User Avatar Image

Tales of Monkey Island running on Windows 7

posted by Dyne on - last edited - Viewed by 643 users

Hello,

I have a new iMac 24'inch with the following specs:

Processor: 2.66 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo; 6MB shared L2 cache

Memory: 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3

NVIDIA GeForce 9400M graphics processor with 256MB of DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory.

Naturally, games aren't too friendly with the Mac operating system, so an alternative such as Windows is required for a larger selection of games to play.

For those that don't know, Mac's have a program called "Bootcamp," which allows the harddrive to be split into a separate partition to install and run Windows. Not being a huge fan of Windows, but wanting to play the new Monkey Island, I decided to install the free Windows 7 Release Candidate 32-Bit version. I was told that the 32-bit version was recommended over the 64-bit version.

Once Windows 7 was installed, I downloaded Tales of Monkey Island and booted it up. It opened up in the incorrect resolution for my screen, so I did some tweaking to get it in full-screen mode. Once the resolution was set I started a new file and was met with a very laggy experience with a choppy framerate. To get the game to run smoothly I needed to change the quality to "1".

Considering that my system passes the requirements to run this game, I'm confused as to why I can only run this game smoothly on the lowest quality setting. Is it something to do with Windows 7? Is there any known problems about this game running slowly?

Does anyone have any solutions?

Thanks.

27 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I have an iMac (this one, with 256MB of VRAM + upgraded to 3GB main RAM), and it dual boots with Windows XP Home Edition, and it runs ToMI fine. It just doesn't run it at the maximum level (and then again, maybe it shouldn't).

  • [quote]Why do people buy crappy, non-upgradeable Apple products again?[/quote]

    Because people like OS X, and can have the option of choosing windows? I know you could install OS X illegally, but that doesn't count. Besides, Apple tried licensing their OS a while ago, and it turned out their OS became more manageable and less buggy under their control, hence the non-upgradability.

    True, I hate the non-upgradability, but given a choice between upgradability and ease of use, I'd choose ease of use.

  • Thanks for all the help so far guys, much appreciated.

    @accolon said: Did you try to install the Bootcamp drivers? Try to download the most recent graphics driver from the nVidia website.

    Or you could take your XP disc and integrate SP2 (very easy to do with a tool called nLite, use Google to find it). XP is fully supported by Bootcamp.


    I installed the drivers from the Mac OSX disc and they installed correctly. I also downloaded updated drivers from nVidia's site, although I think there is a compatibility issue with Windows 7. I got the following message:

    "This is a response from a pre-release version of Windows 7. If you have feedback about this response, please use the survey at the bottom of the page.

    Compatibility issue between a chipset in your computer and Windows

    This problem was caused by a compatibility issue between this version of Windows and a chipset in your computer. The chipset was created by NVIDIA Corporation.

    The model name of the chipset is NVIDIA nForce."

    Not too sure what to make of that, but I did try to follow the steps provided but nothing happend.

    Oh, and thanks for the info on nLite, I might try it out.

    If the game running slowly has nothing to do with Windows 7, then would it be recommended to try out the 64-bit version instead of the 32-bit version? Apparently 64-bit uses your ram more effectively, but has less compatibility than 32-bit. If anyone could explain the two more in depth, I would be much obliged.

    Here is a picture of my specs in depth, and according to Microsoft, I pass the recommended requirements to run Tales of Monkey Island.
    Desktop.png

    The reason I purchased the cheaper option of the available iMac's was because I'm not a huge fan of having to update your hardware just so you can play the latest games. And considering that "Cloud Gaming" is supposedly coming later this year, and supposedly 100% compatible with MacOSX I figured that I wouldn't need to spend more money on better hardware if Cloud Gaming will work on any machine that can stream video. For more information, search "OnLive" and "GaiKai" in google.

    Again, thanks everyone.

  • As a "cloud gamer" from the past, I can tell you that Cloud game isn't everything it's said to be. The PS3/PSP crowd had it for a few years now and the lag that you always have keeps you from playing any type of action game.

    About Win7: At Q5 I get perfect framerate and at Q9 it's still acceptable with a GeForce GO 7950 with WQ index of 4.6 (5.9/5.2 for graphics)

  • @hansschmucker said: As a "cloud gamer" from the past, I can tell you that Cloud game isn't everything it's said to be. The PS3/PSP crowd had it for a few years now and the lag that you always have keeps you from playing any type of action game.


    Really? I thought the technology was still in the testing phases. I know there are rumors of "Cloud Technology" hitting the PS3. I remember hearing that Sony recently registed a trademark titled "Playstation Cloud" or something along those lines.

    I've still got my skepticism on the technology, but the demonstration videos seam to work very well.

  • @Dyne said: Really? I thought the technology was still in the testing phases. I know there are rumors of "Cloud Technology" hitting the PS3. I remember hearing that Sony recently registed a trademark titled "Playstation Cloud" or something along those lines.

    I've still got my skepticism on the technology, but the demonstration videos seam to work very well.

    Sorry, didn't think about a non-Sony gamer not being familiar with RemotePlay. The PS3 can be used as what usually be the provider and stream games to the PSP that way. It's not actually called cloud-gaming and the infrastructure is a little different since you control the host as well, but from a purely technical POV it's the same: Server hosts game, client sends input from client to server, server sends result back. This happens via a standard internet or a direct Wifi connection

  • @smashing said: Is Tales any simpler than Doom 3 (a few year old game)? I doubt so.

    I think players really need to shake off the mentality that adventure games will be forever compatible with slow machines. That is just not the case these days!

    Maybe TOMI is not simpler than Doom 3, but the graphics are far from being as complex as in many other current games. All I wanted to say is that the 9400M is not as bad as some people said in this thread. If it can run Doom 3 at 80 fps, it should be able to run TOMI without major problems.

    Like I said, I put TOMI onto an old laptop with Intel GMA X3100 (and a Celeron 1,7 GHz), and it runs fine on quality setting 3. The 9400M is far more powerful (about 5 times faster than the GMA), so do your math.

    Whatever the problem is, it's not the graphics chip in this case.

  • Apple version of TOMI is now AVAILABLE!!! Just go to telltale site!

  • @Leak said: Why do people buy crappy, non-upgradeable Apple products again?

    agreed.

    @Leak said:
    True, I hate the non-upgradability, but given a choice between upgradability and ease of use, I'd choose ease of use.

    ahem... watch this video, plz. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz5Fc8k4M50

  • @Chyron8472 said: agreed.

    ahem... watch this video, plz. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz5Fc8k4M50

    That guy reminds me of my maths teacher...

Add Comment