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Puzzle Agent impressions!

posted by Jake on - last edited - Viewed by 3.1K users

PuzzAgent_puzzled_patron.jpgPuzzle Agent is here!

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What is the mystery of Scoggins?

What the heck is going on Scoggins, Minnesota? When White House inquiries to the Scoggins Eraser Co. are answered only with curious puzzles, the U.S. Department of Puzzle Investigation's Nelson Tethers is sent on the case.

As the government's sole Puzzle Agent, Tethers has his hands full: the strange case of Scoggins plunges him into a mystery that will challenge every ounce of his expertise, and possibly his very wits too. Tethers must overcome brainteasers at every turn, including mazes, logic puzzles and riddles. He soon realizes that these - along with the clinically pre-occupied townspeople, secret societies, and mysterious sounds from the forest - are intimately connected to the core conundrum. And what's with the gnomes?

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So you guys have been playing it a bit, I hope! What do you think? Let's talk Puzzle agent!

296 Comments - Linear Discussion: Classic Style
  • Thanks to Telltale for putting out such a neat game! I played the Professor Layton games for the DS, and I feel that it more than adequately prepared me to play this game well.

    Some people have already said this, but there were some puzzles that were poorly worded (arm wrestling and fish, namely) And I also noticed a few spelling errors (Teethers? You missed out on a funny joke by having it written wrong and pronounced by the voice actor correctly.)

    I appreciated the go-here-next bar at the top of the screen most of the time, but it was irritating that you had to follow the instructions right then and couldn't go to a different area. (You WILL ride the snow-mobile)

    I started out playing Sam and Max and Monkey Island. It's cool to deviate from these very funny games in such a profound way. Puzzle Agent retains all the quirkiness of other Telltale titles while scaring me silly. I hope I don't have dreams of pointy red hats... The character design and music lend themselves superbly to the telling of the story.

    I hope I can return to Scoggins and get some answers in a future game, and also hear the strangely Sarah Palin-esque voice of the hotel clerk.

    Thanks again for an enjoyable experience!

  • Well I like the style, but one the second puzzle with the logs and such the puzzle is broken I guess? No logs or anything else appear on the grid... can't for the life of me understand what to do there.

  • @StingingVelvet said: Well I like the style, but one the second puzzle with the logs and such the puzzle is broken I guess? No logs or anything else appear on the grid... can't for the life of me understand what to do there.

    You can move the logs that are already placed. Is that what you mean? Or is there literally nothing?

  • @LordKinbote said: You can move the logs that are already placed. Is that what you mean? Or is there literally nothing?

    There is nothing, I guess it is a glitch. There are no logs, no hotel, no snowmobile or lights, just a grid with trees.

    I'll try rebooting the game.

  • Well I could not leave the puzzle to save I guess, tried everything to stop talking to the old man. Eventually I just stopped the game with alt-f4... then of course it asks me to start a new game. I do, and then discover that the cut-scenes are not skippable and I have to sit through everything again?

    Way to go at making me never want to play this game again. Oh well.

  • Skippable cutscenes would've been nice.

  • One final note: Coming from Wisconsin, we love to poke fun at Minnesota's use of the words "Hot Dish" for Casserole. Although, in the long run, it probably makes a whole lot more sense.

    Dang, now I'm in the mood for Macaroni Bake or Cheeseburger Casserole (the one with tater tots on top...)

    The Midwest is fantastic.

  • So far, I'm liking it. I'm liking the environment as well. I also think the puzzles are quite pleasant. I actually did get stumped, one time, already. Partially because I just didn't *see* the puzzle with the right perspective and shading. I guess, it probably would've solved itself if I copied it down on paper and actually filled it in without trying to mentally fill it in on the screen. Oddly enough, it would be one case where it would be more easily solved on a portable system.

    Otherwise, as another person said, it's nice to see some puzzles that (at first glance) look like they don't give you enough information, but you realize that they did.

    And though I've already played through the first two Professor Layton games, I've already seen a lot of puzzle types that I've never seen in either of them. (Most of them, actually.)

    Tethers is also a pretty likable guy, to me. You can almost see, in his mannerisms and know-how, that he's a guy who has some training in field work, but for some reasons he's been relegated to a nearly forgotten line of work in the FBI. He comes across as a guy who is aspiring for some higher office in the FBI, and yet he isn't incompetant. A good way to break away from the Hollywood movie stereotype.

  • @scoundrelking said:

    I know that in some puzzles the rules could have been a bit more explained, but it's not the end of the world. The 100% perfectionists are grumping about it, but trial and error are part of adventure gaming for me.

    Trial and error in adventure games is fine, but this is a puzzle game which explicitly punishes you for experimenting by reducing your rank. If the scoring system encourages first time solutions then you should be able to solve the puzzles first time, without entering a trial solution to work out what the rules mean.

    Even if you enjoy that it still wouldn't excuse the puzzle with the maze to get to the lightbulb, where a totally missing rule means there are several alternate solutions.

    I agree that the easy jigsaws were a shame - allowing the pieces to be rotated would have reduced the problem of too much of it solving itself by accident.

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