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Does anybody know how I can know if a PC game is compatible with my OS?

posted by roberttitus on - last edited - Viewed by 272 users

Like there are a few older games that I am wanting, but I run Windows 7. The thing is that a lot of the games that I'm looking at don't say that they are compatible with Windows 7. For example Sonic Adventure DX.... it says that its highest OS specification is Windows XP. Then again at the time of its release I'm pretty sure that Vista wasn't even out yet. Thats whats got me confused... does that legitimately mean that its maximum is XP or is it a product of the fact that it was the newest OS at the time?

BTW. Sonic Adventure DX is just an example, so please don't think that this question is limited only to it.

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    Tea

    If it says 'for Windows XP', it'll work on 7. Difference being that you might have to install DirectX 9 (easy enough) or older versions of .NET and Visual C redistributables. You will find the Microsoft download centre links to any of these things as the first result on Google.

    If it says 98 or 95, you'll have a hard time. Especially if you're running 64bit 7 as 16bit executables (meaning most games from before 1997) won't run without emulation or interpretation (such as DOSBox, ScummVM etc) and not all games have such tools built for them.

    It's very strange that no one has built a 16bit library for 64bit Windows.

  • @roberttitus said: It doesn't work that way....


    I did just that & most of the time no (valid) results pop up

    1. Sonic Adventure DX
    2. Crazy Taxi III
    3. The Prince of Persia Sands Trilogy
    4. Borderlands (Which is actually also compatible with Vista)
    5. Unreal Tournament

    Bordelrands was already addressed and I didn't find anything on Kao the Kangaroo, either way it seems these games all work on 7, some albeit with some fiddling about

  • Sonic Adventure DX works for me on Windows 7, Crazy Taxi 3 works too, but it seems to be too fast, this may not be an OS problem.

  • If you spring for Windows 7 Professional, you get access to XP Virtualization mode, which is basically a Virtual PC with Windows XP running on it. I've found most things that don't work on my 64-bit Windows 7 PC (including 16-bit programs) do work OK in XP Virtualization mode.

    Or you could just do an Internet search and see if anyone has commented if the game you're interested in works on Windows 7 or not.

  • @JedExodus said: 1. Sonic Adventure DX
    2. Crazy Taxi III
    3. The Prince of Persia Sands Trilogy
    4. Borderlands (Which is actually also compatible with Vista)
    5. Unreal Tournament

    Bordelrands was already addressed and I didn't find anything on Kao the Kangaroo, either way it seems these games all work on 7, some albeit with some fiddling about


    How you found all of that I'll never know.... but I do greatly appreciate it.
    Thank you :)

    @JedExodus said: If you spring for Windows 7 Professional, you get access to XP Virtualization mode, which is basically a Virtual PC with Windows XP running on it. I've found most things that don't work on my 64-bit Windows 7 PC (including 16-bit programs) do work OK in XP Virtualization mode.t.

    I have a tab under properties/compatibility of a few of my current games that says "Run this program in compatibility mode for". Is that what you are talking about?

  • @roberttitus said: I have a tab under properties/compatibility of a few of my current games that says "Run this program in compatibility mode for". Is that what you are talking about?

    No, that comes with every version of Windows Vista or Windows 7. That changes some system calls to try to behave like older systems used to, and it often works for older programs. It's not perfect, though.

    The XP Virtualization Mode is more complex than that. It runs an actual copy of Windows XP inside a Virtual PC that is running on your computer. You even have to load separate security patches for it. The reason it's there is that Microsoft is trying to tempt businesses that are still running Windows XP into upgrading to Windows 7. The businesses might be scared to upgrade, thinking their old custom-built works-fine-on-XP applications won't work anymore. With XP Virtualization Mode, you can tell those businesses, fine, here's a copy of XP inside your Windows 7, and if your old applications won't work on Windows 7, you can still run them inside this Virtual PC, while taking advantage of Windows 7 features for your newer applications.

    I'm not a business. Instead, I use it because I have some old external hardware that doesn't have drivers that work with 64-bit Windows 7. They work fine in XP mode, though. For example, I have a scanner here, and if I want to scan something, I start up XP mode and scan it there. It's also the only way I can run 16-bit programs, which absolutely refuse to run on 64-bit Windows 7 no matter what compatibility mode you choose.

  • @Graxer said: Sonic Adventure DX works for me on Windows 7, Crazy Taxi 3 works too, but it seems to be too fast, this may not be an OS problem.


    That could be down to having a much faster processor, or two than the game was built for.

    I can also say the Sonic Adventure DX does work on windows 7, but I think the windows key crashes the game.

  • @TheJoe said: It's very strange that no one has built a 16bit library for 64bit Windows.

    The world has moved on. :)

  • @Friar said: I can also say the Sonic Adventure DX does work on windows 7, but I think the windows key crashes the game.

    If I remember correctly the same happens in XP. It happens whenever sonic.exe isn't the top window.

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