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Question about Steve Purcell

posted by Mel on - last edited - Viewed by 128 users

I've had a thought in the back of my mind that popped up again when I reread the Sam&Max webcomic. I looked at Steve Purcell's Wikipedia entry and it said he attended the California College of Arts and Crafts. In reading his webcomics and even vaguely remembering lines from Hit the Road (I've not read any of his print comics. :o ), I would have guessed he had some sort of medical or scientific background.

How many comic writers use medulla oblongata, talk about neurons and think of using ethylene glycol e.g.? :eek: I'm curious about the infusion of science into his comics and if anyone knows what inspired/inspires him to use it. I love it by the way. :)

If this question's been asked before, sorry. I couldn't find anything.

3 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I suppose Steve Purcell is just interested in science? Just like Uderzo and Goscinny must have been fascinated by ancient history when they came up with Asterix. In fact, you'd be amazed at the research some comic artists put into their work. It's not very different from writing literature really, where you have to at least do a little research about your subject. And things like parts of the brain and chemical substances are more in the realm of popular science than of academic science, methinks.

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    Mel

    @Haggis said: I suppose Steve Purcell is just interested in science? Just like Uderzo and Goscinny must have been fascinated by ancient history when they came up with Asterix. In fact, you'd be amazed at the research some comic artists put into their work. It's not very different from writing literature really, where you have to at least do a little research about your subject.



    You're probably right he likely has a big interest in science (esp. biological sciences it seems). The only other comic/graphic novels I've read are The Sandman series. I'm always impressed when authors in whatever medium do meticulous research.

    And things like parts of the brain and chemical substances are more in the realm of popular science than of academic science, methinks.

    Not necessarily. There is a lot of neuroscience research happening at the university level given how little we still know of the brain and also disease research (both mechanisms of disease and potential therapeutics). :)

  • Of course there's still a lot of research going on, but to give an example, I've heard the term "medulla oblongata" in a Muppets game as well, which is generally aimed at kids, and things like how the brain works are subjects that are well-liked by the general reader of pop-science mags or viewer of National Geographic/Discovery Channel. :)

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