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  • Fake accents are funnier than real ones. I'm pretty sure it was intentional. Heck, for Team Fortress 2 Valve made sure the Sniper had a phony Australian accent, and most of TF2's creators are indeed Australian. Even the Scout from Boston has a mixed up partially-New Yorker accent.

    Course that's Valve not Telltale, but I can guarantee it's the same deal. I thought they even made fun of his fake accent somewhere...can't remember though.

  • I think that the aim with Jurgen was less to have a German accent and more a vaguely European accent that was, for lack of a better word, flamboyant or even "metrosexual".

    Which is actually far less fitting when we come back and see Jurgen's origins, but it would've been more off-putting to suddenly shift his accent in a later episode.

  • I always sorta thought the fake cheesey acent added to his character, although I can understand why you found it anoying. For some reason I really hate terrible brittish acents, sometimes in the right context it's funny but it mainly anoys me.

    I think the best german impression in a game is the medic from TF2, but not being german even then I don't know if it's good or just insulting. Funny world an't it?

  • @Nagaoka said: Fake accents are funnier than real ones. I'm pretty sure it was intentional. Heck, for Team Fortress 2 Valve made sure the Sniper had a phony Australian accent, and most of TF2's creators are indeed Australian. Even the Scout from Boston has a mixed up partially-New Yorker accent.

    Course that's Valve not Telltale, but I can guarantee it's the same deal. I thought they even made fun of his fake accent somewhere...can't remember though.



    Ah, no! I hate it when people try to imitate our accent. Whenever they try to imitate our way of speaking, they try to force it. But people don't seem to get that the Australian accent is quite relaxed (I think it's actually proven that we use less muscles when we speak that Americans do). I think it's partially due to the Steve Irwin influence - that guy was one of the most famous Australians in history, but he always spoke very emphatically, and when people try to imitate the Australian accent they aren't actually imitating Australians in general; they're just trying to sound like Steve Irwin.

    I don't know if that's actually the case (the Steve Irwin thing), but I do know that no-one can speak like an Australian unless they're actually Australian. The best interpretations I've heard have come from the comedians Arj Barker and Danny Bhoy, but even theirs' aren't brilliant or spot-on.

  • I agree, I can barely stand listening to Americans trying to do Australian accents, because they're always so off. The one time I heard an accurate Australian accent in an American cartoon, I was so happy. The character was voiced by an Australian.

    But I don't mind if the accent is part of the joke, which is how I see it with Jurgen. I have a theory that Jurgen is actually American or something and pretends to be German because he thinks it makes him cooler, though that doesn't explain the zombies.

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    Psy

    @Guinea said: Human Jürgen all the way :D
    Also, why are the umlaut dots missing on the ü, Telltale? I demand an explanation!

    PacMan came by

  • @SillyStell said: For some reason I really hate terrible brittish acents, sometimes in the right context it's funny but it mainly anoys me.



    Same here, I'm actually British and I usually find fake British accents insulting, there are a few times when I find them funny, but I've only played one game where I heard realistic British accents.

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    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    @Hayden said: Whenever they try to imitate our way of speaking, they try to force it. But people don't seem to get that the Australian accent is quite relaxed (I think it's actually proven that we use less muscles when we speak that Americans do).



    That doesn't surprise me! "Australian" is a pretty lazy way of speaking... you don't really move your jaw much, and letters are often just treated as vague suggestions for pronunciation (e.g. saying "Straya" instead of "Australia"). I don't think you can do it right unless it's half-arsed.

    @Hayden said: I do know that no-one can speak like an Australian unless they're actually Australian. The best interpretations I've heard have come from the comedians Arj Barker and Danny Bhoy, but even theirs' aren't brilliant or spot-on.

    The best non-Aussie Aussie accent I've heard is Michael Caine's at the end of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Very impressive.

  • @Shwoo said: I agree, I can barely stand listening to Americans trying to do Australian accents, because they're always so off. The one time I heard an accurate Australian accent in an American cartoon, I was so happy. The character was voiced by an Australian.

    But I don't mind if the accent is part of the joke, which is how I see it with Jurgen. I have a theory that Jurgen is actually American or something and pretends to be German because he thinks it makes him cooler, though that doesn't explain the zombies.



    that realy would explain superballs presence at his castle

  • @puzzlebox said: That doesn't surprise me! "Australian" is a pretty lazy way of speaking... you don't really move your jaw much, and letters are often just treated as vague suggestions for pronunciation (e.g. saying "Straya" instead of "Australia"). I don't think you can do it right unless it's half-arsed.



    The thing about that is that we kind of mix our syllables together, so the words kind of become shorter, and longer words are easier to say. It's such a simple accent, I don't understand why it's so hard for people to do.

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