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The Hidden People

posted by Ne0n on - last edited - Viewed by 1K users

By the look of the posted screenshots/videos and user comments, the hidden people are refered to as the Huldufólk, creatures from icelandic folklore.

593px-Men_hur_kommer_man_in_i_berget%2C_

Being from Norway, I agree that they could be based on the Huldufólk, but looking at the pictures posted, I would say they are a combination of icelandic and scandinavian folklore. Iceland was a part of Norway until 600 years ago, so no big wonder why they should have common folklore.

In scandinavian folklore, we call the creature a "Nisse"(Norway & Denmark) or "Tomte" (Sweden).
They are small creatures, always hiding from humans, and often living on lofts in farms/houses, or more rarely in the forest. They like to live undisturbed, and can cause damage if not respected by humans.
488px-Nisse_d_apres_nature_ill_jnl_fal.p

In the Grickle-video "Hidden people", the scenario is a bit scary. Nisser is not seen as the most scary creatures in nordic folklore, but we have some other creepy ones:

Nøkken:
He is a underworld creature, lives in ponds/lakes and tries to drown people or animals by attracting them with spell-music, or by luring them in other ways. It is said that you can hear his terrifying and tearful screams right before suicides or deaths.
Pregnant or young women, and unbaptized infants are prefered victims.

TheodorKittelsenNokken.jpgTroll:
They are evil, ugly, strong human-like creatures. They appear after sunset, and in the night they kill and plunder. Some trolls steal human babies from their beds, and sometimes exchange them with their own ugly offsprings.

kitt.troll.jpegaskeladden.jpgtroll.jpg

There are several other creatures in nordic folklore, you can watch a video of some here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-BVowBzVOo

I actually hope the Pilot game is as creepy as the "Hidden People"-video, and I think it would be an interesting step for Telltale.

33 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Is the Nøkken sometimes a horse that drowns anyone who attempts to ride it? I vaguely remember a water dweller like that, a Scandinavian version of a kelpie.

    I always loved studying folklore. Seeing how stories or creatures move from one culture to the next is fascinating, and seeing how similar animals can be related to in totally different ways is interesting as well. Like how some cultures saw owls as symbols of wisdom and respected them, while others saw them as symbols of death and decay and considered them "cursed".

  • @Avistew said: In France it's a mouse, who needs the tooth to use as furniture. And it being a mouse, it doesn't need money so it gives it instead. Also, it's small and goes unnoticed.


    Holy crap that's the most adorable thing ever

  • @Lena_P said: Is the Nøkken sometimes a horse that drowns anyone who attempts to ride it?

    Yeah, some stories say he would transform himself into a beautiful horse to tempt people into riding him, and when they did, he would ride back into the water and drown them.

  • @bamse said: Yeah, some stories say he would transform himself into a beautiful horse to tempt people into riding him, and when they did, he would ride back into the water and drown them.

    .... Can folklore be burned?

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @splash1 said: .... Can folklore be burned?

    17th century witch hunters say yes.

  • @puzzlebox said: 17th century witch hunters say yes.

    Unfortunately, their numbers have dwindled so only a Witchhunter Sargent and a Witchhunter Private remain of the Witchhunter army...

    Gone are the glory days...

  • @Ne0n said:

    Nøkken:
    He is a underworld creature, lives in ponds/lakes and tries to drown people or animals by attracting them with spell-music, or by luring them in other ways. It is said that you can hear his terrifying and tearful screams right before suicides or deaths.
    Pregnant or young women, and unbaptized infants are prefered victims.

    TheodorKittelsenNokken.jpg

    The Nokken, or Näcken as we call him, is very prominent in Swedish myth where he is portrayed as a beautiful naked man who would lure children and women to drown in lakes or streams with is enchanting violin music. He could also teach other musicians to play music like him in exchange for three drops of blood, a black animal and some vodka. This was at a very great risk, because the musicians would often get enchanted by the music and couldn’t stop playing until he died of exhaustion.

    There’s a contest every year in my home county, Jamtland, called Näcken of the year. Where men compete in imitating the näcken by playing music in a cold river completely naked (they are only allowed to cover themselves with material found in the woods). The winner gets the title Näcken of the year and a 2000 kronor (about 200$) gift certificate. A very hilarious tradition if I say so myself.

    Heres the homepage of the competion

  • @swedish_jedi said: There’s a contest every year in my home county, Jamtland, called Näcken of the year. Where men compete in imitating the näcken by playing music in a cold river completely naked

    How do they decide on the winner, most women and children drowned?

  • @Avistew said: How do they decide on the winner, most women and children drowned?


    Please, that's ridiculous. How in the world could they measure which man drowned which women and children? It would be a nightmare to sort it all out.

  • @Rather Dashing said: Please, that's ridiculous. How in the world could they measure which man drowned which women and children? It would be a nightmare to sort it all out.

    The first man to call dibs on a kill scores a point.

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