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What does your browser look like?

posted by hansschmucker on - last edited - Viewed by 653 users

Title says it all really:
What does your browser look like and why?
mybrowser.png

The browser is a nightly Firefox trunk build ("Minefield")
The layout is simply done by Showing only the menu bar with small icons.
Elements from left to right: Navigation, Reload, Stop, Menu, Location, Search, Bookmarks, Fullscreen.
The design is the default theme with the "Elegance" persona applied.
The Persona icon in the bottom left corner is the only icon added by extension.
Window design is Windows7 Aero with black and about 50% opacity.
Close button on tabs is moved via browser.tabs.closeButtons:3

P.S. The window is usually quite a bit wider so that the location bar expands.
Installed addons: Adblock+, APNG Edit, Base64 Encoder, Chatzilla, DOM Inspector, Firebug (only enabled when I need it, as it's prone to create conflicts), FlashGot, Full Screen Video, Greasemonkey, LiveHttpHeaders, PasswordExporter, Personas

64 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Thats quite true. Most users would probably be put off by that, infact, alot will. Although sometimes it is for the best for example with those annoying advertising plugins. Unfortunately a lot of people would install those if they were allowed to make a normal decision with it. I complain alot about stupid messages Windows gives off. Like for example when you delete a shortcut, you get an annoying message telling you that it doesn't uninstall the program. Also in the Task Manager, you get messages popping up saying "Are you sure you want to shut this program, it might loose your data, and cause an unstable system" etc. They're stupid and annoying things, but without them, people might not realise those things unfortunately.

  • At least that we can agree on (BTW, you're surfing with an open SSL vulnerability that Microsoft hasn't fixed for half a year, making all encryption useless).

    We could also bring down your bandwidth usage quite a bit if we were allowed to use the more modern standards that everybody except MSIE supports. Heck, getting rid of animated GIFs and replacing them with APNG/lossless-h264 alone would probably reduce your bandwidth bill by 10%. Not having to download 10 different versions of each transparent image because MSIE doesn't handle transparency correctly would probably bring another 10%. And creating most standard effects dynamically (like reflections) instead of downloading prerendered images may even bring in 20%.

    More processing power doesn't mean more data, it means less. You can ask Yare for more details on CPU-vs-filesize :)

  • BTW, if you have Firefox 3.5 installed anyway right now, here are a few little demos I've written that show off what you can do with a modern browser (they're pretty unpolished, but you'll get the idea). They could be faster with a bit of optimization, but they're already lightyears ahead of what you can do in MSIE.

    Music visualization
    Voxel island
    Mario Kart
    3D Model viewer
    Dynamic texturing

  • Updates were made available not long after that "SSL Vulnerability" was found.

    Those are nice demo's but, it makes me wonder, would we really want those in a browser. I mean Music Visualisation can already been done well by media players such as WMP(Yeah, I still use that too along side video plugins, so sue me.) and you can also have a library of your songs in those programs, allowing you to choose what ever song you want to see the visualisation for. All games, like mario kart, work fine in an .exe, so why change it, you'd also be forced to go online if you had games in your browser. As for all of the modeling, the only thing I can see that to be good for would be for game developers wanting to show off their character models or world models or whatever, and I can already see that in screenshots.

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    DjNDB Moderator

    @Rawr said: Those are nice demo's but, it makes me wonder, would we really want those in a browser



    I don't know much about the demos, because i still use firefox 3.0.x until some add ons have been ported and i see a need for change, but part of the Features are HTML5 Elements which could replace proprietary and therefore problematic plugins in some places such as Flash, Real Player and Quicktime.
    That kind of progress is important, because the Web needs standards and not several different approaches for the same thing.
    I am worried when I see the competition between JavaFX, Silverlight and Flash. Just more junk for the Browser to handle. Although I like Java, but that's not the point.

    Who knows what people come up with when the possibilities exists. Just look at AJAX. The technology has been existing for years, and suddenly, several years later, someone comes up with a way of using it that is considered a revolution for web applications.

  • The SSL vulnerability is still open in MSIE8 according to all reports I've found. If you do know otherwise, you may want to amend Microsoft's own report.

    The demos are naturally just that: demos. They're not useful on their own, they just show what the technology is capable of so that when it is needed, people know that it can be done.

  • Oh thats a different one than I was thinking of, since you said since half a year ago, when it would seem it was actually 3months for this one. :P There have been updates recently taking care of other CVE's lately, so they aren't sitting around doing nothing I guess. But meh. Edit: just checked Sun's and other websites site, with their reports on those CVE's and apparently they meaning Firefox only fixed it a couple of days ago.

    @DjNDB, You're right one day someone may find an ingenius way to incorporate those demo's into something revolutionary for webpages, but that day isn't today.

  • @hansschmucker said: BTW, if you have Firefox 3.5 installed anyway right now, here are a few little demos I've written that show off what you can do with a modern browser (they're pretty unpolished, but you'll get the idea). They could be faster with a bit of optimization, but they're already lightyears ahead of what you can do in MSIE.

    Music visualization
    Voxel island
    Mario Kart
    3D Model viewer
    Dynamic texturing



    So, Firefox can do Mode 7 now?

  • Not the way you think :) We'll have to wait for Firefox 4 until we get a true 3D API as the WebGL spec is still in its early stages. The demo you see here actually works quite differently: It uses a displacement map to transform a flat image into a perspective one (or in the case of the pseudo-voxel demo 5 displacement maps). Alternatively, you can use Canvas to implement your own rendering algorithms, but it's difficult to do textures at a similar speed, that's why the 3D model viewer demo (which is implemented via Canvas) only uses flat polygons so far.

    If you want to see the current progress on the GL API, check out http://www.c3dl.org/ . You'll need Vlad's WebGL plugin ( https://people.mozilla.com/~vladimir/canvas3d/ ), which right now is only available for 3.5b4 though

  • @City Of Delusion said: So, Firefox can do Mode 7 now?



    *And* Blast Processing. Consider your mind blown. :p

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