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Question regarding purchasing TOMI

posted by Davies on - last edited - Viewed by 299 users

I have really been looking forward to playing both TOMI and SOMI:SE but I was saddened to find out that I am unable to play SOMI: SE because it requires you have Steam (and thus an Internet connection). I do not have an internet connection on the PC I use for gaming (and can not afford one), so my question is:

Am I able to purchase TOMI on my dad's Mac (or on the PC at my social club) and then burn the installer to a DVD-R, to play on my PC when I get back home?

I really hope the answer is yes because, frankly, all this Internet connection requirement for every F***ing single player game released these days is forcing me to give up on new games and I don't think that's fair! I've already had to miss out on the likes of Bioshock, The Orange Box (and all the games within), Stalker and GTA IV.

Infact, things are so bad that when I purchased a boxed copy of the game Auidosurf a while back, I only realised an Internet connection was required once I got back home. The writing stating such was in a tiny (and we're talking almost unreadable) font on the lower part of the box (not even within the system requirements box).

Anyway, the shop I had purchased it from refuse to give refunds unless the game is broken (thanks GAME, hmph), so I ended up having to download a pirated and cracked copy of Audiosurf just so I could play a game I'd already payed for. Now, if this is the state of things then can someone please explain to me how this overprotective DRM is a good thing? Also consider that EA recently took a risk and scrapped DRM for the Sims 3 and it went straight to No. 1 in the charts... says it all really!

Anywho, sorry about the long rant but I really hope that you're going to tell me that I will be able to play TOMI because if not then gaming can go F*** itself (sorry for coming across as mega-angry but I'm just so upset at missing out on SOMI:SE when I've waiting so damn long for a new MI release). I look forward to your response, Thanks.

21 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Rather Dashing said: Telltale's response times have been pretty good, actually. I've never waited more than a day for a response from Telltale support, and on a good day I've gotten a reply within *minutes*.



    The thing is I'd have to send the request from someone else's computer, so I might not be able to play until the following day or so (when I'd be able to access a computer again to check the response). I admit that's nitpicking though because it's more to do with the fact I don't agree with DRM in the first place. I think I should be able to download from Telltale, burn to a DVD-R and play straight away on my PC at home. I'm not up to no good, so why should I have to e-mail Telltale to prove so (see the mother analogy in my earlier post).

    @Rather Dashing said: The DVD just uses a disc check, as long as it's in line with all of their DVDs since...at least Sam and Max Season Two.

    I think you misread my post?! I was saying that I will wait for the DVD for this very reason ;)

  • You can't blame them for assuming most of their customers have easy access to the internet, because downloading is the main method of distribution. And there are far worse DRMs out there, Telltale's is fairly non-invasive.

  • @Rather Dashing said: Yes. A game with a multi-million dollar budget and mass market appeal sold a lot of copies.


    Nope, because to go back to my previous example of EA and the Sims 3... before they released the Sims 3 without DRM, EA was by far the worst offender for over the top DRM (to the point of only letting you install a game a certain number of times).

    EA is a multi-million dollar company with games that have a mass market appeal and yet they had all this DRM because they feared that they would lose many sales due to piracy. Because so many people (people like myself) complained about to EA about the DRM, they decided to release Sims 3 without any and it went to No.1 in the charts. Ditto Fallout 3.

    I appreciate that Telltale aren't a multi-million dollar company with mass market appeal but do you really believe that if they dropped the DRM from their games, that all of a sudden they'd go bust? Or even lose out on a profit that they otherwise would have made? I seriously doubt it!

    I mean to say if there was no DRM on TOMI, would you have got a pirate copy instead? Of course not! Infact, If I wanted to, I could download a pirate copy right now but I won't because I want to support Telltale and I'm willing to bet that 99% of Telltale customer's would feel the same. So, why the DRM? If I want a pirate copy, it's there and anyone who doesn't want to pay but still play, already has done so, in spite of DRM.

    @Rather Dashing said: Actually they don't. The check is done *once*. Once the check goes through that one time, it doesn't ask for activation again. You can play it offline and you can play it online without it doing anything.
    I didn't realise this before and I admit that that's a fairly low level of DRM and that's somewhat positive but it's kind of a 'lesser of two evils' situation in my opinion.

  • @corruptbiggins said: You can't blame them for assuming most of their customers have easy access to the internet, because downloading is the main method of distribution. And there are far worse DRMs out there, Telltale's is fairly non-invasive.



    There's a lot of people out there, like me, who use the Internet at locations other than their home. So whilst Telltale is right to assume that most people have easy access to the Internet, are they right to assume that said access is via their own gaming rig?

    Actually, I really feel this thread has moved way beyond it's original purpose. I feel as though I'm talking politics and about DRM in general, as opposed to Telltale in particular (who at least have an option of getting an activation code). I just hope I'm not stepping on anyone's toes by voicing my views :confused:

  • User Avatar Image
    viz

    @Davies said: Viz, that's an interesting solution that I wasn't aware of. I don't suppose you know how much that might cost me and also would I need to subscribe to some kind of provider (such as a phone company or AOL)?



    You can get a pay as you go usb dongle as shown below from o2 although all major companies provide similar service, using this you would pay only for what you used (in addition to the dongle itself):

    http://shop.o2.co.uk/promo/o2mobilebroadband/tab/Pay_and_Go

    Enter your postcode here to check they have coverage for your area if not try another provider:

    http://webgen.o2-uktech.com/postcodeChecker

    If you wanted a more permanent solution you could get a standard wi-fi dongle that connects to an existing local network. You mentioned in your original post that you dad has internet access, if he currently connects through a router ask him if it has wireless capability. If so you can connect direct to it using a dongle such as this:

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/94526

    If he does not have a router (or one that incapable of wireless) it may be worth considering acquiring one and then networking both computers to use it. :)

    You can get cheap routers such as the one below also from ebuyer but find out what his connection is first before buying hardware (is it cable, adsl or dial-up etc etc):

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/132429

  • @viz said: You can get a pay as you go usb dongle as shown below from o2 although all major companies provide similar service, using this you would pay only for what you used (in addition to the dongle itself):

    http://shop.o2.co.uk/promo/o2mobilebroadband/tab/Pay_and_Go

    Enter your postcode here to check they have coverage for your area if not try another provider:

    http://webgen.o2-uktech.com/postcodeChecker

    If you wanted a more permanent solution you could get a standard wi-fi dongle that connects to an existing local network. You mentioned in your original post that you dad has internet access, if he currently connects through a router ask him if it has wireless capability. If so you can connect direct to it using a dongle such as this:

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/94526

    If he does not have a router (or one that incapable of wireless) it may be worth considering acquiring one and then networking both computers to use it. :)

    You can get cheap routers such as the one below also from ebuyer but find out what his connection is first before buying hardware (is it cable, adsl or dial-up etc etc):

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/132429



    Thanks so much Viz, that's really helpful. Much appreciated :)
    Unfortunately, I can't share my dad's connection because he lives in Surrey, which is about an hour's drive from my house. So I think I can rule that particular option out ;)

  • User Avatar Image
    viz

    @Davies said: Thanks so much Viz, that's really helpful. Much appreciated :)
    Unfortunately, I can't share my dad's connection because he lives in Surrey, which is about an hour's drive from my house. So I think I can rule that particular option out ;)



    Ah I see, that does stretch the range a tad, I'd go for the pay as you go option in that case. :D

  • Telltale doesnt get it quite right here.

    For starters the Demo is way, WAY, too short. You can´t judge by the Demo if this game is interesting to you or not. At least you should have let me walk around in the city.

    After a few Minutes into the full game on a friends pc, i choose to preorder it. If i would have only played the demo, i would have never bought this. So yeah, quite ironic.

    I´m gonna put this baby on 3 Computers max., so i don´t expect the DRM to kick in. At the end of the Season, we´ll get a Season DVD which (hopefully) will only feature the standard cd check. I´m fine with that. If there would be no season DVD, i would have either bought this game on Steam (no Securom afaik), or not at all. I only accept the Activation as a temporary solution, because, let´s face it, it won´t stop piracy anyway.

    And we´re customers, so we have a right to speak up.

  • @Davies said: Nope, because to go back to my previous example of EA and the Sims 3... before they released the Sims 3 without DRM, EA was by far the worst offender for over the top DRM (to the point of only letting you install a game a certain number of times).

    EA is a multi-million dollar company with games that have a mass market appeal and yet they had all this DRM because they feared that they would lose many sales due to piracy. Because so many people (people like myself) complained about to EA about the DRM, they decided to release Sims 3 without any and it went to No.1 in the charts. Ditto Fallout 3.

    I mean to say if there was no DRM on TOMI, would you have got a pirate copy instead? Of course not! Infact, If I wanted to, I could download a pirate copy right now but I won't because I want to support Telltale and I'm willing to bet that 99% of Telltale customer's would feel the same. So, why the DRM? If I want a pirate copy, it's there and anyone who doesn't want to pay but still play, already has done so, in spite of DRM.



    I seem to recall Spore selling extremely well despite its incredibly invasive DRM. Granted those copies were mainly sold before the anyone knew how bad the DRM was. Also, while while some people might be able to easily download a crack and easily use it, there are a good number of people who will most likely try this and get frustrated with trying to use the crack and whatnot and will eventually decide to just purchase the game since it would be easier to deal with (which wasn't the case with Spore when it was actually easier to download illegally).

    Another thing that DRM does (as Dashing kind of alluded to) is to cause guilt. If I walk into someone's yard, no big deal right? But if I hop someone's fence into their yard, then most likely I will feel at least some kind of guilt.

    So while I tend to agree that most retail releases have too much DRM, a company like Telltale that releases direct downloads needs this kind of DRM because it would make it a lot easier to pirate and the unknowing kid who just wants to play a game with monkey in the title might search for it on google and find it on megaupload or rapidshare.

  • Back to the actual topic, SMI:SE is also available via D2D:
    http://www.direct2drive.com/8241/product/Buy-The-Secret-of-Monkey-Island(R):-Special-Edition-Download

    I don't know anything about how the DRM works here, maybe someone else can shed some light. But you don't need Steam so it *may* work for your problem. At the very least, it looks like it might have manual activation.

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