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Happy Easter!!

posted by Silverwolfpet on - last edited - Viewed by 275 users

May everybody here receive Light in their souls and be happy! :D

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  • i havnt been able to eat ym chocolat cos i had a stomack ake all day T_T

  • @avistew said: They also picked up quinoa while they were there. For Easter they gave us a box of various beans + quinoa and the biggest couscous I've ever seen. Can't wait to try it.

    I love giant couscous!

  • I love any holiday my family celebrates(this is included) because I get something(on Friday the 13th I got the flu:D). This year i got $5(compared to my $200 birthday) and a nice choclolate rabbit(if it was of max I would have laughed because exactly 3 people besides me even knows they exist) I also had fun at my familys annual easter egg hunt(yes im too old but I had nothing to do).
    Yeah not the worlds best easter but it was nice. :)

  • I always wondered how this celebration is celebrated in places which is actually spring. Here's beginning the fall.

    In Latin America (Or at least in Chile) is mostly celebrated as Jesus' resurrection, it's called "Semana Santa" which can be translated as "Holy Week"; In Friday we have the tradition of not eat meat or not go to parties that day (But eat Fish instead) and give Chocolate Eggs or Rabbits to the kids on Sunday technically because Jesus resurrected. Or at least that my folks told me. At the end, is just North American culture invasion (But there's the theory is was fault of the German immigrants which comes at the beginning of the last century (With a second wave in the 2nd World War) in an effort to help to colonize the south of the country).

  • @GinnyN said: In Friday we have the tradition of not eat meat

    That's the tradition for every single Friday ever in France. Mostly if you're Catholic, but even public places such as schools won't serve red meat on Fridays, only seafood.

    I couldn't tell you how Easter is celebrated in France though as I've never celebrated it. There tends to be chocolate for sale (hens, bells, eggs) and sugar angels are common around then (that's candy), but I guess the religious celebration is different. I only know about lent (you give up something, usually meat, for 40 days).

    And... that's pretty much it :P I don't know more about Easter at all.

  • @avistew said: I couldn't tell you how Easter is celebrated in France though as I've never celebrated it. There tends to be chocolate for sale (hens, bells, eggs) and sugar angels are common around then (that's candy), but I guess the religious celebration is different. I only know about lent (you give up something, usually meat, for 40 days).

    Far I understand, the Religious Celebration blended with the Original Pagan celebration of Easter. In this case, was coincidental in the date, but, in other cases like Christmas, it was done for replace the original pagan celebration. (There's a pagan celebration that day, and the new christians decided to replace that with celebrating the birth of Jesus).

    Officially, everything start in Ash Wednesday, which is the first day of lent (And pretty much all the Carnavales are celebrated before that day ;) ). There's an special Mass (The Spanish Word is "Misa", according to Word Reference, that's the translation) where all the assistants get a drawing of a cross in their forehead made of Ash.

    Lent is supposed to be a conmemoration of the 40 days which Jesus stayed at the Desert. The idea is do some sort of sacrifice (Like, not doing something you like) for 40 days. The last day of Lent is Palm Sunday.

    Palm Sunday is the day when Jesus enter to Jerusalem and he was recieved by the people by waving palm leaves and olive branchs. There's an Special Mass where people go with Branchs to the celebration and get those branchs blessed by the Priest.

    Maundy Thursday is the day of the famous Last Supper. This is also the day when Jews celebrate the Exodus from Egypt, and that was why Jesus and his disciples were having that Supper. It's celebrated by having another Mass when the Priest wash some people feets, in comemoration of Jesus doing the same. This day is celebrated because is the day when the Mass itself was created.

    Good Friday is when Jesus was killed, and is comemorated by having the Way of the Cross, which is pretty much remember all the way to the mount with the cross step by step. In some parts they go outside and walk a some sort of circuit with stops every once in a while for remember each step. Technically, this is the only day in the year which doesn't have a Mass.

    Easter Saturday do have a Mass for wait Easter Sunday, which is the day when Jesus resurrected. This is the most important celebration of the Christians, because establish pretty much all they believe about.

    That the established Religious Celebration. There's also other stuff, like just eat Seafood in Good Friday and not Red Meat (Which is a trouble for me, because I don't like Seafood except for Fish) or the Burn of Judas, when they do a Dummy out of old clothes, put some Coins inside and then burn it. That's representing Judas betray to Jesus, and the coins are what he get paid of. There's not too many places where they still bunring Judas, and I forgot today they do that near to my College. Oh, well... next year I guess ^^!

  • @GinnyN said: Far I understand, the Religious Celebration blended with the Original Pagan celebration of Easter. In this case, was coincidental in the date, but, in other cases like Christmas, it was done for replace the original pagan celebration. (There's a pagan celebration that day, and the new christians decided to replace that with celebrating the birth of Jesus).

    Well, I'm not sure exactly what you mean by coincidental. The Last Supper happened to be passover as you said yoursel, which could very well be the Jewish version of the Pagan celebration (that is Spring Equinox), so passover happening around that time might not be a coincidence at all.

    As for Christmas, it was the Winter Solstice, which at the time was on the 25th. Now it's on the 21st because the calendar wasn't quite accurate at the time so it shifted (it's not shifting anymore though since it's been corrected). If I recall, several countries had celebrations tied to the "(re)birth of the Sun", so this day was deemed perfect for celebrating Jesus's birth.

    Sorry, I'm using Seasons for the northern hemisphere, I realise that's a bit... "north-centric?", but I'm not sure what other words I could use.

    I know more about Yule because I've always celebrated it (that's the Winter Solstice/Christmas), but I've never really celebrated Easter/the Spring Equinox so I know much less about it.
    I do know the Spring Equinox focuses on fertility (eggs, rabbits...) while Yule focus more on evergreens (the Yule tree, which was kept for Christmas, the Yule log, which was kept as one of the 13 desserts of Christmas in France, etc).

    I also know these two celebrations are much bigger than the Summer Solstice (don't even know if there is one) and the Fall Equinox (Harvest festival, became Thanksgiving in North America if I'm not mistaken.

    Since you were asking about a comparison between countries, I'd say that in France Easter, just like Christmas, is mostly non-religious. I mean, obviously Christians celebrate it in a religious way but non-religious people will celebrate them in a non-religious way, too. (Although some people like me don't celebrate Easter at all. To be honest it's mostly because the date changes so much, I'd rather celebrate something on a specific date so I know when it is. I had no clue it was Easter until this thread.)

  • The traditional Good Friday crawfish boil was hosted at parents' house this year for the entirety of my inordinately sized family on my dad's side. In addition to the nine sacks of crawfish (think somewhere between 350 - 400 lbs.), a small fair's worth of deep fried seafood, and needlessly plentiful dessert dishes, consider that there was still Easter Sunday to get to. I've done irreparable damage to my body, and if it were possible for me to convey to any of you the sheer amount of food I've consumed this weekend, you'd slap me in the face out of sheer disgust.

    Only in the South.

  • @avistew said: Since you were asking about a comparison between countries, I'd say that in France Easter, just like Christmas, is mostly non-religious. I mean, obviously Christians celebrate it in a religious way but non-religious people will celebrate them in a non-religious way, too. (Although some people like me don't celebrate Easter at all. To be honest it's mostly because the date changes so much, I'd rather celebrate something on a specific date so I know when it is. I had no clue it was Easter until this thread.)

    Latin America is mostly Christian in their culture. I guess is because the Spanish when they come and conquer, they come with the obligation of spread Christianity as well.

    I mean, in Chile, all our holidays are 1- Some sort of Christian Celebration or 2- The Celebration of some sort of Battle (Which normaly we lost it. No, really, I can't recall an important battle in a war which have a Holiday and we actually won).

    Holy Week, or Easter, is a Holiday here. Good Friday and Easter Saturday are holidays, and they are pretty much the best weekend for the Seafood industry in the year. Since those days are Holidays here, we always knew when they are.

    By the way, Easter is always the same day, according to the Moon Calendar. Somehow, near to Maundy Thursday, is always Full Moon.

    And don't worry about establish the dates using the north hemiphere. I understand the idea anyway.

    By the way, do you wanna know what we do for Halloween? We go to the graveyard and leave flowers to our dear people who's dead. My best memories of that date is eat cheap ice cream when my parents are leaving flowers to my grandfather (Which I never met) and play in the middle of the crypts. Some people actually have picnics in the graveyard that day.

    @avistew said: while Yule focus more on evergreens (the Yule tree, which was kept for Christmas, the Yule log, which was kept as one of the 13 desserts of Christmas in France, etc).

    13 desserts? Ok, this is the first time I hear about that. How's that work exactly?

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