36 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • @Lena_P said: Ped Xing is more a case of truncating a word so as to fit it onto a street sign.



    I guess, but France does fine with "passage piétons". It's not like the size is so horribly huge or anything. And seriously, when you're learning English, you look stupid when you ask "Hey, what does "ped gzing" mean?"
    If at least they wrote it like a plus sign, then you'd think it's a cross rather than assume it's a letter like the rest >.>

    I honestly prefer stuff like "thru". Sure, you double-take it at first, but at least you know what it means right away.

  • I've never driven in France, but I'm assuming you don't usually have pedestrian crossings on streets with high speed limits like the US, or at least they're not common. Here there are roads that go from 55 mph down to 25 in about a 1/5 of a mile. It's better to have larger font signs at those places, and nowadays they're often just the pedestrian symbol instead to make them even easier to identify, and fix the language problem.

  • Well, the signs I was referring to in France do have the symbol too, with the text underneath. And I wouldn't know how France's driving work, I barely ever climb in a car when I'm in France.
    Not that it would make me more likely to know anyway since I'd be a passenger and pay absolutely no attention to road signs when there are so many more interesting things to look at.

    I wasn't trying to be offensive or anything, just saying that it felt like being on a cellphone. You say it's because of lack of room, but then the analogy remains, since that's also the reason why stuff are shortened in text messages.
    The point is, it's confusing when you don't speak the language. I'm sure it would be the same the other way around. People who aren't familiar with French would have trouble with "a12c4" or even "a tt" or something.
    I don't know SMS language enough to come up with examples that aren't conversation examples, but I'm sure you get what I mean. Sure, "Ped Xing" takes less room, but if much less people understand what it means it defeats the point.

    Road signs are much better as symbols anyways. Apart from names of places and stuff.

  • Looks a bit fiddly, look at the difficulty they're having dragging those items at the beginning. Despite the finger being nowhere near them, it's still selecting the original one.

  • It is a review copy. They still have about two weeks to tighten up the controls, etc.

    @avistew I'm not upset, I was just trying to explain why it was done. Another thing you have to realize is that X is also a cross, so for a native speaker Xing immediately makes you think of cross-ing. :) Frankly, if you don't speak the language where you're driving you're going to run into trouble anyway because you won't recognize an exit if you see one. "Ausgang? Boy it must be a big city! I see signs for it everywhere around here!"

  • @guitarsareboring said: Looks a bit fiddly, look at the difficulty they're having dragging those items at the beginning. Despite the finger being nowhere near them, it's still selecting the original one.



    Yeah that snuck into the E3 build. Sucks! It will be fine in the one that ships.

  • I guess :p To be fair I was speaking from a pedestrian point of view, so not on highways. On actual crossings, apparently to the attention of pedestrians so they'd know where to cross.

    Also, the X thing might be obvious for native speakers, but you have no idea how long it took me to figure out was "Xmas" was. "Xing" was slightly faster (I had to figure it out on my own, when I ask people kept laughing >.>) but not by that much. If it was X-ing, then yeah, I'd get it faster, but this way it just looks like a normal word I guess.

  • The X in "Xmas" isn't actually the English letter X; it's the Greek letter Chi, as in Χριστός, "Christ."

  • @thesporkman said: The X in "Xmas" isn't actually the English letter X; it's the Greek letter Chi, as in Χριστός, "Christ."



    Or, you know, a cross, which is what Christ was named after. That's the point. the X in Xing isn't the letter X either.

  • The word for Christ is not related to the word for cross. "Χριστός" comes from the verb "χρίω," "to rub or anoint." Christ roughly means "the Anointed One." The word isn't in any way related to the English word "cross," the French "croix," the Latin "crux," or the Greek "σταυρός."

Add Comment