe they thought this part was going to be well received. Another chance at actually solidifying a character arc that they simple dropped the ball on.

Not to mention the fact that it is simply illogical that Clem would see her parents right next to each other. I mean really, what kind of mega coincidence is that?


Well, those are my main gripes with Episode 5. On a positive note, I found the Lee and Clem final scene to be rather well done, as I did the arm removal scene. The Part where Christa just starts cutting before I could even finish my response was both an oh **** moment and one that made me laugh.

50 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Its the walking dead **** happens

  • Can't agree with you on everything in this post, but I do agree with your 4th point. The brief interjection of Clem's Zombified parents was the only let down of episode 5 for me. I was expecting a more intimate, although painful, moment like when Lee had to kill his brother. I feel like that would have been a more meaningful interaction prior to the finale of Lee's death.

    I admit that TTG had their hands full bringing such a powerful story together, but this would have been one moment that I feel would have added to the finale in a very positive way. Nevertheless, it still has my vote for game of the year!

  • I think Episode 5 completely ignored the entire game. It was short, very simple, and "resolved" the build up from the previous episodes quickly and in the most boring way possible.

    I don't see how you can spend 2-3 episodes building up the guy on the radio and the boat only to make the actual climax so short and anti-climactic. Episode 5 completely ruined the series for me. I thought that the choices I made in the previous Episodes would finally affect something in the game, but they didn't. I also expected the finale to be very tense, but it was lackluster and borderline boring.

    For all of the setup for a big finale, they sure dropped the ball.

    And enough with the "It's a Zombie Apacolypse, this is what would happen." excuse. Using that excuse, it would have been perfectly acceptable to have Lee accidentally fall off the bridge with the tanker on it to his death and have the game end there....

  • "You're nitpicking." - Typical Poster

    "I for one, thought it was masterful, you just don't understand the literary genius of TellTale, they can do no wrong. HERESY HERESY!" - Typical Poster

    "It's the Walking Dead." - Typical Poster.

    "You just mad Lee died." - Typical Poster.

    I agree with most of your points. The reason it ended so badly was because it was rushed. Maybe deadlines, but the writers wrote themselves in a corner when Lee got bit and when Clementine was kidnapped. That really put restrains on them. The game was linear before, but at least previous episodes gave you the feeling of something larger.

  • @Sabiancym said: I think Episode 5 completely ignored the entire game. It was short, very simple, and "resolved" the build up from the previous episodes quickly and in the most boring way possible.

    I don't see how you can spend 2-3 episodes building up the guy on the radio and the boat only to make the actual climax so short and anti-climactic. Episode 5 completely ruined the series for me. I thought that the choices I made in the previous Episodes would finally affect something in the game, but they didn't. I also expected the finale to be very tense, but it was lackluster and borderline boring.

    For all of the setup for a big finale, they sure dropped the ball.

    And enough with the "It's a Zombie Apacolypse, this is what would happen." excuse. Using that excuse, it would have been perfectly acceptable to have Lee accidentally fall off the bridge with the tanker on it to his death and have the game end there....


    Your choices did effect the way characters interacted with you. You just have a very narrow way of thinking what choices actually means. I think the way they did it was just fine. What were you expecting? The guy to have laser beam eyes and to be able smash through wall? Turn into a mega zombie? Everybody live happily ever after? That is not what walking dead has ever been about and that is not how life works. This is not suppose to be a feel good story. You have to explain how you think it could have done better?

    @Sabiancym said: "You're nitpicking." - Typical Poster

    "I for one, thought it was masterful, you just don't understand the literary genius of TellTale, they can do no wrong. HERESY HERESY!" - Typical Poster

    "It's the Walking Dead." - Typical Poster.

    "You just mad Lee died." - Typical Poster.

    I agree with most of your points. The reason it ended so badly was because it was rushed. Maybe deadlines, but the writers wrote themselves in a corner when Lee got bit and when Clementine was kidnapped. That really put restrains on them. The game was linear before, but at least previous episodes gave you the feeling of something larger.


    If you thought that it gave you a feeling of something larger that you have greatly misunderstood the whole story. It was never about something larger.

  • I was honestly expecting a confrontation between bitten Lee and Clementine's mom, and her attempting to kill Lee or keep Clem away from him at all costs or something similar. I'll admit i was a bit disappointed it didn't turn out that way.

  • @CrazyandProud said: If you thought that it gave you a feeling of something larger that you have greatly misunderstood the whole story. It was never about something larger.

    Not really. You clearly don't know what I mean by larger. It gave me the feel of a world gone to hell. The opening car ride where you see police head into the city gives the game a much grander feel. You travel, meet new characters, and experience the struggle to survive in a broken society for the first 4 episodes. Yes, they were linear, but they didn't feel that way. Episode 5 felt confined and linear and lost a critical tone in the series.

  • Guys, it's annoying as hell when you try to objectify typical fans of The Walking Dead game, much of whom liked the finale, as brainless sheep who blindly defend Telltale or are incapable of engaging in thoughtful discussions about the game. Seriously, stop. Shit, half the time when I try to have a reasoned conversation with someone on these forums who *didn't* like the game -- while explaining why I did -- I'll get trolled or some bizarrely defensive or hostile reply. Or I'm completely ignored, because I guess fighting with people online is more fun?

    You're allowed to dislike the game, or the ending. But this crap about "typical Telltale fans" is irritating and counterproductive. I liked the game and think the company has a good grasp of narrative structure. I liked the ending, which had been foreshadowed throughout the previous episodes, and see absolutely zero evidence that the game was rushed in any capacity. Does that make me a fanboy?

  • @lucidity02 said: Guys, it's annoying as hell when you try to objectify typical fans of The Walking Dead game, much of whom liked the finale, as brainless sheep who blindly defend Telltale or are incapable of engaging in thoughtful discussions about the game. Seriously, stop. Shit, half the time when I try to have a reasoned conversation with someone on these forums who *didn't* like the game -- while explaining why I did -- I'll get trolled or some bizarrely defensive or hostile reply.

    You're allowed to dislike the game, or the ending. But this crap about "typical Telltale fans" is irritating and counterproductive. I liked the game and think the company has a good grasp of narrative structure. I liked the ending, which had been foreshadowed throughout the previous episodes, and see absolutely zero evidence that the game was rushed in any capacity. Does that make me a fanboy?

    If it doesn't apply to you, why are you offended? I'm a TellTale fan and I fit none of those stereotypical descriptions I listed as a joke. I'm not ripping on fans, I'm ripping on those forum posters who head to every thread with criticism of the game doing exactly what you said, blindly defending TellTale. There's a lot of them, dude.

  • @Doctanian said: Not really. You clearly don't know what I mean by larger. It gave me the feel of a world gone to hell. The opening car ride where you see police head into the city gives the game a much grander feel. You travel, meet new characters, and experience the struggle to survive in a broken society for the first 4 episodes. Yes, they were linear, but they didn't feel that way. Episode 5 felt confined and linear and lost a critical tone in the series.


    And you no longer feel the world has gone to hell? Did you really expect to have the last episode about meeting new people and traveling when it's the final episode in the season? It's confined for a reason.

    Confined and linear are not tones.

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