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Will TT Engine be capable to render photorealistic graphic?

posted by Bloody Eugene on - last edited - Viewed by 2.9K users

I'm worried that the TT Engine will not be able to deliver high-end graphic that fully respect the high visual standard that the Jurassic Park brand needs. The movie was a milestone about this, but will the TT graphic engine be capable to render lights effects, enough polygons and detailed textures that the project needs?
When JP will be out, another game will be realeased and, although it's a different genre, it will set the graphic standard: i'm talking of Crysis 2.
How will it compare to JP?

The last photorealistic game TT did was CSI: Hard Evidence and although it has clean and nice graphic, it cannot compete with nowadays standards:

744449-csi4_2008_10_12_22_54_48_65_superCrysis_Faces_36.jpg
One of the two is Crysis 2... ;)

Of course all I've said is completely unnuseful if the plan is to release JP for Wii given its old hardware and its crappy and anachronistic 40mb limit...

102 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • You can't generalise this, it depends on the licence, the engine, on what you want to enhance and so on. Therefore the statement that it's no problem enhancing engine A so that it's able to perform like engine B just doesn't work out.

    Whilst theoretically you might could enhance an engine which grants you the rights to do so, it easily could be a complete waste of ressources because you don't have the knowhow/time/manpower and so on to do it correctly, it might be a drag due to the design of the engine or messes up the workflow somewhere else, to shorten it up whilst your idea could be right for a specific case, it doesn't work as a generalization.

    There are engine designs which work in a open modular way where you can exchange certain elements and write it on your own or make usage of some middleware you licence but again, you can't generalise this and say oh it's no problem enhancing the TTT so that it works/looks like theCryEngine for instance.

    Sometimes it can be quite a pain listening to gamers, some horrible examples exist on certain game magazine sites, and their very special kind of views of what all should be no problem and those lazy incapable programmers who just have to, well, i guess you know what i mean.

  • The fact of the matter is Telltale has made improvements to their engine since CSI. You guys have played the new Sam and Max episodes, right? You could take any one of those CSI models, put them into the new engine with its realtime lighting and shadows and complex textures and whatnot, and you'd have something that would look just as photorealistic as the vast majority of PS3 and 360 shooters to have come out in recent years.

  • @taumel said: Whilst theoretically you might could enhance an engine which grants you the rights to do so, it easily could be a complete waste of ressources because you don't have the knowhow/time/manpower and so on to do it correctly, it might be a drag due to the design of the engine or messes up the workflow somewhere else, to shorten it up whilst your idea could be right for a specific case, it doesn't work as a generalization.

    I realize it means extra work, but seriously. The majority of the game developers out there work with the latest rendering technologies*, and gamers expect it. So there's got to be a way to easily streamline it. And if not you can always hire people with the knowhow. And I know that means more money. I'm not saying it won't cost the company more of something, I'm just saying it's more than possible.

    There are engine designs which work in a open modular way where you can exchange certain elements and write it on your own or make usage of some middleware you licence but again, you can't generalise this and say oh it's no problem enhancing the TTT so that it works/looks like theCryEngine for instance.

    Hold on. Are you saying that if one wants to take advantage of certain rendering technologies* in one's engine that they'd have to license it first? I can't think of anything more ridiculous.

    Sometimes it can be quite a pain listening to gamers, some horrible examples exist on certain game magazine sites, and their very special kind of views of what all should be no problem and those lazy incapable programmers who just have to, well, i guess you know what i mean.

    Again, I never said it wouldn't be more work (although the methods that graphics are created with nowadays have become more streamlined and efficient), and I even understand if TTG couldn't/wouldn't do it. I'm just saying it is completely possible to add greater rendering technologies* to an existing engine. And you can generalize that. Any engine has the capability to be more than it is if you have the patience and/or money and knowhow to program it in.


    *When I say rendering technologies, I'm not referring to engines but they way engines render a 3D image. You can't license normal mapping, phong shading, or dynamic lighting for instance, while you can (and must, if you don't already have an engine) license an engine that utilizes these rendering methods.

  • But just because something is theoretically possible, doesn't make it automatically likely nor reasonable. As i already suggested, choosing the right way for your GameEngine involes a couple of questions you first have to answer to yourself according to your specific project/situation/strategy.

    You can write you own renderengine, you can licence one, you can use the one which comes with the gameengine, ...

    What's suprising about that? It's the same like for instance with sound. If you can afford it, you will most probably go with a FMOD licence, if you can't you'll use BASS, openAL, ... write you own audio lib whatever. It's the same thing with a lot of components you need for a game (graphics, sound, ai, physics, ...) as long as your game engine is capable of integrating such components.

    Otherwise you might just use such middleware and write the GameEngine on your own or you can't integrate such things because your engine wasn't designed for such purposes or it would mess up your engine's workflow. There are many possibilities why you can and why you can't do such things. But if you don't want to write a certain component on your own due to some of the reasons we have already talked about and can afford the licence, then why not?

    a) There does exist a mature crossplatform soundengine? Let's see what it costs.
    b) We need some more performance and are in need of some advanced occlusion culling. Let's take a look at Umbra.
    And so on...

    Theoretically you could enhance a Quake I engine to a cryEngine 3 but it would be more a complete start from scratch. As this is a money driven business you'll want to go the way which serves you the best.

    Of course you can licence render engines. With shaders the days of fixed function piepelines are over since years, at least on the desktop. Normal mapping is a concept. You're free to implement it on your own (it's all just shadercode) and it has to wok together with the rest of the lightning system. Beside of this, a renderengine is a bit more than just a pack of shading possibilities.

  • you can't really bolt on more components until it works. most of those components have interoperability issues. ttg uses their own proprietry engine and fmod sound. they have focused the engine on animation cpabilities rather than fast paced performance. i'm not even sure the majority of the character designs use textures. quite a few look vertex shaded. though that has been improving on the latest releases

    frankly i do agree with the original post that both of these new franchises would be better suited to the realistic look as opposed to the cartoon like look they have used of late...but don't be surprised if these titles end up being made on a different engine. especially jurasic park. that is just screaming out for cryengine2.

    but before we cry out for awesome visuals how about some idea of how jurasic park would even work? seems like a limited scope for adventuring.

  • You're kidding yourself if you expect to compare anything Telltale produces to Crysis.

    That's not what Telltale is about.

  • not necesarily by choice. crisis has an art team poached straight from movie studio's. hiring standards specifically mention 3+ years at movie special effects places. crytek's budget would probably rival telltales total combined budget and sales from everything they've ever released.

  • @PariahKing said: You're kidding yourself if you expect to compare anything Telltale produces to Crysis.

    That's not what Telltale is about.

    If TT will release a shoot'em'up, I'll shoot'em'all.

    I'm looking toward a real Adventure Game.
    No RPG, no FPS, no RTS.

  • So you won't be satisfied with the upcoming Dino Chess as well?

  • I'm hoping we won't get photorealistic graphics. I want a slightly exaggerated character design, some great puzzles and a good story! Heh, I often find photorealistic characters rather creepy. But that's probably just me. :D

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