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Cucumbers Cut Lengthwise appreciation thread

posted by lu_ming on - last edited - Viewed by 2.2K users

How could we ever forget to make an appreciation thread for the heart and soul of Moleman humour?:D

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  • Pumpkins do have hard seeds.

  • no they don't there is a fine line between hard and soft seeds they are the hardest of the soft i am not sure of the specifics when it comes to determining hard vs soft but pumpkin seeds are soft

  • I can't see how blueberry/strawberry/currant seeds are harder than pumpkin seeds ...

  • I eat pumpkin seeds once, in my chinese class ^^!. Now, those were the biggest pumpkin seeds ever! And maybe not from the same pumpkin you are talking about.

  • I like cucumbers to be honest, they're really good to have on cheese. But they have to be sliced or it's impossible to eat.

  • I remember being taught that gourds are fruit. So pumpkins would be fruit, squashes too and so on.

    Anyways. The interesting thing in French is that we have an aspirate H, but it's only used in laughs and the like. Like "Ha ha ha", each H is aspirate.
    And seriously, why is it called "aspirate" instead of "expirate"? I don't know about you, but I breathe out, not in when I pronounce a H.

  • Because there's an aspirate when you say aspirate? Frankly, there is much about English that doesn't make sense. The important thing is to roll with the punches and not eat bitter cucumbers. (That's one thing I don't get; cucumbers in California never taste as good as the ones I get in KSA. Why the heck would they taste better there when they're grown in a desert?!)

  • @Avistew said: I remember being taught that gourds are fruit. So pumpkins would be fruit, squashes too and so on.

    Anyways. The interesting thing in French is that we have an aspirate H, but it's only used in laughs and the like. Like "Ha ha ha", each H is aspirate.
    And seriously, why is it called "aspirate" instead of "expirate"? I don't know about you, but I breathe out, not in when I pronounce a H.

    "Aspirate" and "expirate" would both essentially mean the same thing. "A" is the Latin prepositional prefix meaning "from," and "ex" is the Latin prepositional prefix meaning "out of." "De" is the prefix meaning "out from," and so "despirate" would also mean pretty much the same thing. "Inspirate" would mean "to breath in." "Obspirate" would mean "to breath in front of." "Conspirate" would mean "to breath with." "Respirate" would mean "to breath back" or "to breath again." Et cetera.

  • @Avistew said: And "zed" for Z.


    As it is in Canada as well.

  • @Wapcaplet said: As it is in Canada as well.

    As far as I know, it is so in any English-speaking country that isn't the US.

    Also, @thesporkman:

    as·pi·rate, tr.v.
    1 Linguistics
    [LIST=2][*] To pronounce (a vowel or word) with the initial release of breath associated with English h, as in hurry.
    [*] To follow (a consonant, especially a stop consonant) with a puff of breath that is clearly audible before the next sound begins, as in English pit or kit.[/LIST]
    2. To draw (something) into the lungs; inhale.

    So when it's not in linguistics, it means to breathe in, not out.

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