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Graphic Settings

posted by jondm1 on - last edited - Viewed by 211 users

Has telltale said what the graphics quality settings do? My pc isn't powerful enough to play 1920X1080 with quality set to 9 - if I drop it to 6 the game becomes playable. I have played it at a lower resolution on setting 9 and the only notable difference I noticed is that some of the special effects (toys of power) are better looking. Is there something that says 9 - 4xAA, 8 - 2xAA, 7 - enhanced special effects, 6 - shadows etc etc?

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  • @Ben

    Hmm if i remember things correctly then AA was beeing disabled at lower settings whilst it was enabled at higher settings, i'm talking about the Mac version.

    I agree that things should stay easy but a) the current system isn't and b) it still would be nice if there would be more screws for the users, which btw. also can be offered in a easy way (we once had this discussion with example screens and what not).

    Sometimes you want to experiment with more AA but less lightning, then, when you're running on your battery, you want to run things in a less GPU intensive way, you could have a powerful card but due to some driver issues shadows might be broken, still you could run pixel exact lightning without any probelms and so on.

    There are always situations where a more flexible systems with some toggles comes in more handy as you can't just offer something perfect for all these situations (unless you want to loose yourself in endless permutations) in advance and again it doesn't have to turn more complex automatically, it depends on how and how many possibilities you offer - just getting closer to the sweet spot. :O)

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    Ben Telltale Staff

    Mac actually has no AA at all for the moment (this is on the TODO list).

    I agree that things should stay easy but a) the current system isn't and b) it still would be nice if there would be more screws for the users, which btw. also can be offered in a easy way (we once had this discussion with example screens and what not).


    I think the current system is about as simple as it could be, although this is of course subjective. A user may not know what MSAA means, or understand the trade-offs involved with different lighting quality settings. I think everyone understands that higher numbers mean better graphics :-)

    Having said that I think some more options would be useful, and I certainly agree that a more flexible system could be implemented while mostly retaining ease of use. It's just a matter of time/resources.

  • @Ben said: Mac actually has no AA at all for the moment (this is on the TODO list).


    I think the current system is about as simple as it could be, although this is of course subjective. A user may not know what MSAA means, or understand the trade-offs involved with different lighting quality settings. I think everyone understands that higher numbers mean better graphics :-)

    Having said that I think some more options would be useful, and I certainly agree that a more flexible system could be implemented while mostly retaining ease of use. It's just a matter of time/resources.

    I understand maintaining super simple settings for those less technologically inclined, but I don't understand not having an advanced settings button, complete with big scary words like anisotropic and anti-aliasing to scare casual users from going into it. :p

  • @Ben

    Well, then i was remembering things wrong.

    In my opinion the current system is confusing for simple minded users as they have no idea of what these options are doing and there are too many whilst at the same time it's not satisfying for advanced users as they can't alter things according to their wishes nor do they have proper information about what the settings mean.

    If you're visualising things in a easy way or rename settings to more user friendly terms then people also understand what they alter (blocky, less blocky, no blocks anymore - Sam&Max giving some comments to the altered 3d gfx of them, etc.), if you just throw some buzzwords at them, chances exist that some won't get it but a) visualise it nicely, b) use proper terms and c) you could hide all the technical bazoo in some expert settings (although personally i most likely would stick with the first two options).

    I hear you.

  • @Pale Man said: I understand maintaining super simple settings for those less technologically inclined, but I don't understand not having an advanced settings button, complete with big scary words like anisotropic and anti-aliasing to scare casual users from going into it. :p

    But he's just told us the reason - more elaborate settings mean more QA. With the monthly episode schedule, I see where it causes a problem.

  • I completely understand why the settings are so simple and vague, but as a natural born tweaker, it does bug me a bit. I can run S&M at it's highest settings with no problem, but I do like to know what the engine is doing while running a game.

    Maybe a small blurb under each number? ("Setting 1: No AA, Shader Model 1.0, shadows off, static lighting, etc.") That way, even though there's no functional difference, your average player can say "Oh, my card's capable of such-and-such, so I'll be wanting to use Setting X" instead of having to jump in and out of the game until they get it right.

  • Are you sure the average user knows what their card's capable of?

  • I think ShaggE's definition of an average user isn't mine :p Not only don't I know what my card is capable of (or how to figure it out), I have no clue what 90% of these things even ARE.

  • Sorry, I should have said "average gamer". :p

  • @Avistew said: I think ShaggE's definition of an average user isn't mine :p Not only don't I know what my card is capable of (or how to figure it out), I have no clue what 90% of these things even ARE.

    After this monster thread about your gfx card, you should be an expert by now. :O)

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