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Morgan Le fay?

posted by Doomduck on - last edited - Viewed by 921 users

Did you guys know that there is a person named Morgan Le Fay..?
http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgan_le_Fay
Morgan Leflay's name is obiously based this person..

Just wondering if this is something that was not known, sorry if this is common knowledge.. Did a quick search but it said "Le" and "fay" were both to short or something so it only searched on "Morgan"

:o:confused:

EDIT: Sorry, didn't realize i linked the Norwegian wiki page xD
There is a link to the english one below..

31 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Asgath said: I suppose its more likely to be known by Europeans and in particular Brits of to whom it is more relevant historically. I say historically in the broadest terms possible of course.
    In anycase, I'm fairly suprised at the number of people who didn't recognise the name.

    Arthurian legends are still pretty much living culture. 19th century romanticism took a lot of influences from the medieval literature and after that fantasy authors continued the tradition, not only in Europe, but also in America.

    I haven't read much Marion Zimmer Bradley, but I have heard that she wrote some books from the perspective of Morgan Le Fay. But personally I can recommend Bernard Cornwell's "The Warlord Chronicles", which tells more "historical" version of Arthurian legend.

  • @GBTW said: So she's Fata Morgana in italian.
    Without the L, of course.
    :)

    And Fata Morgana is also the name of a mirage at sea...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fata_Morgana_%28mirage%29

  • @Jace Taran said: I personally had never heard the name before my class (or perhaps it was Stargate where I heard it first). The name Morgan le Fay is nowhere near as engrained into collective culture as Merlin.

    Really? Morgana (as she is also known as) and Merlin have always seemed to be synonymous with one another to me, since they seemed designed to oppose one another (Morgana was also I believe meant to have studied under Merlin, possibly even literally), and Morgan le Fay is usually the major bad guy to the Round Table. Must be a cultural thing, or maybe I know too much to be objective, though considering that many people don't even know who Churchill was these days I'm not really surprised. :(

    Fun Fact: In the very original version of the Arthurian legends, before there was even a Lancelot created and when Arthur was actually still a capable character Morgana was not a bad guy and was actually a good character who helped him. She was turned into an incestuous half-sister bad guy later with the addition of characters like Lancelot and the weakening of the Arthur character.

  • @Jazzy said: She was turned into an incestuous half-sister bad guy later with the addition of characters like Lancelot and the weakening of the Arthur character.

    In other words, when the French got a hold of the story.

  • @Fronzel said: In other words, when the French got a hold of the story.

    I was trying to avoid being specific, but yes, it would be about that time... ;)

  • Don't be too harsh on us Americans. We have terrible schools, after all. I had to go fairly well out of my way to learn much of Arthurian legend beyond Disney's animated film from the 1960s.

  • When I found out the pirate hunter's name was Morgan leFlay in episode one.... I figured it was probably a woman despite the characters using a male pronoun.

    After all, Morgan LeFay is pretty much the villian in Arthurian Legend (Mordred notwithstanding).

    So when there was all this wonderful speculation between Eps 1 and 2 as in "who is this woman who is holding Guybrush at swordpoint????" I was thinking (but didn't post) that it was probably the pirate hunter Morgan leFlay.... but everyone else seemed convinced it had to be one of the old MI chararacters returning (Kate, Carla) so it was still interesting to see the debate rage on.

  • does this mean that margan le flay is someones half sister? just wondering if they are hinting at something with using this name.

  • (incoming Celtic/Medieval nerd mode)

    Actually, Morgan Le Fay (literally meaning "the fae" or fairy) was based on an earlier Celtic figure by the name of Morrigan. Morrigan, also known as the Washer at The Ford, was a goddess of battle and often appeared in the form of a raven. In The Táin Bó Cúailnge she lands on the shoulder of Cú Chulainn to signify his death. The battle goddess association is quite fitting for a combat focused character such as Morgan Le FLay.

    Also, as already stated, it's not until the French Vulgate cycle and Chetrien de Troyes Arthurian legends (coming much later than the original tales) that Morgan Le Fay becomes a villainous character. Initially, she's an ambiguous figure who, like the Lady of the Lake, sometimes aided Arthur's court. She was altered by the later French myths to provide a foil for Launcelot. The same thing happened to Gawain, who had previously been Arthur's favorite in the court.

  • @mgrant said: Actually (incoming celtic/Medieval nerd mode) Morgan Le Fay (literaly meaning "the fae" or fairy in french) was based on an earlier celtic figure by the name of Morrigan. Morrigan, also known as the Washer at The Ford, was a goddess of battle, often appearing as a raven. In The Táin Bó Cúailnge she lands on the shoulder of Cuchullain to signify his death. The battle goddess association is quite fitting for a combat focused character such as Morgan.

    Also, as already stated, it's not until the later Vulgate cycle and Chetrien de Troyes Arthurian legends (coming much later than the original tales) that Morgan Le Fay becomes a villainous character. Initially, she's an ambiguous figure who, like the Lady of the Lake, sometimes aided Arthur's court. She was altered by the later French myths to provide a foil for Launcelot.

    this still doesnt mean they wouldnt have been hinting at something.

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