User Avatar Image

What do you look like? (Post a Pic!)

posted by Ashton on - last edited - Viewed by 25.7K users

I was just posting to one of these on another forum and decided to post on here too when I was stunned to find there is not a thread on here for it! (and I searched! I searched through of 17 pages of results!)

So, very simple 1-5 pics of yourself per post, no double-posting pics (though if you want to post more you can at a later point. Please no photoshopping (except red-eye removal or brightness/contrast)

I'll go first

Another_Frontal_View_by_Neko_0ni.jpg

click for full-size view!

Ok, who's th next victem? I mean volunteer! ;)

2.4K Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • User Avatar Image
    puzzlebox Telltale Staff

    A xylophone has wooden bars, a glockenspiel has metal bars.

    I think the etymology is interesting (from Wikipedia):


    Xylophone: from the Greek words ξύλον - xylon, "wood" + φωνή - phone, "voice", meaning "wooden sound"

    Glockenspiel: German Glocken (bells) + spielen (to play)

  • That's interesting. Especially since as a kid, I had a "xylophone" that was metallic. That's how I learned the word and everything.

    I even found this definition:
    1. (Musique) Instrument de musique à percussion composé de lamelles de tailles et d’épaisseurs variables qui forment un clavier sur lequel on frappe avec une mailloche.
    That doesn't specify the "wood" part at all.

    And to be honest, I didn't even know "xylophones" could be made out of wood. All the ones I've ever seen where metallic. I guess "glockenspiel" is too difficult a word for French people :p

  • I always call the glockenspiel, the bells. Bells are also much shorter than a xylophone and produce a ringing sound instead of a thunk. The Harry Potter theme is played on bells if that's any help. What gets confusing for me is telling the marimba and vibes apart.

  • Okay, wait a second. Aren't bells the stuff you shake, and the metal inside touches the metal outside and it makes noise?

  • I've always called the glockenspiel "bells," and our school's band director calls them bells. In fact, uo till now I've heard them be called the glockenspiel about twice.

    And yes, bells are also the ones you shake.

  • @Avistew said: Okay, wait a second. Aren't bells the stuff you shake, and the metal inside touches the metal outside and it makes noise?

    They are as I understand them. It's likely, though, that the first glockenspiels were referred to as such because they sounded like bells. They are both idiophones (that is, the noise is made through a vibration of the instrument itself) and so they're similar in both sound and their respective family of instrument.

    Also, after a little bit of research, it looks like the only real difference between xylophones and glockenspiels is that glockenspiels are made of metal. Although they did evolve separately, they seem to have converged into very similar instruments. They're not to be confused, though, with the vibraphone or marimba, which sound like this: *plays a vibraphone and a marimba*

    Anyway, I had a hair cut so I thought I'd post a more up-to-date picture here. This is also where my special-recipe mouthvatar comes from. Think of this as a DVD extra.

    lolwf.png

    This is my "ecstatic" face. My botox has admittedly made me slightly less expressive, but you can still tell that I'm ecstatic, right?

  • Xylophones and marimbas are both made out of wood; marimbas have a lower pitched sound than xylophones. Vibraphones and glockenspiels are both made out of metal; glockenspiels are much smaller and have a much higher pitched sound than vibraphones. "Vibraphone" is one of those words with a messed up multilingual etymology, coming from the Latin vibrare (to shake) and the greek φωνή. The word "marimba" comes from the Kimbundu language, and apparently just means marimba.*

    *This is all according to my hasty skimming of Wikipedia.

  • @thesporkman said: Xylophones and marimbas are both made out of wood; marimbas have a lower pitched sound than xylophones. Vibraphones and glockenspiels are both made out of metal; glockenspiels are much smaller and have a much higher pitched sound than vibraphones. "Vibraphone" is one of those words with a messed up multilingual etymology, coming from the Latin vibrare (to shake) and the greek φωνή. The word "marimba" comes from the Kimbundu language, and apparently just means marimba.*

    *This is all according to my hasty skimming of Wikipedia.

    The Angolans sure know how to name stuff.

  • @Fealiks said:
    lolwf.png

    This is my "ecstatic" face. My botox has admittedly made me slightly less expressive, but you can still tell that I'm ecstatic, right?

    Sorry, it just reminded me of this:

    screen10.jpg

  • Did I say "ecstatic"? I meant "looking at a Parrot". So yeah, I'm right on the money.

    >.>

Add Comment