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  • That's interesting. I was told he was named after the word "cross" because that's how he died, and that's why Christians wear crosses because they symbolise him. Made sense to me so I guess I never had a reason to doubt it.

  • @Avistew said: That's interesting. I was told he was named after the word "cross" because that's how he died, and that's why Christians wear crosses because they symbolise him. Made sense to me so I guess I never had a reason to doubt it.

    Well, in Catholic iconography, the image of Jesus on the cross is called the "Crucifix," from the Latin "crucifixus," which is the past participle of "crucificere," "to fix to a crux." Sometimes Jesus in general is referred to as Crucifixus, "the Crucified One," but the more common name Christ has nothing to do with crosses.

  • I'm curious how the abbreviation into "Xmas" came about, now. Surely, the average person doesn't speak much Greek. Is it an old abbreviation then?

    I don't know, might be hypocritical of me since in high school everyone shortened physics and philosophy to φsics and φlo (or sometimes just φ and context dependent) and I never found that weird. I guess the alphabet seems more common knowledge to me than the word for "Christ".

  • Also, it's not until the early 3rd century that evidence that the crucifix was used as a symbol by Christians is found. While it does seem that it had been used for some little time before it's being recorded, for more than one hundred years the fish was the symbol used by Christians. There are also many, many different variations on the "cross" shape used by different Christians at different times.

    I've also heard that supposedly Constantine popularized the use of the cross which he identified with the sword, but I doubt the accuracy of this statement since the cross he used looked more like an X and P smooshed on top of each other.

  • @Lena_P said: I've also heard that supposedly Constantine popularized the use of the cross which he identified with the sword, but I doubt the accuracy of this statement since the cross he used looked more like an X and P smooshed on top of each other.

    Yeah, Constantine popularized the use of the Chi Rho symbol, which is just the first two letters of the word Χριστός layered on top of each other.

  • What does the H in "Jesus H Christ!" stand for? Answers on a postcard addressed to Dept. of wildly off-topic threads.

  • I know the graphics are supposed to be simple, but they seem too simple in my opinion, and they don't really cater for a memorable and engaging atmosphere. Not that I've played the game yet, or seen all the scenes. At any rate, adventure puzzle games like the Professor Layton series really capture and engross you in its world because it looks good - but it's still very simple. The characters don't really move at all.

    Detailed backgrounds would've been nice. Or a bit more detailing for buildings and items, but I guess "really simple" was the production motto. It'll be fun no matter what.

  • I absolutely love the Grickle art style used in the game. And I love that even though it looks like a traditional 2D adventure game at first glance, it still has all of the cinematic camera angles and choreography we've come to expect from Telltale. I'm really looking forward to it.

  • @Avistew said: I'm curious how the abbreviation into "Xmas" came about, now.

    It's the work of those secular blasphemers!

    With Christmas being such a popular holiday, the secular world wanted to fully enjoy it as a holiday - without Christ, mind you. Santa, snow, lights, presents, cookies, etc., however, are retained.

    Pun intended: Xmas is Christmas without Christ.

    Nah, that's too simple and convenient an explanation. X has been used instead of Christ throughout history. The secular world, including me, has adapted the word "Xmas" for their very own "Christ"mas though. I choose to ignore the Christian origin of the X :p

  • @Lead Eater You do realize that the backgrounds in Puzzle Agent aren't just static backgrounds like in Layton, right? The characters in Puzzle Agent actually move around a fully 3D world so there could possibly be movement and interaction with the world outside of cutscenes! (Yes the Layton sprites kind of jiggle in place, but I don't consider that the same thing as, say, actually walking across an environment.)

    At the same time Layton is set in a quaint "Europe" while Puzzle Agent is in the Northern Reaches of Minnesota. I'd say it's a fairly accurate portrayal of a small, Midwestern town. I especially love the Quonset hut diner :p

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