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The Incredible Puzzle Thread

posted by Klatuu on - last edited - Viewed by 4.2K users

Hi,

This is a thread to discuss some of your other favorite puzzles, riddles, brain teasers, armchair treasure hunts, etc.

To get started, here's an online puzzle hunt I've participated in before: Puzzlecrack. It's a week-long competition with clues given through the web page. Past competitions (and solutions) are still there for you to figure out.

Another similar one is Microsoft's College Puzzle Challenge.

Any other favorites?

-Klatuu

598 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Avistew said: Just want to point out that it doesn't have to be an ellipse, it CAN be a circle with A as not-the-center.

    Here is an example, and I showed where the center is, too.

    I could still assume it's a quarter of a circle/elipse if A were in the first quadrant (Top - left part of the center). It's not, so, in this case AD can't be related to a Radius of an imaginary circle, so, I can't solve this problem if I don't know the lenght of either AB or AC (Nope, either knowing AF or AE will help us in that case, because we'll still missing AB and AC).

  • The geometry puzzle reminded me of another site I vistited before -

    http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~wwu/riddles/intro.shtml

    - and some puzzles called sangaku. For example:

    http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~wwu/riddles/medium.shtml#sangaku1

    japtempgeo1-2.gif
    Find the side length of the internal square and the radii of the internal circles, in terms of a.

    (I haven't figured it out, yet. Maybe I'm getting too mathematical here, anyway.)

    The berkeley site has a bunch of other puzzles and riddles, though.

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    Psy

    @Klatuu said: http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~wwu/riddles/medium.shtml#sangaku1

    japtempgeo1-2.gif
    Find the side length of the internal square and the radii of the internal circles, in terms of a.

    (I haven't figured it out, yet. Maybe I'm getting too mathematical here, anyway.)

    I like this. I'm 1/3 of the way done

  • @GinnyN said: It's (((40 / 2) - 5) / 3) * 4.

    What's about, the only place in the world if you go 1 mile to the south, 1 mile to the east, and 1 mile to the north and come back to the exactly same point?

    Chile, after an earthquake moves you back 1 mile to the west.

  • @Avistew said: Just want to point out that it doesn't have to be an ellipse, it CAN be a circle with A as not-the-center.

    Here is an example, and I showed where the center is, too.

    dcd37s.png

    Oh, God, look what I've created...

  • @Klatuu said: This is a thread to discuss some of your other favorite puzzles, riddles, brain teasers, armchair treasure hunts, etc.


    Well, it's actually it's own game, but Deadly Rooms Of Death is basically a long string of more or less brain-wrenching puzzles that combined make up the (mostly user-designed) level sets (called holds) for the game.

    Puzzle + hack'n'slash galore = WIN, at least for me... :D

    (And there's the online high scores - solving a room in less moves than anybody else is often another puzzle in it's own right... ;))

    Try it, the demo is free, and you can play any of the user-made levels with it - the only difference is that the demo has only one set of level graphics instead of 6 and IIRC less music...

    np: Jamie Lidell - Compass (Compass)

  • Just moved it here from the wrong thread, oh well.

    Here is another one, let's name it: One line tells it all.

    Which adventure is this line of a walkthrough refering to?

    "Pick up a jawbone and tusk from the grave."

  • that's not really a puzzle. its more of an ambiguous fanboy reference that a limited number of people can solve. a puzzle has to have something to do with lateral thinking, etc.

    But it's the Dig you're talking about, right?

  • Sure it is, it's a puzzle, riddle however you prefer calling it, which involves a specific knowledge; and yes, you are right on the solution.

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