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Money?

posted by Avistew on - last edited - Viewed by 808 users

Is money an inappropriate subject?
I like talking about money. I find it relaxing. I was wondering if other people were in the same case and would like to talk about it.

I know it's often taboo (you're not supposed to ask people how much they earn or stuff like that) but I wasn't sure if it's considered controversial enough to be, well, something to avoid talking about on forums.

Either way, if anyone else is interested, here is a money subject. Well, for now. Who knows what it's going to turn into.

105 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @PecanBlue said: Yes, fast. 3-4 hours per class + 11-week term + 5 classes per term = completed within two or three years. One school that does this to horrible extents is Fullsail.

    I was originaly going to go to fullsail, and then Yare told me. "No, It's a ripoff, if you wan the bang for your buck, go to a 4 year school."*

    *might not be entierly accurate, but well it's close enough Me thinks.

  • The thing that frustrates me is cost-of-living. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area, which means that I have to spend well over half my salary each month just to rent a house for my family. Don't get me wrong, I love where I live and don't want to move, but it is still a little sad every time I see/hear about someone buying a brand-new 5 bedroom house or something somewhere and they only earn half of what I make.

    On the topic of spender vs saver, there is an important variable to consider. The money you earn today is worth less in the future. It is often better to put your money to good use in things that have value and are important to you. Obviously you need to save money for emergencies and building up credit debt is an insane idea, but the only way to make savings worth it is to get the money into a retirement account or other long-term interest-earning account. Just having extra money pile up in a no-interest checking account is a total waste.

  • @kaptein_kaffe said: Exactly! I guess it's just a matter of learning how to dodge it. A great argument in any case is to ask them why they bought the 50 inch tv, the iphone or other pricy possessions if they're in such a dire need of money :D

    The straw that broke the camel's back was when he moved into a new place and bought a new computer (because it was on sale) and as a result missed his first rent payment. How can you be so clueless?!

    @kaptein_kaffe said: The thing that frustrates me is cost-of-living.

    I used to live in Paris and I hear you on that.

    @kaptein_kaffe said: Just having extra money pile up in a no-interest checking account is a total waste.

    I wouldn't let it pile up with no interest, personally (as I said we have automatic transfers to savings accounts), but even someone who did, even if the money ends up being worth less and less... It's still worth more than the $0 it would be worth if you had spent it already. Just saying.
    Sure if there is something you really want, and waiting would only mean buying the same thing, but later, and you know it won't reduce in price, then buy it now.
    Otherwise, by the time the stuff you want to buy is available, having spent your money on something else isn't really going to help.

    I guess I just don't get the "spend your money on something, otherwise it will be worth less and less!". Well after I spend it I don't have any at all, so I'll take the reduced value over that.

  • @avistew said:
    I get annoyed at how help is always counted depending on how much your parents earn. I know lots of people who don't get any financial help from their parents, yet because their parents earn over a certain amount, they won't get help from the government either, it's stupid.

    Yep, I think the cut-off date for that is age 25. I wasn't able to get grants because my mother's tax records put me over the financial limit.
    I rarely speak with my mother, much less accept financial help from her. It was highly frustrating to still be considered a dependent.

  • This thread makes me sad everytime I look at it :(

  • @Icedhope said: I was originaly going to go to fullsail, and then Yare told me. "No, It's a ripoff, if you wan the bang for your buck, go to a 4 year school."*

    *might not be entierly accurate, but well it's close enough Me thinks.

    'Tis true, I took a tour of it and researched online about it and it's a pretty-looking and very expensive institute, but not much else. They try and cram everything within one or two years, (Even having labs at 3 AM for christ's sake! I've heard some classes are at this ungodly hour too, but I haven't been able to confirm it so it's a playground rumor right now.) which for a school that expensive is bullcrap. I heard their accreditation sucks also. My friend once tried to talk me into going by saying "people who complain about their schedules don't realize Fullsail just tries to imitate the typical career lifestyle." Excuse me? I don't know about you guys but when I attend a college I pay heavy amounts of money for I expect to LEARN about the career efficiently and also learn about self-discipline in the process, with an actual job on the side.

  • @PecanBlue said: 'Tis true, I took a tour of it and researched online about it and it's a pretty-looking and very expensive institute, but not much else. They try and cram everything within one or two years, (Even having labs at 3 AM for christ's sake! I've heard some classes are at this ungodly hour too, but I haven't been able to confirm it so it's a playground rumor right now.) which for a school that expensive is bullcrap. I heard their accreditation sucks also. My friend once tried to talk me into going by saying "people who complain about their schedules don't realize Fullsail just tries to imitate the typical career lifestyle." Excuse me? I don't know about you guys but when I attend a college I pay heavy amounts of money for I expect to LEARN about the career efficiently and also learn about self-discipline in the process, with an actual job on the side.

    See, thats what I wanted to do, but I heard Fullsail, just isn't that great, and I want to be a programmer, and well I don't think anyone really works until three in the morning unless it's their choice too and or thats what time, a Said schedule shoot is, and I'm pretty sure there are well, day crews and night crews. I agree with you though, I'm getting a free ride through school from the government even though, I'm not paying for it. I want to go to the best I can.

  • It's kind of a paradox: you need to live, but you need money to support yourself, so you need to work to make money, but working usually means less time to invest in the rest of your life.

    I always separate my work from my private life. The two don't combine. My private life is who I am, my work is like a necessary evil.

    While money is important, I don't see how people can actually obsess over their work. I love earning money, it's not that, but what I mean is when the work you do actually becomes more important than the life you're trying to support with the money you earn.

    Perhaps it's just some kind of mechanism to deal with the fact that you actually spend the majority of your time at work, so you tell yourself it's the most important part of your life as well.

    When my wife comes home in the evenings, it's like she's constantly talking about her work and her colleagues. She often becomes quite enthusiastic about those colleagues, and I'm like, "Hey, you're married to me, right? And you've already spent the entire day with those people. So could you just leave them alone and pay ME some attention? I want to hear how YOU are doing, I don't need to know everything THEY said."

    I don't mind sometimes mentioning something. I rarely talk about my work, but I still tell stuff sometimes. But not from the moment I walk in the door, through dinner, even pausing TV programs, and even in bed.

    And that's just because she really likes her work for the fun factor. I dare not imagine how it could be for really career-minded business people whose entire life is nothing but their work.

    But if that is the way some people want it, I'll respect that. I guess it's only natural if you spent thousands on an education in preparement for that job, you want to try your best to earn that all back. I also guess that these people are just investing into their future, concentrating on their work to earn as much as they can, so they can put away as much as they can for when they retire.

    But suppose you have an accident or get sick, and you don't get a chance at retirement?

    I prefer enjoying my "free" life as much as I can. Perhaps I'm not earning as much as I could in a different job, with more responsability but also more hours, but that balance between work and life is just too important to me.

    I sincerely hope I haven't offended anyone with this. Everyone leads their own life, there's certainly no "perfect" path when it comes to this. They're just personal choices and I wanted to express mine, so feel free to counter this with your own, and perhaps try to explain to me the real motivations behind them: I'm definitely open for them.

  • I too, as a part time musician, think it's important to seperate work and your actual life. Maybe I'm just a hippie with a poor work ethic, I don't know. I just can't focus on my music if I'm involved with my work 100% of the time.

    I think it's great to see people who find a way to cope with their work and actually enjoy it. The company I work for is owned by a big company in Oslo, so I meet some of those hardcore office sluggers from time to time. Some of them are very down to earth and talkative people, a lot of them are also very obsessed with their work.

    It's not all that different from being a full time artist when you think of it. The thing you really enjoy just happens to be your job as well.

  • @Little Writer said: It's kind of a paradox: you need to live, but you need money to support yourself, so you need to work to make money, but working usually means less time to invest in the rest of your life.

    I always separate my work from my private life. The two don't combine. My private life is who I am, my work is like a necessary evil.

    I find this sad. For me, you can't be happy if your job, that takes so much of your time, isn't something you're passionate about. I want my job to be like my favourite hobby, except I'm paid for it. I don't want it to be a chore I try to forget as soon as it's over, or something I do just for the money. I think it needs to be something you'd do even if you weren't being paid for it, because it brings you something.
    And then you're paid for it, and that's even better.

    I've seen my father come back and complain about his job (he's a doctor), and when I asked why he did it he was all "well I needed something that would bring me enough money to afford lots of things and have 4 kids, etc", but I kept thinking "and you're not enjoying any of it because you're working a job you hate instead!
    What the hell? Couldn't he have done a job he loved, lived in a smaller place and had only one or two kids, but be able to make them happy? I don't believe you can make your kids happy if you're miserable yourself.

    I realise you don't always have the luxury of doing what you love the most in the world for a living, but if at least you can choose something you don't hate, that seems like a minimum to me.

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