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What's your theory about the ending of Monkey Island 2 - LeChuck's Revenge?

posted by pilouuuu on - last edited - Viewed by 9.4K users

Here is mine (obviously full of spoilers about the game):

I think that all anachronisms like cereal boxes, Grog machines, etc are there just for fun as well as the fourth wall breaking stuff like "pirates talked like that" and the Lucasarts phone in the jungle. An amusement park is perfectly normal in a world like this.

My theory is that Big Whoop is a portal. Maybe it travels to different times. Maybe Guybrush went back in time to when he was in his childhood and his parents were alive. That's why his parents wear pirate clothes. Big Whoop is like a time machine.

Maybe LeChuck is really his older brother which went bad when Guybrush was just a baby and left just to become a pirate. His parents never told the truth to Guybrush.

Le Chuck's plan in to go back using the Big Whoop and kill Guybrush while he is a child. After that maybe prevent himself from dying?

Just my theory. I don't believe that "all is a dream" rubbish. It would simply suck in something as brilliant as Monkey Island.

Guybrush and Lechuck are brothers. Le Chuck cast a spell on Guybrush to confuse him. Big Whoop creates a portal to another time when Guybrush was a kid.

252 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @PariahKing said: My theory is the explanation at the end of CMI, because it's canon and accepted in the game's storyline. What Ron would have or wouldn't have done isn't relevant until if and when he makes his game.

    That's also how I feel about it.

  • @PariahKing said: Wall o' Text

    I agree with most of that as well, especially the bit about not deifying Ron, because as you said, without Dave and Tim we'd be looking at a VERY different Monkey Island.

    I honestly think Ron gets WAY too much credit for Monkey Island. I mean, yeah he was a big part of it, but he wasn't the ONLY person who made it. Lucasarts (or Lucasfilm Games, as it were), at the time Gilbert was there, had a HUGE collection of amazing talent, without whom I don't think Monkey Island would've been a success, no matter how close Ron was standing to the game as it was made.

    There is no question that Curse of Monkey Island is a great game and gives suitable explanation to the ending of MI2, but people want to believe there's some ancient mythical brilliant "secret" that Ron holds that will somehow make the games 10 times better if he tells us.

    I wouldn't hold my breath.
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  • I don't know about anyone else, but "that whole amusement park revelation was just a trick" explanation is far more unsatisfying to me than "everything is imaginary" or even "Guybrush is or can be a little boy". It just does seem to toss out that ending in a way that doesn't feel like it ever had any weight to it, when it really felt like it should have been more important in the grand scheme.

  • @Rather Dashing said: I don't know about anyone else, but "that whole amusement park revelation was just a trick" explanation is far more unsatisfying to me than "everything is imaginary" or even "Guybrush is or can be a little boy". It just does seem to toss out that ending in a way that doesn't feel like it ever had any weight to it, when it really felt like it should have been more important in the grand scheme.

    Based on the track record of "everything is imaginary" endings in TV shows, movies, etc. I'd have to say that "everything is imaginary" is BY FAR the worst way to end anything.

    I'd much rather have the ending be "stay tuned for the sequel" than "nothing you've accomplished has been real in any sense of the word"

  • I think "it's all just imaginary" is basically a cop out to end something when you didn't really have an ending planned which is why it seems so unsatisfying to me. That's also why I choose not to believe it.

  • It's a computergame. It's surreal at times. It's supposed to make you laugh, not psychoanalyze or make something religiously one-street-there-exists-no-other-roads of it. It's a game. We play. For fun. To enjoy. Critic that.

  • @Pale Man said: Based on the track record of "everything is imaginary" endings in TV shows, movies, etc. I'd have to say that "everything is imaginary" is BY FAR the worst way to end anything.

    I'd much rather have the ending be "stay tuned for the sequel" than "nothing you've accomplished has been real in any sense of the word"


    But why? It never did have any weight to begin with, it was a game. You participated in a fantasy. Whether Guybrush himself was fantasizing along with you, does that really change anything? The characters are still amazing, the story, the puzzles, they're all still there and they're all amazing. Is it really so wrong to have the world be in the mind of a digital child, rather than just the minds of those who create video games?

    Everything you "accomplished" is exactly as real. You played a video game. I think some people simply are afraid to have that fantasy end. I think that, when we find ourselves attached to a universe, we like to think that the fantasy goes on past the time we've visited it. I think at least part of what makes people deny the carnival is real so vehemently is that we want to think that Guybrush is going to keep going on pirate adventures even when we aren't going to be there to see them. Some people don't want the fantasy to end. I think though, that there's something touching about the idea that we've simply gone into a kid's mind, or even gone with a child into a "real" world of fantasy that mirrors the actual one, and that we spend the entirety of the adventure with this boy through the end.

    And more than that, the idea that it's a curse just doesn't give the ending the proper significance. The problem with "it was all a dream" stories in TV and movies isn't the IDEA of something being false within the world of the fictional body of work. The main issue is that the "dream" is used to "undo" an event, like a character's death. A shocking event that rends the status quo into shreds. The problem is that to take such an event and to render it null and void takes that event's POWER away, they died and we cared for nothing. In the SAME way, the explanation in Curse robs our revelation at the end of LeChuck's Revenge null and void, when it was begging to be a far more important and powerful effect on the nature of the next game.

    To say there is even more to it than meets the eye is interesting, for example Big Woop being the "Voodoo Crossroads" into the Monkey Island universe, where everything is a pirate fantasy, THAT is intriguing and interesting.

    To say that it's just a trick, and that the end of the last game didn't matter, actually blunders RIGHT INTO the problems that make "it was all just a dream" endings so frustrating when it is used in other media.

    @Pale Man said: It's a computergame. It's surreal at times. It's supposed to make you laugh, not psychoanalyze or make something religiously one-street-there-exists-no-other-roads of it. It's a game. We play. For fun. To enjoy. Critic that.


    I think it's fun to talk about a game you love and enjoy. That's why I'm here, I assume that's why you're here.

  • I think it's fun to talk about a game you love and enjoy. That's why I'm here, I assume that's why you're here.

    I'm just in here for the free beer and hot dogs.

  • Monkey Island no es real, es todo un sueño de Antonio Resines
    Monkey Island isn't real, it's all a dream by Antonio Resines (a spanish actor whose succesful TV series, after many seasons, ended this way: he commited suicide and then, suddenly, he wakes up. The whole series -or at least the last few seasons, I don't remember exactly- were a dream)
    That generated a big debate in Spain, and most people disliked the ending

  • @Astro Gnocci said: I'm just in here for the free beer and hot dogs.

    Beer! Who said beer? :D

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