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Glitch in ToMI

posted by angel7psyche on - last edited - Viewed by 171 users

I downloaded the 1st Chapter in Tales of Monkey Island, and it seemed to work ok until I picked up the Voodoo Ingredient list which just comes up as a big black spot on the screen. And then when I go to the inventory, it's all black, but I can tell something is there because when I run the cursor over it, the X turns green. Is there any way to fix this?

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    DjNDB Moderator

    @Bubble said: I'm seeing the same "black inventory" issue with The Launch of the Screaming Narwhal. My card is indeed a bit old (GeForce4 Ti 4800 SE), though it supports Directx 8.1:

    http://www.gpureview.com/geforce4-ti4800se-card-139.html

    I've attached the output of dxdiag. Can you figure out my issue, will I have to upgrade my hardware?

    I fear it's one of those cards that don't work properly although they should support DirectX 8.1. You can see more examples here.

    What kind of graphics card slot do you have?

  • What do you mean what kind of slot? Like PCI or AGP?
    I think it's AGP, how could I check it?

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    DjNDB Moderator

    @Bubble said: What do you mean what kind of slot? Like PCI or AGP?
    I think it's AGP, how could I check it?

    Yes, PCI or AGP. Also there are different AGP Versions.

    Your Mainboard Manual would be the best source of information.

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    DjNDB Moderator

    @Bubble said: What do you mean what kind of slot? Like PCI or AGP?
    I think it's AGP, how could I check it?

    In case you don't know the manufacturer and model we can try to identify your Mainboard this way:

    Identifying your mainboard:

    Download and install the latest version of cpu-z.
    Start it and open the mainboard tab like this:
    b488c_1248592576.png

    Write a message containing
    Motherboard
    Manufacturer:
    Model:
    Chipset:
    BIOS
    Brand:
    Version:
    Date:

  • Motherboard
    Manufacturer: (CPU-Z left this empty, but I'm pretty sure it's Soyo)
    Model: VT8367-8233A
    Chipset: VIA KT266/333 Rev. 00
    Southbridge: VIA VT8233A
    LPCIO: ITE IT8705

    BIOS
    Brand: Phoenix Technologies, LTD
    Version: 6.00 PG
    Date: 01/24/2003

    Also, under Graphic Interface:
    Version: AGP version 3.0
    Transfer rate: 4x
    Max supported: 4x
    Site Band: enabled

  • User Avatar Image
    DjNDB Moderator

    @Bubble said:
    Also, under Graphic Interface:
    Version: AGP version 3.0
    Transfer rate: 4x
    Max supported: 4x
    Site Band: enabled

    Thank you.
    Sadly I don't know how reliable that information is. The only safe way would be to get someone to look at your hardware and pick a suitable graphics card.
    I don't feel comfortable with giving you advice on something that might break your system.

    It is however likely that a modern AGP 8x card will work. In some cases you will need to have a 6 pin power connector for it too.

  • I'll probably replace the entire computer, it's 7 years old already.
    But I'm curious: how come an adventure game requires so much graphics power? Does using advanced DirectX stuff significantly reduce the cost of development? Does it create incredible FX that would be too hard to do otherwise?

  • User Avatar Image
    DjNDB Moderator

    @Bubble said: I'll probably replace the entire computer, it's 7 years old already.
    But I'm curious: how come an adventure game requires so much graphics power? Does using advanced DirectX stuff significantly reduce the cost of development? Does it create incredible FX that would be too hard to do otherwise?

    That's the another option.

    It doesn't require much graphics power. If it is turned down to quality 1 even poor cards can handle it. There are always exceptions such as some low cost and integrated graphics solutions.

    Higher graphics levels allow better looking graphics for those with more powerful graphics cards.

    I don't know much about DirectX developing but I think DirectX 8 brings desirable programming features. Look at DirectX 8 in the Direct3D History.

    Direct3D was not considered to be user friendly, but as of DirectX version 8.1, many usability problems were resolved. Direct3D 8 contained many powerful 3D graphics features, such as vertex shaders, pixel shaders, fog, bump mapping and texture mapping.

    A programming API that is easier to use is a very good reason, besides the nice new features, from a developers point of view.
    Further DirectX 8.1 is ~7 years old itself. I think that's a good compromise between supporting old hardware and development requirements.

  • @DjNDB said: That's the another option.

    It doesn't require much graphics power. If it is turned down to quality 1 even poor cards can handle it. There are always exceptions such as some low cost and integrated graphics solutions.

    Higher graphics levels allow better looking graphics for those with more powerful graphics cards.

    I don't know much about DirectX developing but I think DirectX 8 brings desirable programming features. Look at DirectX 8 in the Direct3D History.

    A programming API that is easier to use is a very good reason, besides the nice new features, from a developers point of view.
    Further DirectX 8.1 is ~7 years old itself. I think that's a good compromise between supporting old hardware and development requirements.

    You're right, that's not much graphics power... I must remember we're past the VGA era :)

  • And really when the original monkey island came out, if you had tried to play it on a computer that was seven years old at the time, it probably wouldn't have worked either! I actually just replaced my 7 year old computer too though, so I totally feel your pain.

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