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LeChuck's Ship Scene - "Unbalanced Drama"?

posted by Mermaid on - last edited - Viewed by 591 users

Okay, since I saw that concept art of LeChuck's ship I couldn't wait to get to that part of the game and was AMAZED when I saw how great it turned out - the colors, the lighting - awesome. It set up an atmosphere that I last saw in LeChuck's Revenge, fearsome, powerful, dramatic.

So I was all in the mood and expecting some dark, dramatic evil scene there which actually did follow, but one thing I really found irritating was the dialogue between Guybrush, LeChuck and Elaine which, in my opinion, just didn't fit in there at many moments.

That whole Elaine turning into a demon scene is a shocker, even more so when she grabs that root beer bottle and sprays it at Guybrush (Dominic, again, doing a great job voice acting all that emotion into him).
So up to this point, there's nothing really to complain about, except maybe that I still found Earl's voice to be missing that punch he used to have for LeChuck's voice (different subject).

The scene in which Guybrush reappears as a Zombie though is where acting / dialogue get "unbalanced" concerning the drama of the moment:

LeChuck starts acting extremely cruel, weakening Guybrush with every punch, leaving him hardly enough strength to keep himself on his feet, let alone walk. While I kinda liked the brave comebacks Guybrush has at LeChuck, after a while I found them, say, unrealistic. We've never seen Guybrush in such a fragile, pitiful and suffering state, it just didn't match with his responses to LeChuck.

The bigger problem I had was the acting / dialogue between LeChuck and Elaine, though. To start off with, it seems that by now, LeChuck's lost all of his certain "evil, but yet gentleman" qualities. Which is: he's come down to hitting and killing women.

After Elaine leaves her demonic state and comes back to normal, she's literally battered to the ground by LeChuck (okay: after she's tried to kill him, but still). That doesn't quite go along with his deep love for her that drove him to win her heart in all those years, does it? Worse: some seconds later, he tells Guybrush that "Elaine's to be mine...to do the sewing and keep the house clean in case we have guests." Uh...no. Totally unfitting here.

Also the "Plunderbunny" / "Honey Pumpkin" dialogue between Guybrush and Elaine, which I actually find amusing most of the time, didn't really work here I think. There were a couple of more examples which I don't remember right now, though.

Don't get me wrong: There's a reason Monkey Island has been done and kept in a cartoonish style and the last thing I'd want to miss about this series is the humour that prevents the story from becoming all TOO dark. (Even I missed Murray in the finale!) But I kinda didn't like the combination of both, humour and evil, in that finale scene.
After all, there was no humour in Morgan's death scene, for instance, either, which is actually why it was appreciated so much.

Anyone feeling similar about this?

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  • Not really.

    Guybrush's attempts at humor and cracking jokes in the face of even the most intense danger is just part of his character. He was trying and failing at this point because he was so badly beaten up.

    LeChuck beating Elaine to the ground, well, she stabbed him, so what do you expect? LeChuck is hardly a gentleman, he's impatient and a brute. Sure he wants Elaine for himself but its not like at this point he's going to take being stabbed lying down, he wants Elaine even if he has to force her love. He beat Morgan down too and even killed her. (big problem with this as De singe should have been the one to kill Morgan but whatever)

    The plunderbunny dialogue WAS a bit worn out, but Elaine and Guybrush were actually terrified and fighting for their lives this time so uh, well not much to say on that one.

  • @Mermaid said:
    LeChuck starts acting extremely cruel, weakening Guybrush with every punch, leaving him hardly enough strength to keep himself on his feet, let alone walk. While I kinda liked the brave comebacks Guybrush has at LeChuck, after a while I found them, say, unrealistic. We've never seen Guybrush in such a fragile, pitiful and suffering state, it just didn't match with his responses to LeChuck.


    I think Dominic pulled it off extremely well. Guybrush is determined, no matter how much he gets battered. If he didn't have any fight in him, he wouldn't have the initiative to perform the actions necessary to finish him Once And For All™, again. I don't know what you want here. Guybrush should give up?

    The bigger problem I had was the acting / dialogue between LeChuck and Elaine, though. To start off with, it seems that by now, LeChuck's lost all of his certain "evil, but yet gentleman" qualities. Which is: he's come down to hitting and killing women.


    Here's where I blame Curse. And hate Curse. And want every copy of Curse to be tracked down and smashed with a sledgehammer. LeChuck isn't SUPPOSED to be the relative teddy bear he is in that game. He's supposed to be feared, powerful, evil, brutal. Any "gentleman" quality is a taint on the original character that should be gladly thrown out.

    After Elaine leaves her demonic state and comes back to normal, she's literally battered to the ground by LeChuck (okay: after she's tried to kill him, but still). That doesn't quite go along with his deep love for her that drove him to win her heart in all those years, does it? Worse: some seconds later, he tells Guybrush that "Elaine's to be mine...to do the sewing and keep the house clean in case we have guests." Uh...no. Totally unfitting here.


    Not really. LeChuck didn't really "love" Elaine. Generally, you don't kidnap the ones you love, or try to force them into marriage ceremonies. LeChuck wants to BE loved, sure. But he doesn't love. I don't think he knows how to.

    Also the "Plunderbunny" / "Honey Pumpkin" dialogue between Guybrush and Elaine, which I actually find amusing most of the time, didn't really work here I think. There were a couple of more examples which I don't remember right now, though.


    I could have done without it, but I don't think it hurt the overall integrity of the scene at all. The two love each other, they spend a good 90% of their time together on crazy pirate adventures, unless it's Guybrush's birthday.

    Anyone feeling similar about this?


    Nope!

  • Personally, for me, the combination of dark/humor (AND even... you know... brutality) is what made the ending just epic. And though similiar to MI2 boss battle in a way, much better.

    Guybrush wants to BE loved, sure. But he doesn't love. I don't think he knows how to.

    Did you want to say "LeChuck"?

  • @Farlander said: Personally, for me, the combination of dark/humor (AND even... you know... brutalism) is what made the ending just epic.


    Did you want to say "brutality"?

  • I just enjoyed ... my brains out. Or something. Found the weird Plunderbunny shout outs very funny! And there were so many, not just 2 or 3 lines being recycled! Wow, enjoyed it immensely!

    (and don't forgot to keep watching AFTER the credits!)

  • Did you want to say "brutality"?

    Touché. :D

  • @Rather Dashing said: Did you want to say "brutality"?

    Perhaps he was referring to the architectural movement?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brutalist_architecture

    Anyway, I thought the entire sequence was done extremely well. This was easily my favorite final boss fight with LeChuck since Monkey Island 2.

  • Elaine's moodshift still irks me. I don't buy it. Not at least with the whole "It's my masterplan ho ho ho" thing at the end. Yeah, masterplan calls for being in control more than 70% of the time, lady. Otherwise it's called improvising, going with the flow, sheer dumb luck.

  • @Byakko said: Elaine's moodshift still irks me. I don't buy it. Not at least with the whole "It's my masterplan ho ho ho" thing at the end. Yeah, masterplan calls for being in control more than 70% of the time, lady. Otherwise it's called improvising, going with the flow, sheer dumb luck.

    I just don't understand how she knew about the ring. That's pretty much as far as her "plan" goes. She does sort of make it up as she goes along, doesn't she?

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