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Spelling Errours

posted by Iron Curtain on - last edited - Viewed by 412 users

I haven't completed the Bogey Man yet, but I can tell the orthography is mostly Webster's American and not The Queen's British. This is a problem.

Here are some examples:[list]
[*]A street sign saying "Town Center" instead of "Town Centre"
[*]Miss Prudence Flitt saying "Organizations" instead of "Organisations"
[*]Miss Prudence Flitt saying "Squalor" instead of "Squalour"[/list]
I'm just saying, to immerse myself in the "Britishness" of the Wallace & Gromit license, I think the English orthography should be British rather than American (even though my personal preference is American).

46 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @freeboprich said: When we say Americans don't get irony and you people insist that you do, I get a nice warm feeling and a wry grin when I see reactions like this. Sorry, but you walked right into that one. :)



    Ahem, see my previous point... honestly, I've got nothing against cultural variations, as for instance I've known very witty and madcap Germans which totally belies my country's own stereotype. I can therefore take that comment in the (wow) ironic tone I will assume it was presented in.



    It's "of," not "have," show us up.

    Grammar police - Stay in.


    Fixed

  • I think use 'trash' to refer to a bin in the first episode too...

    Though, really, I reckon if I've enough time to care, I've got waay too much unused time :)

    For my money, TellTale have done a fantastic job including regional (North England) colloquialisms. Definitly one of the best licensed games I've ever played.

  • As my good friend Homer would say: "English? Who needs that? I'm never going to England!"

  • @Eagle said: As my good friend Homer would say: "English? Who needs that? I'm never going to England!"


    And look where that got him. Sat drinking an' eating on the couch all day. :p

  • @Rawr said: And look where that got him. Sat drinking an' eating on the couch all day. :p



    Sounds like a win-win to me :D

    OT: I am decidedly unperturbed (sp?) by the americanisation of the English language, in fact I find it preferrable to the degredation of English language coming from excessive use of the internet. lol.

  • That's quite true. Although I don't mind acronyms like lol, text speak annoys the hell out of me, much more than American English. On text messages(Hence the name, text speak) it's understandable because the keys on that are horrible to use, that said I still find myself typing out the full words, instead of text speak. On the internet I just find it plain annoying though. It only takes about 1 second extra to type out the full word, so I honestly don't see the need to use text speak. Not to mention it's nearly impossible to read sometimes.

  • @freeboprich said: When we say Americans don't get irony and you people insist that you do, I get a nice warm feeling and a wry grin when I see reactions like this. Sorry, but you walked right into that one. :)



    No, we understand irony. You're just really bad at it. ;)

    (also the internet is really bad at conveying irony)

    Edit: Also, you have to set it up like a joke, and provide context. The way that poster said it sounded like he had mental deficiencies moreso than a joke. I mean, he sounded serious.

    Sorry, I'm grumpy because I'm sick after going to PAX. I hear that you have to lick a pig's behind to get treatment for my sickness, is that true?

  • @Pale Man said: I'm more concerned with them spelling words correctly for ANY English dialect, since they always seem to have like 50 spelling errors in the subtitles.



    I agree with this guy! He's awesome and the smartest person on earth and is never wrong!

  • @freeboprich said:
    It's "have," not "of," don't show us up.

    Grammar police - out.



    I think he got it right the first time when he said:
    "I couldn't have said it better myself".

    I'm pretty sure that the word 'of', doesn't belong in that sentence...but I'm not a grammar expert.

  • Their am also an some grammatical mistake? Them Telltale peoples knead too right more slower,

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