User Avatar Image

Short attention span?

posted by Jonasb78 on - last edited - Viewed by 292 users

You write in your FAQ: Short attention span? No problem, our games are designed to be finished up over a weekend or in a few evening sessions, so you'll get that sense of satisfaction in completing what you've started. No long, frustrating stretches of being stuck, either. In our games, the characters increase their power of suggestion if they detect you're stuck. Yep, they really are that smart.

This is a BIG problem for me...:mad: I feel that a majority of new games has been dumbed down alot! and one of the thrills with Monkey Island was the fact you could get really stuck from time to time, the more the hurdle the greater reward when solving it. The general public ain't stupid, I will feel cheated of the experience if the characters start blabbing about what I should do next if I get stuck for a while. That's like having a built in spoiler, or someone on a cinema who has seen the movie starts yapping about what's going to happen.... :mad::mad::mad:

I do hope you prove me wrong, but after reading the FAQ my excitement really dropped.

26 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • It's supposedly possible to turn off hints.

  • I wouldn't mind knowing where it's says "supposedly possible" or even hints of it being possible. If you got any ideas where it may say so please post a link.
    No offense I'm just very disappointed right now.:(

  • From the pre-order forum

    [quote]Of course, the Telltale hint system is also there as it is in all of our games, so if you decide that in your old age you'd rather be entertained by a Monkey Island game without it crushing your very soul in the process, you can turn the hint frequency up. (Alternatively, you can turn hints off, too, of course.) [/quote]

  • Not played any of the previous games?

  • [quote]and one of the thrills with Monkey Island was the fact you could get really stuck from time to time, the more the hurdle the greater reward when solving it.[/quote]

    When looking back at the old games, people often mistake the thrill of *finally* figuring something out after a long period of being stuck, for enjoyment over being stuck. Figuring something out is fun. Not knowing what to do and being stuck isn't fun -- it's frustrating. Our games are designed to give you more "a-ha!" moments without forcing you to sit through the agonizing days/months/years of not knowing what to do next. (Or, to put it another way, without forcing you to turn off your game, go online, search out a walkthrough, read what you're supposed to do, and say "How on earth was I ever supposed to figure THAT out?!")

    This isn't new - all of Telltale's games are designed this way. It's a different design philosophy than the adventure games of the 1980s / 1990s, but since most players have neither the time nor the patience for getting stuck that they had twenty years ago, it tends to work out okay. :)

  • @Emily said: without forcing you to turn off your game, go online, search out a walkthrough, read what you're supposed to do, and say "How on earth was I ever supposed to figure THAT out?!")

    My thoughts exactly. Some of the puzzles in LucasArts adventures (though the games as a whole are very good) are extremely hard to figure out and very illogical, and there's nothing enjoyable about that. I haven't found any of those in the Telltale productions and that's one of the reasons they're so great.

  • The ready availability of hints also makes you want to keep playing. I remember many times in adventure games where I would get so frustrated with a puzzle, I'd turn the game off completely for days at a time because it would upset me so much (my soul bruises easily).

    Now I just have to get past my ego if I really need help. Because while it's nice to have hints at those really frustrating parts, it's also nice to say, "Yay, I iz smart!" and stroke your own fragile self-esteem.

    ...Not that I'm speaking personally, of course.

  • Can you turn these hints on or off?
    If not then I too am a bit worried about this.
    I don't want to feel like I'm racing to complete a puzzle in order to beat it without hints.

  • Games COULD be that difficult back then because walkthroughs weren't as easy to acquire as jumping on the internet and looking one up. In fact there were hint lines that you had to pay to call where you could get hints, or you could buy hint books. Not being willing (or able) to spend money forced players to figure things out on their own. The result of which I believe people mistakenly think back on the experience as positive, rather than negative. I'm not one of those people. I do not enjoy being stuck for long periods of time. I felt defeated and not smart enough to complete the game. If I finally did figure out a certain puzzle it would excite me that I finally did it but not because I figured it out, but rather because I got lucky and stumbled upon something I never noticed before. Or through trial and error combined all my inventory objects on every other object I could interact with and something finally happened. That's not figuring things out. And even those instances were few and far between. And looking up a walkthrough on the internet feels like I'm cheating and ruining the experience. So a game design that doesn't enforce either of those things is a good thing in my book. Times change. People change. Game design changes. Things will never be the same.

Add Comment