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We are SO hiring!

posted by nikasaur on - last edited - Viewed by 6.3K users

Haven't heard the news? Sheesh, we've only been saying it everywhere. If you've ever wanted to work for Telltale, now is the time, because we're hiring! A wealth of undiscovered joys await you in lovely Northern California, as you can share philosophical views on video games with your favorite Telltalers over lunch, or play Contra after hours in the meeting room.

You may even hear Mike Stemmle singing.

Think you got what it takes? Head over to our jobs site and show us whatcha got!
http://www.telltalegames.com/company/jobs/

We are mainly looking for applicants within the U.S. but all resumes will be looked at.

481 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Hire me! I could make the tea. ;)

  • @Lena_P said: Why don't you send in a CV anyway?

    ...CV? Lena, you live in America!

  • @Will said: ...CV? Lena, you live in America!

    Must... control... impulses... argharghargharghargh....

    You are saying "Resume", right?

  • @GinnyN said: Must... control... impulses... argharghargharghargh....

    You are saying "Resume", right?

    Yes, they say "resume" in the US. And for those who don't know, CV is "Curriculum Vitae", and it's also used in French, incidentally.

    Also, if you can't control your impulses against Will, I'm going to control them for you. Make of that what you will >.>

  • Yeah, that was my point. In America we say resume (why we use the French word is beyond me). I was just teasing her for being so international.

  • @Will said: Yeah, that was my point. In America we say resume (why we use the French word is beyond me). I was just teasing her for being so international.

    Ginny dislikes the use of "America" to mean "United States", as she feels it's brushing off the rest of America (as in, for instance, South America, where she lives).

    Also, résumé means summary in French, and I don't find it weirder that we'd* use that rather than filet mignon or papier mâché or déjà-vu, so I've stopped trying to understand :p

    *EDIT: I guess I should have said "you"? Oh, who am I kidding, English is one of my languages too.

  • I find it weirder because for filet mignon, etc, most of the English speaking countries and many of the non-English ones use the French term. CV on the other hand is used everywhere but the US and Canada practically.

  • Maybe they thought French was still better than Latin? :p
    Nah, I say that, but English uses Latin much, MUCH more often than French does.
    Great, now I'm super curious. I'm going to try and see if I can find the etymology.

    EDIT:

    @Wikipedia said: In the United States and Canada, a CV is used specifically in academic circles and medical careers and is far more comprehensive; the term résumé is used for most recruitment campaigns.

    @Wikipedia said: resume (n.)
    1804, "a summary," from Fr. résumé, noun use of pp. of M.Fr. resumer "to sum up," from L. resumere (see resume (v.)). Meaning "biographical summary of a person's career" is 1940s.

    I'm not sure how much I learn from that, but I find it interesting that it said resumes "used to be no longer than two pages long" in the Wikipedia page. From making mine and remaking it often back in France (-_-') I know that over there one of the main guidelines is that everything needs to fit on a single (printed) page.
    Although you're also required to join a (handwritten) single page letter explaining why you want this specific job and what you'll bring to the company.

  • Ha! See, I'm not international; I'm academic!

    Hides black tea and basmati behind apple pie and hot pockets.

  • @Lena_P said: Ha! See, I'm not international; I'm academic!

    Hides black tea and basmati behind apple pie and hot pockets.

    I would like to point out that being international is hardly a bad thing. Also, you should hand me the rice and tea before Will spots them, I know where to hide them so nobody will ever find them.

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