User Avatar Image

Midwest Setting

posted by Lena_P on - last edited - Viewed by 700 users

I was just wondering how familiar non-Usonian (I didn't say Americans, are you happy Ginny? :p) types are with the setting of Puzzle Agent? For example, how many of you have seen the Coen brothers films? What do you think of when you hear the term "Midwest"? Do you think of a place in the States? Do you know where the Midwest is? I'm just curious to hear a "foreign" take on the setting, and the images it conjures up.

102 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • (90°F is 32°C and 100°F is 37°C)
    My first year in Alberta, it started snowing in September, and when I left in the last days of May there was still snow everywhere.
    At least while it's snowy it's not that hot? Although the shift can be brutal, so it being super hot doesn't mean that there isn't still snow everywhere that hasn't melted yet.
    Why did people ever settle in places like that? It's insane.

    Incidentally, the hottest weather I experienced was in 2003 in Paris, when it reached up to 40°C and was over 35°C most of the summer. It wasn't that bad though, for some reason. Alberta is much less hot and yet much worse, I think it's because it's so dry. And there is much less shade since it's so empty, you're pretty much always in the sun.

    I'd be interested in knowing what region is called "Midwest" exactly, could someone put up a map? Because Minnesota looks more East than West to me.

  • Dry heat is nothing, we have wet heat. Wet heat just makes you feel disgustingly gross. We have a huge amount of humidity at all times, and I can definitely tell you that dry heat is far more bearable than wet.

    Also: I have no clue why it is called the Midwest, but it is.

    300px-Map_of_USA_Midwest.svg.png

    I should also point out that I live near the lower left hand side of Wisconsin, and the weather is likely much snowier further north.

  • @Secret Fawful said: When they say nothing ever happens in the Midwest I can vouch for that. It's the most boring place on the earth. The Coen Brothers glamourize. Actually, what Coen Brothers movie is set in the Midwest? No Country For Old Men was it wasn't it?



    There's "Fargo" and "A Serious Man" which were set in, well, Fargo, North Dakota and a Minneapolis suburb, respectively. And Stephen King is from New England, which is like the Midwest, I guess, only it has access to the ocean. So ... lobsters and crab rather than trout. And the emo vampires are in Washington state which is also on the ocean, only the Pacific which is on the other side of the country.

    This wiki article should give a pretty good idea of where the Midwest is.

  • @Avistew said: I'd be interested in knowing what region is called "Midwest" exactly, could someone put up a map? Because Minnesota looks more East than West to me.



    I think it's pretty amorphous. Given the way U.S. history unfolded, the Mississippi River, rather than some arbitrary halfway point, is often regarded as the dividing line between east and west in the U.S. So geographically, the half (or so) of the west that is closest to the Mississippi is the Midwest, in contrast to the far west. Of course, the source of the Mississippi is in Minnesota, so that's not a definitive answer. Culturally or socioeconomically, the term Midwest can refer to that part of the U.S. that is grain-farming-intensive, an area that mostly coincides with the geographical explanation.

    Oh, and just to obfuscate things even more, the term Midwest can itself be refined further, as in "Upper Midwest", which tends to refer to Minnesota and/or the Dakotas, etc. :)

  • The game's setting is a pretty generic wintery small town, so I don't think it really matters if you know about midwest or not. I've known where midwest roughly is for a long time, but I didn't know it extends that far up to the east. I always thought it as west from the great lakes.

    I have no trouble relating to the setting, either since I come from a Nordic country. :)

  • @Pale Man said: Dry heat is nothing, we have wet heat. Wet heat just makes you feel disgustingly gross.



    Well, when I was in Guadeloupe, it was very much wet heat, and I liked it better. You need to sweat less and to drink less, and sure you're all sticky but that's always the case when it's hot, difference is here it comes from the outside instead of the inside.
    I thinks with fans and stuff I'll take dry heat, but as it is I'll take wet heat. If I'm making sense.
    I usually wear wet clothes in summer. Like, I wash them but don't dry them, put them on and leave. That cools me down a little bit. For the first few minutes haha.

  • The more humid it is, the hotter it feels at similar temperatures. You're the first person I know that prefers wet heat over dry.

    You aren't required to sweat any less, the problem is that sweating doesn't work as well as in dry heat so the body can't cool down that easily.

  • @Avistew said: Well, when I was in Guadeloupe, it was very much wet heat, and I liked it better. You need to sweat less and to drink less, and sure you're all sticky but that's always the case when it's hot, difference is here it comes from the outside instead of the inside.
    I thinks with fans and stuff I'll take dry heat, but as it is I'll take wet heat. If I'm making sense.
    I usually wear wet clothes in summer. Like, I wash them but don't dry them, put them on and leave. That cools me down a little bit. For the first few minutes haha.



    When there's low humidity, I can barely even tell that it's hot. When there is high humidity (which there almost always is in the summer here), I can barely even move without sweating profusely, and I just generally don't feel like doing anything but dying of exhaustion.

  • Maybe I've never experienced real wet heat then. I know I dislike the Prairies' dry heat, I drink a minimum of two gallons of water a day just to get by, and that doesn't even include other drinks (typically tea).
    It's a pain.

    I liked Paris. Rarely went down to freezing temperature in Winter, rarely was incredibly hot in summer and always had shade everywhere, as well as places to cool down, be it by entering a store or a bar or a pool.
    Oh, and you don't need to carry a sweater with you in summer in case you need to enter a mall. Seriously, in North America (where I've been in North America, I should say), I keep a sweater with me because the malls are kept so cold that I get sick otherwise.

    If the winter is too cold for humans and the summer is too hot, and they both last a while, is there any time at all to visit?

  • I'm from Nebraska, but I've always lived in Lincoln, which has a population of 250,000 or so. I realize that probably sounds awfully small to some of you big city folks, but it's nothing like the small towns depicted in movies.

    So, erm... Yeah, I don't actually have much to contribute...

Add Comment