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Best Telltale Season?

posted by plrichard on - last edited - Viewed by 333 users

Ok, it's pretty obvious what this poll is about so please answer.

Thanks.

Also...long time no see Telltale!!

22 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @haydenwce27 said: Tales was the most well-made. The whole thing was very cinematic, it was almost like playing an animated movie.

    This. Tales felt like a perfection of the episodic gaming style. I really can't imagine the story being presented in any other way.
    The blending of story and gameplay puts TOMI heads and shoulders above the others. They're all great, but I don't get any emotional impact from Sam and Max or Strong Bad.

  • @LowMoralFiber said: This. Tales felt like a perfection of the episodic gaming style. I really can't imagine the story being presented in any other way.
    The blending of story and gameplay puts TOMI heads and shoulders above the others. They're all great, but I don't get any emotional impact from Sam and Max or Strong Bad.

    Who plays Sam and Max or Strong Bad for emotional impact? :p

  • @Secret Fawful said: Who plays Sam and Max or Strong Bad for emotional impact? :p

    I play ALL videogames for emotional impact! Especially Tetris!

    Poor, poor clockwise L block... He just never fit in with the others... :(

  • Tales of Monkey Island is the most recent, so it’s also the one with the best quality (because Telltale’s always improving their skills and their engine). However, I voted for Sam&Max Season Two (beyond time and space) because… well… someone said birthday ?

  • @Kroms said: (the most obvious "I don't understand how this relates to the plot at all" bit being Nipperkin's)

    Ok, I get where you are going with that but that goes with the plor for 104, plus you would never had gotten the screaming narwhal/winslow without him(of course Guybrush probably would have gotten the ship to escape anyway) In 104, 3 of the crimes involved his the tasks he did for Nipperkin(Doro's crime from the treasure hunting task, the cat one and the nacho scar came from the bar fight) so that is where they came from in the story plus, longer episode:D

    @Kroms said: I play ALL videogames for emotional impact! Especially Tetris!

    Poor, poor clockwise L block... He just never fit in with the others... :(

    lol:D

  • Beyond Space & Tine is King-ding-a-ling in my book. The difference in quality between it and Season One was I thought a real jump. The dialogue flowed well, the puzzles seemed more at home and the story was really really good. Hands down my favourite Sam & max games...so far

  • @haydenwce27 said: Tales was the most well-made. The whole thing was very cinematic, it was almost like playing an animated movie.

    I feel the same, but I didn't like that, actually. Now, I'm all wow! and stuff, but I felt it was too much like a movie. It didn't feel as much like a game as a result.
    I can easily see it as a movie. Remove the whole parts where you have to choose a dialogue option, or the inventory, possibly add a few things to show GB combining items or something, and you have a movie (or rather, movies. Each chapter would easily make a movie. Or an episode in a show).

    I totally understand the appeal of that but I guess I'm old school and want my games to feel like games and my movies like movies. Movies are passive and games are active, and by making it more like a movie I felt it made me more passive and submissive (no innuendo intended) and I didn't like that. It just didn't feel the same. It was more, as you said, a movie that happened to be interactive than a game that happened to be cinematic. That was the way I felt at least.

  • @avistew said: I feel the same, but I didn't like that, actually. Now, I'm all wow! and stuff, but I felt it was too much like a movie. It didn't feel as much like a game as a result.
    I can easily see it as a movie. Remove the whole parts where you have to choose a dialogue option, or the inventory, possibly add a few things to show GB combining items or something, and you have a movie (or rather, movies. Each chapter would easily make a movie. Or an episode in a show).

    I totally understand the appeal of that but I guess I'm old school and want my games to feel like games and my movies like movies. Movies are passive and games are active, and by making it more like a movie I felt it made me more passive and submissive (no innuendo intended) and I didn't like that. It just didn't feel the same. It was more, as you said, a movie that happened to be interactive than a game that happened to be cinematic. That was the way I felt at least.

    I have to disagree with you. Seeing one of my most favorite characters in a movie has given me a really great feeling, and being able to control this movie just added to it. I don't really think there should be a borderline between games and movies that's just put there to remind all of us that they are entirely seperate things (they're not). For this really satisfying storyline Tales has, I think it was the best thing to do. And I'm really eager to see the new Sam and Max game which is said to have a similar feel with Tales.

  • I totally understand how you can disagree with me. I realise my vision is a minority thing and most people feel more like you.

    I think games and movies are in opposition though. One is active and one is passive, by definition. Adventure games are about it being you doing things. It's not "Guybrush did this" it's "I did this". When it's a movie, it's not "I did this" anymore, not as strongly. It's at least the way I felt.

    Now that I've finished playing it once, I actually don't see myself replaying it anytime soon. However, I've been watching walkthrough, or extracting the sounds to listen to some of the lines. I'm even making some kind of "radio play" version with just sound to load on my mp3 player to listen to. Now you might think it means I really loved the game, but the way I see it is I love the movie.

    I don't want to go back and use items on things a second time. Instead, I want to watch to the part where Guybrush says that and so and so answer that.
    To me, it feels much different. Games I like I play over and over and over again and would never consider watching a walkthrough of them because I take my enjoyment from playing them. Tales, well, I could see myself never playing it again, ever. Why play it when I can do better: watch it, and by doing that skip the boring parts?

    If Sam and Max 3 is indeed similar to Tales, I have no doubt that I will enjoy it immensely, but it's quite possible that I will play it only once period, and then watch it.

    You might feel that the two can be merged without a problem, but I just feel differently. To me they're as different as writing a novel versus reading a novel. I enjoy both, but they're not the same.

  • I have to agree with Avistew here. The increased focus on merging video games with movies (and even vice-versa) is really beginning to bug me. Video games are all about immersion. Movies are about being along for the ride.

    Lately, though, it seems like people think that they should switch. Don't get me wrong, I loved Tales. I thought it was great. It seems as though people are trying to make their games "cinematic" and with that comes these new dynamic characters, which are sometimes great. The more complicated and dynamic a character is, though, it makes it harder to relate. It's much easier to "feel" like you're Master Chief than it is to feel like you're Guybrush. Not even due to the first person angle, but because the Chief is quiet and doesn't say much. Guybrush says what he wants to and is a great character, but he doesn't feel representative of ME anymore. I am occasionally given an option of what to say, but even that is sometimes taken away with Guybrush saying something different, letting me know that he is his own character. In the older games when Guybrush showed less emotion it was easier to put yourself inside the character's head. I really enjoyed what Telltale did with the season, so don't take it as I don't, I'm just using it as an example to show the trend in games that is bugging me right now.

    It's even happening the other way in movies. Movies like Avatar and the rising trend of making 3D movies where the film-maker tries to put you into their world are good examples. I just don't understand this. Did I feel like I was on Pandora? Sometimes. Did I feel "immersed" and important? Of course not. These events would have happened whether I was there or not. No one was there talking to me. So, I guess I just wanted to say that I don't understand these new trends. Video games have the tools to be immersive and movies have the tools to be, as Avistew said, passive and being along for the ride. To me it just makes sense to use the best tools for what the creator wants to do.

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