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Q&A With the Team

posted by Jake on - last edited - Viewed by 10.3K users

Welcome to the secret forum! As a thank you for pre-ordering, we've created this little backstage area where you can hang out with the development team, keep an eye on the development of Tales of Monkey Island, and hopefully get your hands on things before we go wide with them to the public.

First off, though, let's start a Q&A thread!

Any questions you've got for the development team, ask 'em here!
We'll try to dogpile this thread with high quality facts and higher quality lies conversation!

1.5K Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Looks pretty cool. Somehow the color and style remind me the old logo of The Scummbar made by Bill Tiller a few(?) years ago.
    Personally I would have preferred the banner and text aligned in the center, but I guess you wanted to do something different :)
    Anyway, good job!

  • @Jake said: Tried to get a little of the LeChuck's Revenge logo feeling in there.

    Bearded Guybrush, Zombie LeChuck... LeChuck's Revenge really is the team's favourite episode? Or at least the main influence for ToMI?

  • @Zomantic said: Bearded Guybrush, Zombie LeChuck... LeChuck's Revenge really is the team's favourite episode? Or at least the main influence for ToMI?

    I hope so!

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    Ry Guy Telltale Staff

    @Zomantic said: Bearded Guybrush, Zombie LeChuck... LeChuck's Revenge really is the team's favourite episode? Or at least the main influence for ToMI?

    Well, zombies are just cool! But, the pox is different than zombies.. you'll see it affects people differently than just zombababifying them, more like a jaundice with one helluva fever. You'll also notice, Mr. Lechuck isn't decaying, he is actually quite pristine! Although, he probably stinks to high heavens.

  • @Ry Guy said: Well, zombies are just cool! But, the pox is different than zombies.. you'll see it affects people differently than just zombababifying them, more like a jaundice with one helluva fever. You'll also notice, Mr. Lechuck isn't decaying, he is actually quite pristine! Although, he probably stinks to high heavens.

    Perhaps...perhaps...*deep booming echoing voice* WITH THE VOODOO POX HE FEEDS ON THEIR VERY SOULS....*wide eye'd expression*

    *laughs* Nah.....

  • Rubber chicken with a pulley in the middle? Red Herrings? Gopher repellant? :p

    On a serious note though, what about English subtitles? As I'm hearing impaired, it seriously affects my enjoyment of a game if it's speech only (and makes it unplayable for the Deaf!) Please tell me there will be a text option (which includes intro's, cut-scenes, etc...)

    Now for more funny - MI the movie, anyone?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_unbVaCe8a4

  • @seanvanaman said:
    This is the most sequential, interconnected story Telltale's ever told. Mike and Mark have a glorious plan for the arc of the entire season and we hope to be revealing as many questions as we do answers to the series' questions every month. I get psyched just thinking about it.

    Telltale, I could kiss you. I'm glad I ended up buying SBCG4AP twice, knowing that it helped to fund your continued awesomeness.

  • Oh no! *Covers his ears* Lalalalalalala! (I'm trying to avoid spoilers here!)

    (Yes, I know, spending all my days in these forums isn't the best way to do that... But how else could I bear the agony of waiting till July?)

    Anyway, thanks for the answer, Ry! I really admire the work you're doing with TMI (or ToMI... I keep changing this helluvanacronym): all characters look great so far (no-one's commented on Voodo Lady's new make-up, very haunting), and I also love the few setting sketches we've seen. :)

  • While I'm okay with ToMI being harder than S&M, I do have to say that it should not be as hard as, say, MI2. The puzzles should be similar in style, but not unfair or illogical. I think even Ron Gilbert has pointed out this problem at some point...

    In general, it's like puzzles were made to defeat the player and satisfy the designer, rather than to make the player feel satisfied when they finally work it out. They tend to be based on the developer's logic, so that you could only follow their line of thinking from the method to the solution if you had made the game. This wouldn't be so bad if you already knew where point B was, and merely had to find the path from A to B, but sometimes you aren't even sure what you're trying to do or what your starting point is. There are too many gaps in the player's knowledge for clever thinking to be enough. When you have no idea if you're even on the right track, and the game gives you no indication, you can spend an hour doing the wrong thing, or you can spend an hour ALMOST doing the right thing, then give up and try a completely different (wrong) track. It stops being fun and off to the Internet for spoilers we go. I even noticed this more recently, when I played the almighty Grim Fandango. You're trying to work out both what your goal is, and a way of getting there. You have no pieces of the puzzle to start filling it in, and often a massive inventory with a billion time-wasting combinations to work with (this is why I want a MI2 remake) - but you don't even know if you have the item you need or if you're accomplishing nothing.

    It wasn't until Telltale showed up with Sam & Max that Adventure games really became what they should be (although I loved the original S&M as well). You were far more likely to have a point B - or more often, C - to aim for, or a point A to start from, and it was possible to work it out with your OWN logic, not by reading the developer's mind. (Again, MI2 tended to make it worse because you had access to so many different places that you had no idea where you could currently make progress or if you were wasting time, or if you needed an item from a completely different place to progress in this one.) That's what makes a puzzle really fun. Maybe I'm just impatient, because I played the MI games in the era of the Internet, but I did need to check a FAQ and the result was often "I never would have gotten that", without endless trial and error and running around between five different places I was stuck at with no indication of how what I was doing even related to my quest.

    Of course, the other way it could be done, to give the player some indication of what the hell they're trying to do so that they could work out how to do it, is a hint system, which we know Telltale are now using. I think that having one of those as an option is a good way of opening the genre up to people who have been wary of it for years (and I know many people like that). I don't personally intend to make much use of the hint system unless the puzzles ever become unfair again (which I doubt because it's Telltale), but just having that last point in the puzzle, a goal that the player still needs to work out how to get to themselves, is the perfect way to do it. Don't give me hints that tell me what to do and how to do it, give me hints that tell me what I want to achieve. Which ideally, the games should have done in some form in the first place, and some of the classic ones didn't.

  • Well, if you can't get Earl Boen... your replacement vocal artist should listen closely to what Boen does with a line like "Ooooooo, the lass has spirit!" in CMI.

    That ain't no half-assed demon-pirate voice. That's Character.

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