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To anyone worried about the copy-protection in online distribution...

posted by Anonymous on - last edited - Viewed by 556 users

I seem to be seeing complaints about ppl not wanting to have to go online to play.

This isn't STEAM people. You don't have to be online every single time you want to play. At least, Texas Hold'em was that way. Just a single connection when you purchase the game, and it's unlocked from then on. You only have to go back online if you reinstall for some reason.

And judging by the number of replies in these forums, I'd imagine you all go online at least enough to be able to do that nearly every day, if you wanted to.

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    Anonymous

    Steam also only requires you to be online when you install it, you can easily play the games in offline mode as much as you want to :)

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Steam also only requires you to be online when you install it, you can easily play the games in offline mode as much as you want to :)[/quote]

    But if Valve go belly-up, Steam dies, and you want to install and play Half-Life, you're stuffed.


    My *new* understanding of the Telltale system is that you have to be online to purchase and download the software, but everything else, installation, playing, uninstallation, loading saved games, etc. is at your (offline) discretion.



    ...Right?

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    Anonymous

    [quote][quote]Steam also only requires you to be online when you install it, you can easily play the games in offline mode as much as you want to :)[/quote]

    But if Valve go belly-up, Steam dies, and you want to install and play Half-Life, you're stuffed.


    My *new* understanding of the Telltale system is that you have to be online to purchase and download the software, but everything else, installation, playing, uninstallation, loading saved games, etc. is at your (offline) discretion.



    ...Right?[/quote]


    Well, Hold-em requires you to validate your copy once per install. If the company goes under they will provide a patch or alternate service that negates this requirement.

    Simple really.


    I assume Valve do the same. I honestly thought HL-2 requires you to be online when you run the damn thing so that you get the latest updates rammed down your throat.

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    Anonymous

    [quote]I honestly thought HL-2 requires you to be online when you run the damn thing so that you get the latest updates rammed down your throat.[/quote]

    If I remember correctly, that's how it was untilmany people got the [insert expletive synonym for 'rather irate'] and they released a patch (via steam) which allowed offline play.


    So if the Telltale installers require online validation once per install, those of us who don't have the machine they wish to play the game on connected to the internet will never be able to play it.

    Sounds like a system that alienates quite a few potential buyers. I know that that sort of thing puts me out of the buyers circle.

  • [quote]So if the Telltale installers require online validation once per install, those of us who don't have the machine they wish to play the game on connected to the internet will never be able to play it.

    Sounds like a system that alienates quite a few potential buyers. I know that that sort of thing puts me out of the buyers circle.[/quote]
    Yeah, it's tough, I know. But people need to upgrade their own technology. For example, it sucks having to buy an XBOX 360 to just because you want to play XBOX 360 games (even though you have the original XBOX), but you just have to suck it up and do it, because that's how things have to be done.

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    Anonymous

    I also think it should be distributed via CD/DVD/thumbdrive... So people who live under a rock can get it too...
    Also, theres people with dial-up...

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    Anonymous

    [quote]Yeah, it's tough, I know. But people need to upgrade their own technology.[/quote]

    Actually, it's the other way around. To avoid malware/spyware/virus risks, a lot of people are using a seperate machine for the internet to their main productivity box.

    So I'm running UNIX and Mac OS systems that I'm happy to allow online, but as for my work machines and my gaming system, they sit on an isolated network.

    I have to say that since I adopted this philosophy, I've had fewer issues with maliscious software, and a far higher level of general stability and control.

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    Anonymous

    How would you do that?
    And what does that do?
    Wha? :-/

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    Anonymous

    A good cheap way to do this is have two routers each operating as a NAT in tandem.

    My mate runs a webserver and he puts that on the outside network and puts it in the DMZ so it has full access to the Internet but the internat network is protected by the second router if the DMZ computer becomes compromised from all its ports being exposed. Quite clever actually.

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