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Papierwaite Appreciation Thread

posted by splash1 on - last edited - Viewed by 582 users

Come on, he's the coolest guy ever! He's smart, awesome, and he really gives Sameth & Maximus a run for their money back in 1901!

SnM_TPD_TSM_SS_papierwaite.jpg

Am I right, or what? Who's with me?

17 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @caeska said: By the way, did you know that his name kinda sounds like "paperweight"?

    I never knew that! /sarcasm

  • @queen_of_the_lobsters said: It's not plaid. I want to say its paisley, but I'm pretty sure it's not that either. Whatever it is, I love it.

    I also want to say Papierwaite is Tunisian or Moroccan, if only because of his Arab style outfit (the pointy shoes, the stripey pants, and the fez made famous in Tunisia and Morocco) and the French name. Both countries are Islam with French influence.

    Although I do admire Papierwaite as well, the gentleman in the plaid dressing gown I was referring to was this fellow. Whose name is Joel. Who works for TTG.

    I'd also like to point out that Egyptians are also known for wearing fez, at least until it fell out of favor sometime in the late 60's, early 70's. Although his accent is definitely not an Egyptian or Arab accent at all. And Arabs don't actually wear elf shoes or stripey pants. I think he's just supposed to be a mysterious foreigner who has lived in Egypt for awhile.

  • @Lena_P said: Although I do admire Papierwaite as well, the gentleman in the plaid dressing gown I was referring to was this fellow. Whose name is Joel. Who works for TTG.

    I'd also like to point out that Egyptians are also known for wearing fez, at least until it fell out of favor sometime in the late 60's, early 70's. Although his accent is definitely not an Egyptian or Arab accent at all. And Arabs don't actually wear elf shoes or stripey pants. I think he's just supposed to be a mysterious foreigner who has lived in Egypt for awhile.

    Well, you got me there with Joel! That IS plaid! Kinda wish I could see him with the stripey pants and pointy shoes as well.

    Well, I'm not the best at pointing out accents (my dad's a lot better), and I had been to Tunisia recently and seen a lot of people with fezzes. I heard that fezzes are also popular among tourists in Tunisia since fezzes were popularized there a while ago. So I was really groping from that and Papierwaite's French name. Fezzes may just be prevalent there because Egypt is so prevalent in all of North Africa.

  • How it "Papierwaite" a French name? Doesn't look French to me at all. And I've been told his accent is French but can't hear that, but I have to admit I'm terrible at recognising accents anyways.

    I assumed Papierwaite was from Northern Africa, but I'm not quite sure where I got this impression.
    Oh, also, his "elf shoes", do you mean babouches? Because a patient of my father's gave us some that were really neat, and they did point up at the end and all. And they were from North Africa. I wanna say Tunisia but could be Morocco. I've always been bad of keeping track of which gifts were from which patient.

  • @Avistew said: How it "Papierwaite" a French name? Doesn't look French to me at all.


    Yeah "Papierwaite" is not a French name, but when he introduced himself, he said "my name is Monsieur Papierwaite".

    But I agree that his accent doesn't sound French.

  • Okay, to clarify, Fez is a city in Morocco. That's where the hats came from, and they are worn in Morocco, but they were also de rigeur in Egypt for something like an hundred years, and seeing as how Papierwaite lived there for awhile I'm guessing that's where he picked it up. And the "babouche" are more Turkish than Arab, but were worn in parts of the Arab world an hundred years ago when Ottoman rule covered half of the Arab world. Westerns think they're cute, so like the turban, again not actually traditional, they're still produced for tourist purposes. Also not everyone from North Africa is Arab. Turks aren't Arab either, just so you know. They're Indo-European, but not part of the same sub-group as the Iranians. Or Kurds or Armenians.

    Okay, so if that didn't clarify everything perfectly you probably read it thoroughly!

  • @Avistew said: How it "Papierwaite" a French name? Doesn't look French to me at all. And I've been told his accent is French but can't hear that, but I have to admit I'm terrible at recognising accents anyways.

    Well, the spelling looks like it was influenced by French pronunciation; the "ai" in "Papierwaite" is pronounced the same way as the "ai" in "aimer," the French word for the act of liking or loving.

    @Avistew said: Okay, to clarify, Fez is a city in Morocco. That's where the hats came from, and they are worn in Morocco, but they were also de rigeur in Egypt for something like an hundred years, and seeing as how Papierwaite lived there for awhile I'm guessing that's where he picked it up. And the "babouche" are more Turkish than Arab, but were worn in parts of the Arab world an hundred years ago when Ottoman rule covered half of the Arab world. Westerns think they're cute, so like the turban, again not actually traditional, they're still produced for tourist purposes. Also not everyone from North Africa is Arab. Turks aren't Arab either, just so you know. They're Indo-European, but not part of the same sub-group as the Iranians. Or Kurds or Armenians.

    Thanks for getting the details straight. I love you.

  • @Lena_P said: I appreciate men who can wear a fez and a plaid, flannel dressing gown with panache! :D



    I always thought it was a smoking jacket.

  • @Sausy Gibbon said: I always thought it was a smoking jacket.

    As Lena mentioned up-thread, she was talking about Joel dressed as Papierwaite.

  • @queen_of_the_lobsters said: Well, the spelling looks like it was influenced by French pronunciation; the "ai" in "Papierwaite" is pronounced the same way as the "ai" in "aimer," the French word for the act of liking or loving.


    I disagree; it seems to me that the "waite" is pronounced like the English verb "to wait". And the "Pa" is absolutely not pronounced the way a French "pa" would.

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