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Books: a literary discussion

posted by Rather Dashing on - last edited - Viewed by 2.6K users

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So I've been eying and lusting after a nook and its fancy new 1.3 firmware even though I know I can't afford one. And all that looking at something meant to read books made me think about...BOOKS.

Let's talk about books. Anybody read anything recent that was really good? Have an obscure old favorite?

Where do you read books? When do you read them? What books do you read? How do you read books?

Etc and so forth.

If it involves books, say it. I'd like some good recommendations on recently published books and currently running ongoing series, too.

My favorite book of all time is Dumas's "Count of Monte Cristo"(or at least the unabridged English translation), though I of course love the geek standbys as well(Hitchhiker's Guide, Neuromancer, Slaughterhouse-Five, Snow Crash, et all). I also have Star Wars books as somewhat of a guilty pleasure.

Also, this isn't the thread about pictures of boobs. There shouldn't be pictures of boobs in this thread.

...unless it's a picture of a book that just HAPPENS to contain boobs. Because then it's absolutely on-topic and worthy of discussion.

...

SO.

BOOKS.

268 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • I'm totally just cut and pasting this from my guild forum, but it's still applicable:
    200px-Haruki_murakami_hardboiled_9780679Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami
    Surrealism without being overly pretentious or obtuse. The reality in Murakami's worlds all seem paper-thin: you can see shadows of things moving around on the other side, but you only ever get glimpses. I really cannot recommend his writing enough, though this is my favorite of his. I also heartily suggest A Wild Sheep Chase if you like the surreal, or Norwegian Wood if you want something a little more human.

    On the completely other end of the spectrum:
    200px-Yotsuba_vol1_cover.jpg
    Yotsuba& by Azuma Kiyohiko
    This is like the comic version of a pile of puppies. No matter how many times I read it, it always always makes my day better. By the same guy who did Azumanga Daioh, but it's actually better. I've gotten a couple of people in the office totally hooked on this.

    250px-Fables.png
    Fables written by Bill Willingham
    Epic graphic novel series about various fables living in the modern day world in secret. I can't think of a way to describe this series that actually does it justice, but trust me it is worth the read. The first book is mostly just a neat story, but they get increasingly better from there.

    Oh, and Discworld. Discworld, Discworld, Discworld. Have you read any Discworld yet? Because seriously, go read Discworld.

  • @Will said: On the completely other end of the spectrum:Yotsuba& by Azuma Kiyohiko
    This is like the comic version of a pile of puppies. No matter how many times I read it, it always always makes my day better.

    Does that mean reading Murakami will make my day worse? Is it sad?

  • Some of Murakami's stuff is sad. All of it is enigmatic. Not sure if that clarifies thing, but he's hard to nail down.

  • @Will said: Some of Murakami's stuff is sad. All of it is enigmatic. Not sure if that clarifies thing, but he's hard to nail down.

    I'm only asking because I followed your linked and read "The 100% Perfect Girl" online and it was sad. I was wondering if all of his stuff was.
    While I can appreciate sad stories, I'd rather know what I'm getting into beforehand :p

  • I'm surprised nobody's mentioned Surfin'the Highway. That counts as a book.

    Also, I enjoy James Patterson novels. Quite exciting. But my bookshelf is mostly filled with young adult's literature, being 16 and all.

  • Also, I suppose it's worth noting that I recently got a Kindle. I freakin' love it. Now if it's something by an author I really care about, I'll go and buy the physical copy. Terry Pratchett is an instabuy in the physical book category. But the kindle is amazing for everything else. I've probably read 10 new books since Christmas on it. Normally I will only read one or two new ones in this time period and the rest will just be re-reads. It is just so much easier to finish a book and then immediately buy the next one from bed.

  • @Avistew said: I'm only asking because I followed your linked and read "The 100% Perfect Girl" online and it was sad. I was wondering if all of his stuff was.
    While I can appreciate sad stories, I'd rather know what I'm getting into beforehand :p

    I'd give Wild Sheep's Chase a try then. That and it's sequel Dance, Dance, Dance are a really good place to start for getting into Murakami. They should give you a pretty good idea of his style.

  • @Will said: I'd give Wild Sheep's Chase a try then. That and it's sequel Dance, Dance, Dance are a really good place to start for getting into Murakami. They should give you a pretty good idea of his style.

    Thanks, I'll make a note of that.

    I adore my Sony Reader, too. I read so much more with it, and most importantly, I've been reading all these classics I never read. While you can't really buy 1,000 books and then read them when you feel like one or another, it's fairly easy to download them, put them on your book reader, and then just start whichever you feel like at that time.
    I also find it handy for library books because I don't even have to go there, and more importantly, I don't have to take the trip to return them, they just expire.

  • @Will said: Terry Pratchett is an instabuy in the physical book category.

    You just described about 60% of my book-buying philosophy. The other 40% goes to authors that I've read previously and any book that has a skull or fire on the cover. Or a flaming skull.

  • I didn't like the discworld, not the prosa, not the humour, not the world.

    But i can laugh about Thomas Bernhard. :O)

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