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Phoenix Wright and Monkey Island

posted by hplikelike on - last edited - Viewed by 142 users

Just a little question to those Phoenix Wright fans out there, are there any similarities between the two series? I realize that it may be blasphemous to say this on a forum with people who have actually played the MI game, (which I haven't... yet), but it seems to me that both games use multiple dialogue options, and use items to solve puzzles.

Compare and contrast below. And if you want to correct my, eh, "ignorent assumptions", I would be much more appreciative if you point out the error of my ways politely instead of trying to start a flame war. Thank you.

12 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Both are completely different, but great games.
    Yes there is puzzle solving and dialogue, but Monkey Island is using the right dialogue at times, and is constantly finding items, combining, and zoliving puzzles with them, aswell as a progressing story.
    Whereas with PW, you find your items in one half, and get information, then you have a court case where you have to use the item at the right time, or press for more information at the right time.
    They both have great humour in them though, so if you like the wit of PW and problem solving games, you will love Monkey Island.

  • I have not played those games... I'm pretty sure my kids have them on NintendoDS though.

  • I have no idea who or what Phoenix Wright is, but I'm certain that Monkey Island is better.

  • They're both adventure games. There's a distinct difference between the culture of Japanese and Western adventure games though.

    Adventure: Denotes any game where the emphasis is based on experiencing a story through the manipulation of one or more user-controlled characters and the environment they exist in. Gameplay mechanics emphasize decision over action.

    Characteristics
    Puzzle solving, or problem solving
    Narrative, or interactive story
    Exploration
    Player assumes the role of a character/hero
    Collection or manipulation of objects
    Fantasy world or immersive environment
    Mystery or situation about which little is known
    The player embarks on a quest

    Japanese adventure games are influenced by games like Snatcher, Policenauts and Phoenix Wright.
    They're dialogue-driven and usually played from the first person perspective.
    Sometimes all you need to do to advance the story is to talk to everyone and exhaust the dialogue options.
    Seems like Japanese adventure games are more down to earth. It's common to play as a high school student, detective, lawyer or something along those lines. Character designs are predictably whacky for the most part though.

    Western adventure games are influenced by games like King's Quest and Monkey Island.
    The story is driven by puzzles and you play from a third person perspective.
    Progression isn't really halted if you can't figure out a puzzle because there's usually something else you can do.
    A lot of adventure games are based on fantasy and the character designs are usually more realistic.

  • serweet and Ravey, you both give well done comparisons/contractions. I especially find the cultural contrast interesting. Where do you find out info like that, or are you just good at pointing it out? (Cause what you say is pretty true.)

  • Pheonix Wright is good, but it's a bit repetetive. Most of the puzzles are fairly simple and require you to just click on everything and talk to everyone. I prefer Monkey Island for it's humour and difficult puzzles.

  • @Fury said: Pheonix Wright is good, but it's a bit repetetive. Most of the puzzles are fairly simple and require you to just click on everything and talk to everyone. I prefer Monkey Island for it's humour and difficult puzzles.


    The only problem with that, is that some of the Phoenix Wright puzzles (in my opinion) ARE hard. So, either MI's going to be impossible, or they're just different. (Like painting and composing music).

  • They could hardly be more different

  • There are enough similarities that if you liked Phoenix Wright, you'd like Monkey Island, and vice versa. You might think one or the other is better, but they're both charming, funny, and clever adventure games.

    The puzzles in the Monkey Island series have generally been harder than the ones in the PW series, but if you're starting with either this Telltale series or the SoMI remake, there'll be in-game hint systems which are generally pretty good at giving you enough of a nudge that you won't ever be stuck for long. And you can try multiple combinations without abusing the save/quit system! ;)

  • @LuigiHann said: There are enough similarities that if you liked Phoenix Wright, you'd like Monkey Island, and vice versa. You might think one or the other is better, but they're both charming, funny, and clever adventure games.

    The puzzles in the Monkey Island series have generally been harder than the ones in the PW series, but if you're starting with either this Telltale series or the SoMI remake, there'll be in-game hint systems which are generally pretty good at giving you enough of a nudge that you won't ever be stuck for long. And you can try multiple combinations without abusing the save/quit system! ;)



    Ah yes, abusing the save system is a must in PW to the point where it seems pretty useless.

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