User Avatar Image

OnLive - Possible new distribution outlet for Telltale?

posted by natlinxz on - last edited - Viewed by 179 users

I saw OnLive on one of my youtube subscriptions, and I think telltale should get in on this action! There is a spot on their website for developers to contact them! How about it? :)

http://www.onlive.com/contact.html?partners

16 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I personally don't believe OnLive is gonna be a better option for gaming in the forseeable future. Streaming the game from an outside source? Imagine the lag between inputs and actions, and when they actually occur on your screen. Not to mention the bandwidth requirements for such a venture (assuming you want to play with a high resolution/graphic settings). They may claim to have found new algorithms to reduce the bandwidth needs and improve performance, but really I'll believe it when I see it.

    This might work for turn based strategy games and the like, but I can imagine it would get frustrating even with point and click adventure games. Nothing will match having a capable machine in the same room as you.

    Edit: I hate to sound really negative, but the concepts and values they've stated for OnLive are currently totally unfeasible (<1ms latency???? You'll never see that with a LAN!). These sound like statements made by marketers and not by engineers. It's a nice theory, but likely still a few decades away.

    Also my response doesn't really contribute to the idea of TellTale jumping on the bandwagon.. I suppose I should have posted this in the other thread mentioning OnLive.

  • @Krodge said: I personally don't believe OnLive is gonna be a better option for gaming in the forseeable future. Streaming the game from an outside source? Imagine the lag between inputs and actions, and when they actually occur on your screen. Not to mention the bandwidth requirements for such a venture (assuming you want to play with a high resolution/graphic settings). They may claim to have found new algorithms to reduce the bandwidth needs and improve performance, but really I'll believe it when I see it.

    This might work for turn based strategy games and the like, but I can imagine it would get frustrating even with point and click adventure games. Nothing will match having a capable machine in the same room as you.

    Edit: I hate to sound really negative, but the concepts and values they've stated for OnLive are currently totally unfeasible (<1ms latency???? You'll never see that with a LAN!). These sound like statements made by marketers and not by engineers. It's a nice theory, but likely still a few decades away.

    Also my response doesn't really contribute to the idea of TellTale jumping on the bandwagon.. I suppose I should have posted this in the other thread mentioning OnLive.


    Yes, but the guy who made OnLive also invented video compression, which was also unbelievable at the time. Now, he is practically reinventing online streaming, and there won't be noticeable lag.

  • Even if this works perfectly (which is fundamentally impossible but that's not part of this argument) I doubt it'll ever catch on.

  • @natlinxz said: Yes, but the guy who made OnLive also invented video compression, which was also unbelievable at the time. Now, he is practically reinventing online streaming, and there won't be noticeable lag.

    I realize this, in fact the guy who started OnLive is also the guy who started QuickTime. Simply put, video compression/streaming is still far from perfect as it is. I'm just saying based on the technology we currently have, this system is still far from a working phase.

    Maybe when the whole world is finally connected through optical fiber, and that technology has improved, and they have a server farm the size of Texas, and ISPs will ignore OnLive access in regards to bandwidth limitations/caps, then this system will have a fighting chance. Currently it just seems a little too far-fetched to me.

  • Thanks for "borrowing" this from my thread natz. I thought it could use its own thread. :p

    As for your concerns Krodge, they're all addressed in the video I posted in my InstantAction thread. Basically, they're creating three server hubs. One for the west coast, east coast and the midwest. I can't remember specifically but I think it was that you can only play with others in your same hub. Should definitely watch the video though, it addresses all of the questions about ISPs, latency, etc.

  • Thanks for posting the link tobar. Unfortunately I'm still quite skeptical...

    Especially towards the end when they're answering questions, and they mention working on exceeding the speed of light, and the fact that a computer that can stream Crysis with full graphics to hundreds of thousands of people is "relatively inexpensive." I don't even wanna know what his opinion of an "inexpensive" subscription plan would be.

    I could always be wrong though, these guys really could be modern voodoo witches who are breaking the laws of physics.

  • I think he had his tongue in cheek when he said that stuff about trying to break the speed of light. Will be interesting when this hits beta.

  • I'm pretty hopeful about this. Sci-fi becomes reality all of the time. So, while this may seem impossible, I won't write it off just yet.

  • @tobar said: I think he had his tongue in cheek when he said that stuff about trying to break the speed of light. Will be interesting when this hits beta.

    I wish I could sign up for Beta, but it says "continental US" only. A Canadian that owns a mac will never get ANYWHERE in the gaming world. :(

  • It's a curious thing. Not really worth a lot of hype to me, personally. I saw it, went "...huh.", and didn't think much of it.

    I mean, if it works, that's nice. What will their policies be towards content? Is it subscription? Pay by the hour? I'm not exactly sure if these have been answered or not.

    Basically, I want a free demo of a high-quality game, just a level or two. If it runs flawlessly, I'd consider using the service to cut strain on my hardware.

Add Comment