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Cucumbers Cut Lengthwise appreciation thread

posted by lu_ming on - last edited - Viewed by 2.8K users

How could we ever forget to make an appreciation thread for the heart and soul of Moleman humour?:D

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77 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Avistew said: I remember being taught that gourds are fruit. So pumpkins would be fruit, squashes too and so on.

    Anyways. The interesting thing in French is that we have an aspirate H, but it's only used in laughs and the like. Like "Ha ha ha", each H is aspirate.
    And seriously, why is it called "aspirate" instead of "expirate"? I don't know about you, but I breathe out, not in when I pronounce a H.

    "Aspirate" and "expirate" would both essentially mean the same thing. "A" is the Latin prepositional prefix meaning "from," and "ex" is the Latin prepositional prefix meaning "out of." "De" is the prefix meaning "out from," and so "despirate" would also mean pretty much the same thing. "Inspirate" would mean "to breath in." "Obspirate" would mean "to breath in front of." "Conspirate" would mean "to breath with." "Respirate" would mean "to breath back" or "to breath again." Et cetera.

  • @Avistew said: And "zed" for Z.


    As it is in Canada as well.

  • @Wapcaplet said: As it is in Canada as well.

    As far as I know, it is so in any English-speaking country that isn't the US.

    Also, @thesporkman:

    as·pi·rate, tr.v.
    1 Linguistics
    [LIST=2][*] To pronounce (a vowel or word) with the initial release of breath associated with English h, as in hurry.
    [*] To follow (a consonant, especially a stop consonant) with a puff of breath that is clearly audible before the next sound begins, as in English pit or kit.[/LIST]
    2. To draw (something) into the lungs; inhale.

    So when it's not in linguistics, it means to breathe in, not out.

  • @Avistew said: As far as I know, it is so in any English-speaking country that isn't the US.


    We didn't make it up -- it's actually a regional British English dialect pronunciation that happened to catch on in the colonies, if this is to be believed. The Straight Dope also backs up that story.

  • I wasn't trying to sound insulting. Changes in language due to distance are common, and considering most of your alphabet is pronounced in a "-ee" way, "zee" makes some sense.
    Just saying that I was aware it's the same in Canada, and in most English-speaking places. Actually in school in France, we weren't even taught the "zee" variation.

    EDIT: and usually, we're taught the stuff that's most different from French. Cue to years of being taught that "voyage", "vacation" and "baggage" aren't words in English, and you need to use "journey", "holiday" and "luggage".

  • I can not stop laughing its too funny....... cut lengthwise... comedy gold

  • In the north-west england it depends on how posh you act really posh is zed normal is zee.

  • @Avistew said:
    EDIT: and usually, we're taught the stuff that's most different from French. Cue to years of being taught that "voyage", "vacation" and "baggage" aren't words in English, and you need to use "journey", "holiday" and "luggage".


    Wha? I'm confused. Why were you taught that those weren't words, or even words not commonly used? At least where I'm from both sets of terms are common.

  • @Nagaoka said: Wha? I'm confused. Why were you taught that those weren't words, or even words not commonly used? At least where I'm from both sets of terms are common.

    That's the point. Even when the words exist and are commonly used, if there is a word close to French and a word not close to French, they either told us that the words didn't exist, like in the examples above, or that they were never used, such as for instance "liberty", which was never used except for "statue of liberty".

    Then in university I was told "oh yeah, all these words exist, we just wanted to make sure you'd learn the words that aren't close to French". We were penalized if we used the "wrong" ones! We got points deduced from our marks for using words like "comprehend" or "utilize". It's ridiculous.

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    Jake Telltale Alumni

    @Hayden said: Well, there's only so much you can say about lengthwise-cut cucumbers. The topic doesn't exactly call for much discussing.

    The solution to that is top stop discussing it then, and move on. This forum in general has become pretty shitty about just letting threads die and starting new ones. It's actually fairly annoying and lame.

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