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Thank God LucasArts canceled Sam & Max: Freelance Police

posted by Smollie on - last edited - Viewed by 1.1K users

Yep, I'm glad they did! For now I can look forward to a lot more Sam & Max adventures on a regular basis in the future, thanks to the wonderful people at TellTale!
For had LucasArts released Sam & Max: Freelance Police, that would probably have been the only game with S&M content for years to come.
True, it would have been fun, but only for a short period of time.

Now, instead, Sam & Max are coming to me on a regular basis, to satiate my need for cartoony mayhem and critical outlook on the world!
No, I wouldn't want to have it any other way!!!

69 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Since they otherwise wouldn't have made any money off this franchise, I'm sure they're jumping for joy at their good fortune. :D Um... Maybe they could buy F.P. and mesh it with Season 2 or something. :confused:

  • Well i for one am not and will never be happy with episodic. Still makes limitations to how complex and how many location and items there can be.

    I also enjoy a big game where i got it all so i can set my own pace. I sure dont hope this is becoming a trend. The old facasion way is better, can only hope that after this season tellgames will make 1 big season 2.

  • @RMJ1984 said: Well i for one am not and will never be happy with episodic. Still makes limitations to how complex and how many location and items there can be.



    I dont see why episodic gaming has to have these limitations you mention. Episodes could simply be in the form of a patch that adds more locations onto a map (HTR style), allowing the gamer to return to previous locations.

  • It's funny, I played Full Throttle for the first time last week, it's held up as a fairly short but definite classic adventure.

    What amused me was how often you'd move forward to a new set of locations and be unable to return back to earlier locales - and more often than not often the transitions were accompanied by a major loss of inventory.

    This so-called limitation of Episodic Adventures has been in many, many previous classics (Grim Fandango too, with 4 distinct chapters).

    (Some) people seem to be forgetting that this approach (limited backtracking to earlier locations and periodic loss of now-useless inventory) is actually pretty common among full length adventure games too.

  • I would never use the words "thank god" and "lucasarts cancelled Sam & Max: Freelance Police" in the same sentence :o

  • I would have loved to see Freelance Police finished. But if Telltale bought it, they would have to remake it. But if they had done that, well, I would've bought it. Why shouldn't it have been just as good as these episodes? Many of the people who worked on the LucasArts-game is the ones who made these episodes. I'm still angry with LucasArts for cancelling it. And probably will continue to be. I don't want another adventure game from LucasArts, since they've spit on the genre with their decition. Well, my opinion anyway. But by seeing old trailers... Man, Max was ugly!

    I love the new Sam & Max-episodes, but can't stop feeling that the episodic approach limits the experience. Or no, it doesn't limit the experience, the experience is great as it is, but it limits the number of different ways of creating an experience. To be honest, I think that the adventure game-title don't really fits the episodic approach. It doesn't feel like an adventure. "Adventure" has a more epic feel to it. In Sam & Max, a trip all around the USA has been reduced to walking around the neighbourhood and visiting some strange location. And there's nothing wrong with that, it just don't feel like an adventure. I love the adventure-feel in games, so I definitely prefer full adventures over self contained episodes.

    Episodes with the scale of part 2 in CMI or year 2 in Grim Fandango would've been great. But you know, even if these parts are self contained in a way, they are just pieces of one large story. And even if that's the case in Season 1 too, the episodes are made to be a story in itself. The focus isn't on the surrounding story, the focus is on the single cases in each episode. And that's a huge difference. Like a friends-episode compared to Lost, where you're much more dependent on the previous episodes to understand anything. That's the curse of episodic adventure-games for my part. You have to make it totally understandable for everyone who hasn't played the previous episodes in the season.

    Ooh, Meché

  • @Rapp Scallion said:
    I love the new Sam & Max-episodes, but can't stop feeling that the episodic approach limits the experience. Or no, it doesn't limit the experience, the experience is great as it is, but it limits the number of different ways of creating an experience. To be honest, I think that the adventure game-title don't really fits the episodic approach. It doesn't feel like an adventure. "Adventure" has a more epic feel to it. In Sam & Max, a trip all around the USA has been reduced to walking around the neighbourhood and visiting some strange location. And there's nothing wrong with that, it just don't feel like an adventure. I love the adventure-feel in games, so I definitely prefer full adventures over self contained episodes.

    Episodes with the scale of part 2 in CMI or year 2 in Grim Fandango would've been great. But you know, even if these parts are self contained in a way, they are just pieces of one large story. And even if that's the case in Season 1 too, the episodes are made to be a story in itself. The focus isn't on the surrounding story, the focus is on the single cases in each episode. And that's a huge difference. Like a friends-episode compared to Lost, where you're much more dependent on the previous episodes to understand anything. That's the curse of episodic adventure-games for my part. You have to make it totally understandable for everyone who hasn't played the previous episodes in the season.

    Ooh, Meché



    Regarding the idea of short, standalone, more-or-less independent episodes, I don't think that's necessarily a curse of episodic adventure games--it's just that Telltale believed that Sam and Max (with their history of standalone comic books and TV episodes) would fit well into the mold of a more sitcom-like standalone/independent model. The Bone episodes, for example, definitely feel more like a serial TV show like 24 or Lost, and though I haven't played it yet (maybe never), Myst Online: Uru Live, while episodic (they've added 1 new Myst age per month since starting up) also depends on the player having played the previous episodic deliveries before taking a crack at or understanding the story in the new Age (I might be wrong about this). And with the newly announced Dreamfall Chapters, Ragnar Tornquist has hinted that "Funcom will do to the serialized drama what Telltale did to the standalone sitcom in regards to episodic format."

  • @Rapp Scallion said: In Sam & Max, a trip all around the USA has been reduced to walking around the neighbourhood and visiting some strange location. And there's nothing wrong with that, it just don't feel like an adventure.



    Did you play (and like) Day of the Tentacle?

  • @Hero1 said: I would never use the words "thank god" and "lucasarts cancelled Sam & Max: Freelance Police" in the same sentence :o



    OK, how about "Thank Cthulhu LucasArts cancelled Sam & Max: Freelance Police"?

    It's a shame that the company that once gave birth to the classic adventure games of yore seems to be turning its back on the genre so blatantly.
    Especially if you consider that they are probably making more than enough money on the Star Wars games to run the risk of making not so many $$$ with new adventure games.

    I doesn't make me hate the company, for I enjoy their non-adventure games a lot, but I do hope they will come to their senses in the near future and maybe hire TellTale to co-develop more adventures?

    And let us not forget that LucasArts is not the only company to abandon the adventure genre. Sierra pretty much did the same!
    I miss Roger Wilco!

  • @Smollie said: And let us not forget that LucasArts is not the only company to abandon the adventure genre. Sierra pretty much did the same!
    I miss Roger Wilco!



    At least Sierra allows them to be... available, through Gametap and rereleases as collections. Lucasarts seems to be forcing their old games into obscurity.

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