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The wolf among us and society

posted by Mega-Nashame on - Viewed by 160 users
I know some people are gonna think this sounds stupid but i think The Wolf Among Us should be used in experiments/tests. The choices everyone has made (which you learn at the end of the game) always has me thinking. Two examples are killing the crooked man or sparing him and letting Georgie die in agony or killing him. Lots of choices like these were usually 50/50 which surprises me and its quite interesting. So thats why i think this.

Also i only finished The Wolf Among Us today because my Xbox broke just before Cry Wolf ( I had a season pass and played from the beginning) and i waited for two weeks trying to fix it.Eventually i just figured it might be stuffed and just bought it again on PC and played through it again. Great final episode. What did you guys think?
4 Comments
  • I had that thought. I know a couple of college professors and we've talked about this and other Telltale games. I actually just made the comment to one of them that if I taught ethics, I'd probably have my students play it.

    I know that there was an instructor at a school in Norway who let his students play The Walking Dead season 1 for his ethics class. Gamasutra did an article on it, but I can't post the link right now. You can look it up, though. I think TWAU would be just as useful. Plus it has different dynamics. In TWAU, you have to make decisions as someone who has a checkered past that everyone is actually aware of. That makes it interesting.

    Loved the final episode. :)
    • I found the Polygon article.

      www.polygon.com/2014/1/17/5320314/norwegian-high-school-students-the-walking-dead-video

      and the Gamasutra article as well:

      www.gamasutra.com/view/news/208850/Norwegian_school_using_The_Walking_Dead_to_teach_ethics.php
  • ...did your students adult?
    • Well, I don't teach. :) But, I think it would be ideal for students 18 and up. Younger than 18 and (at least in the states) it would probably require permission slips or something because of the rating and subject matter. The article said that the Norwegian students were "upper secondary" students.
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